Planet Mozilla Reps

Call for Nominations – D&I for Participation Focus Groups
Emma on January 18, 2017 12:25 AM

The heart of Mozilla is people – we are committed to a community that invites in and empowers people to participate fully, introduce new ideas and inspire others, regardless of background, family status, gender, gender identity or expression, sex, sexual orientation, native language, age, ability, race and ethnicity, national origin, socioeconomic status, religion, geographic location or any other dimension of diversity.

In a previous post, I outlined a draft for a D&I for Participation Strategy.  Since this time, we’ve been busily designing the insights phase  – which launches today.  In this first phase, we’re asking Mozillians to self-nominate, or nominate others for a series of focus groups with D&I topics relevant to regional leadership, events, project design and participation in projects and beyond.  These insights will generate initiatives and experiments that lead us to a first version of the strategy

To be successful moving forward, our focus groups must represent the diversity of our global community including a range of:

  • First languages other than English

  • Region & time zones

  • Skill-sets (technical and non-technical) contribution

  • Active & inactive contributors

  • Students & professionals

  • Gender identities

  • Ethnicities, races, and cultural backgrounds

  • Ages

  • Bandwidth & accessibility needs
  • Students, professionals, retired and everyone in between

  • New, emerging and established contributors

  • Staff, community project maintainers designing for participation

Focus groups will be conducted in person, online and many in first languages other than English.  We’ll also be reaching out for 1:1 interviews where it feels more suitable to group interviews.

If you believe that you, or someone you know can provide key insights needed for a d&I community strategy – please, please, please nominate them!  Thank you!

Nominations will close January 23rd at 12:00 UTC.   For more information, and updates please check our D&I for Participation  Strategy wiki.

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2016 : A Year in Memory : Thanks to Mozilla and Mozillians
Hossain Al Ikram on January 12, 2017 11:16 AM

2016 was all about myself being an leader. Throughout the year, I have gone through many volunteer leadership activities. Like my year of 2014 and my year of 2015, 2016 was also a blast. I contributed to my regular functional activities as well I have explored some other contribution opportunities. 2017 is going to be a big year for me, but all the behind scene happened in 2016 and I wish to recall all the memories!

The Year started with Privacy Month Campaign, initiated by Mozilla India. Mozilla Bangladesh community planned to join the initiative by organizing our own Privacy Week. To make it happen, we invited all the facilitator who will help us to organize talks/activities in their campus in “Mozilla Bangladesh, Privacy Week : Train the Facilitators” where we shared, discussed about Privacy Week and all the needful things.

The next day, I along with more 8 mozillians (including 6 Reps) went to Singapore to join Mozilla’s Leadership Summit, Singapore.

Mozilla’s Leadership Summit, Singapore was my first event outside the city. I got to meet many Mozillians, Reps, Mozilla Staff for the first time. Also, I could hear about many strategies in and around Mozilla. This event helped me to inspire a lot and energized me to inspire my community more.

 From 28 January to 04 February, Mozilla Bangladesh organized Privacy Week , a week dedicated to raise awareness about privacy among friends, family and anyone who is a user of the Web. and luckily, I contributed as one of the leader of Privacy Week.

&HUGEIT

  • Privacy Talk @ Gono Bishwabidyalay
  • Privacy Talk @ East West University
  • Privacy Talk @ Brac University
  • Privacy Talk @ Feni Computer Institute
  • Privacy Talk with friends @ East West University
  • Privacy Talk @ American International University Bangladesh
  • Privacy Talk @ Dhaka Polytechnic Institute
  • Privacy Talk @ Eastern University
  • Privacy Talk @ Daffodil International University
  • Privacy Talk @ North South University
  • Privacy Talk @ Port City International University

During the privacy week, I got the opportunity to join few talks organized by many Mozillians. I was invited by Saddam Hossain to join his Privacy talk @ Eastern University.

A day later, I joined Privacy Talk @ GONO BISHWABIDYALAY organized by Hasibul Hasan Shanto. This was the first activity of Mozilla in Gono Bishwabidyalay.

On the way back, I joined Privacy Talk @ East West University organized by a awesome series of Mozillians ( Sayed Mohammad Amir, Mohammad Maruf Islam, Muktasib Un Nur, Ehsanul Hassan, Fahmida Noor, Kazi Nuzhat Tasnem). I saw a good number of people waiting to know about privacy and all the way, it was good.

Mozilla Bangladesh organized first community event for the year with “MozCoffe Dhaka Meetup”. I met many QA contributors in the event. As it was my first interaction with my contributors, I along with them planned for the quarter and beyond.

And obviously, there was Mozillians from different contribution areas. It becomes special when the whole community meets 🙂

Inspiring from all the plannings i brought from Mozilla’s Leadership Summit, Singapore, I thought of reaching my contributors and along with other QA community mentors, I organized Firefox 45 Beta 3 Testday.

I joined SuMo Contributor Mentoring Day – Dhaka to cherish my past functional contribution area. Meeting with ex co-workers and seeing them to work for achieving goals is really inspiring. Passed an awesome day with Mozillians, I used to work with.

Finally, I received this opportunity to be an Regional Ambassador Lead of Firefox Student Ambassadors, Bangladesh!

It’s been long, since we have been getting to meet all the contributors somewhere in a single place. And also it was about defining the same goals for contribution for everyone. So, I along with other QA Community mentors, Many Mozilla Staff including SoftVision people, planned to organize our first contributor only event Mozilla QA: Bug Marathon, Dhaka. This event was 2 day long. In this 2 day, we tried to leverage the power of community, while learning and doing contribution. This was one of the greatest initiative for 2016.

Then the Best moment came! I was invited to Mozilla All Hands, London 😀 But, Unfortunately, My Visa was refused, So, I missed the opportunity to join this global meet.

During Ramadan, We again met together for Mozilla QA Bangladesh : Community Iftar.  The motive was simple, have iftar together and be united as community and well, it was success.

I became Mozilla Reps Mentor, this year. This was one of the opportunity I was looking forward for a long time. More time needed to explore as a Reps Mentor!

The community was going strong, but we needed more strength from the Mentors. To sync up with each other and make more fluent, I organized Mozilla QA Bangladesh: Train the Trainers V1.0 

And it was time for MozillaBD second Mid-term planning 2016. I joined the event and tried to collaborate with other QA contributors and reviewed what we promised in the first midterm and what we could have achieved till now. The good thing is, we were the only pathway that could have completed all the plannings 😀

Firefox Team was prioritizing things with Firefox Test pilot and as we contribute to support the team, we were trying to shape our activity to include Test Pilot. To make it happen, We planned to organize Firefox Hack Day, Dhaka to see our learning’s together.

I organized Web Compat and Firefox Test Pilot Sprint : Train the Trainers to have a understanding about our strategies for Test Pilot with our core contributors.

In August, I got the opportunity to volunteer as Reps Regional Coach for for my region ( China, Taiwan, Bangladesh, Japan )

I was also invited to Mozilla All Hands, Hawaii! All Hands is always inspiring and this couldn’t be a more happy thing for me!

I supported EWU Mozilla Club and their awesome Mozillians by organizing Mozilla Awareness Booth @ East West University. There was a huge crowd from people to know more about Mozilla and contribution opportunities. More pictures are Flickr.

A new program with a new responsibility. Hope to do more goodness. Hoping to provide more support to Campus Clubs in Bangladesh in and around.

To promote QA, We started Mozilla QA : Contributor Engagement Tour, Bangladesh. We approached Rajshahi College to host our first event in Rajshahi and we received a tremendous support from them.

We also received huge support from Varendra University and their students who helped us to organize the event and participated in the event.

To revamp our hectic activity, I organized Bug Day, Dhaka ( which starts Mozilla QA Bangladesh: Contribution Week, where the goal was to achieve our goal throughout the week )

Become ReMo – Mozilla Reps of the Month for October, 2016. This is an honour to have the same privilege for the second time!

To empower our Woman contributors and inspire more to contribute, I supported our woman contributors to organize Mozilla QA Bangladesh: Woman in QA. Azmina Akter Papeya, Kazi Nuzhat Tasnem, Mahfuza Humayra Mohona, Rezwana Islam Ria, Saheda Reza Antora played an fabulous job by successfully organizing this event. Not only that, they are following up with the participants till now to do more help.

And Finally, I reached Hawaii to be apart of global awesomeness, Mozilla All Hands, Hawaii! Passed 2 weeks of hectic travel and adventure and one of my bestest memory dripped event.

To promote QA more, I approached Hasibul Hasan Shanto to help us organize Mozilla QA: Contributor Mentoring Day @ Gono Bishwabidyalay. We get immense feedback from the event about many Test Pilot features.

And the year ended, with meeting with everyone \o/

SO, That was my year 😀

Though, this year was not much eventful but this was something more than only events. I along with my community had gone through enormous plannings, strategy to shape community, worked together to fix working module and many more.

If you think, all this things are done by me, You are right 😀 Well, there are many people who loves to put me forward, hiding their faces. So, all the things that I wrote above is because of all the support I received from people around me. Otherwise, It was never possible to rise as a leader and lead the community.

If you are seeing the output, I wish to thank everyone without whom this would have never been possible. I want to thank each and every one for the contribution they did in my life. At first and as always, I want to thank Ashickur Rahman for everything you did, It was more than a community person, A close brother, on whom I can always depend even in dead hours 😀

I would like to thank Faisal Aziz (Faisal Bhai) for all the help and support that he did this year. Thanks a lot, bhai. I was in true need of yours and you have supported me in every place and space where I would have need you.

I wish to thank Mike Hoye, without whose support I would be struggling a lot. You had been and you have been helping and guiding the community for a long time. Thanks for all the support.

Thanks to Ryan VanderMeulen for all the support you did to me and my community last year and first 2 quarters of this year. Thank you, Ryan.

I want to thank the whole Softvision Desktop QA team for their amazing support to me and Bangladesh QA Community. On behalf of the community, I would like to thank all of you – Florin Mezei, Andrei Vaida, Bogdan Maris, Mihai Boldan, Cornel Ionce, Paul Silaghi, Petruta Rasa, Camelia Badau and everyone else in the Desktop team who has been making the Testday, Triage Day and Verification Day more awesome. Thank you people. ( P.S. : Next time, we meet, I will make sure you receive a gift from my community 😉 Keep in loop )

I want to thank Ada Lucinet for helping me with plannings and be a friend always. Thanks for all of your support. Thank you.

I want to thank Rezaul Huque Nayeem, Nazir Ahmed SabbirRatul Islam, Mohammad Maruf Islam. Well, You were always behind me, So I never can be more grateful to anyone for helping me all the way and leading together the most awesome community.

Unlimited Thanks continues this year also to Towkir Ahmed and Sashoto Seeam for helping whenever I needed both of you. Thanks for all the artwork and banner design and every bit of help that you guys did. And Seeam, for you, We have our very own Tshirt design 😀

Special thanks to a lot of buddies: Asif Mahmud Shubho, Muktasib Un Nur, Ehsanul Hassan, Almas Hossain Tushar, Maruf Rahman, Rahim Ul Islam Rifat, Majedul Islam Rifat, Sayed Ibn Masud, Tarikul Islam Oashi, Azmina Akter Papeya, Meraj Kazi, Mahfuza Humayra Mohona, Nawaf Chowdhury, Saddam Hossain, Tanvir Rahman, Forhad Hosain – You all had been amazing on your parts. Without all of you, my last year wouldn’t be possible. Thanks for doing all the things and help you did. You guys are ইয়ে দুনিয়া পিত্তালদি, বেবি ডল না সোনে দির বেবি ডল :p

There are still many names, I want to thank each and everyone who helped me throughout the process. All the QA contributor who are part of Mozilla Bangladesh QA Community. Sometimes, thanks is not enough but still I want to thank everyone and wish, maybe I will get your help and support in future, too.

======= Thanks for Reading ====== Please share your thoughts in comments. ======


Rep of the Month – December 2016
mkohler on January 10, 2017 02:09 PM

Join us to congratulate Srushtika as Rep of the month for December.

Srushtika is an undergraduate student in her final year. She describes herself as “Tech-Speaker at Mozilla that loves speaking and advocating new technologies that could change the way we spend our lives.” But she is so much more than that. During the last few months she has been working along with Ram on building the local Indian WebVR community. She has also created MozActivate best practices while she is also working on an intro guide for newbies in WebVR events based on Rust guides.

Moreover, she is heavily involved on shaping the Campus program and suggesting activities for campus students. All the above gained her a mention on the VR/AR inspirations of 2016 blogpost. When she is not studying or contributing to VR, Srushtika is helping the privacy month team from India on advocating about privacy in social media. Check them out on #privacymonth.

Congratulations Srushtika, you’re a true inspiration to all of us. Keep on rocking! Please join us in congratulating her over at Discourse!


Rep of the Month – November 2016
mkohler on December 29, 2016 11:20 AM

November’s gone but our lovely Reps made sure to leave a footprint of it behind with amazing activities. One that stood out was Ram Dayal Vaishnav, a Rep for almost three years now. He is always up to speed and engaged in the newest things mozilla engages in, so it is no surprise he is one of the volunteers leading WebVR activities in India.

Check his latest reports from the VR Camp Hyderabad  about the A-Frame framework. Also, if you need an inspiration on how to organize a VR Day be sure to look over “A Day of Virtual Reality”. He attended the Mozilla Festival in London and is teaching the Learning WebVR development using A-Frame framework.

Thanks Ram for the amazing work done! Please join us in congratulating Ram on Discourse!


அடுத்து நாம் செய்யவேண்டியவை?
Khaleel Jageer on December 15, 2016 06:07 PM

மொசில்லாவின் பலதரப்பட்ட திட்டங்களில் தமிழகத்தை சேர்ந்த பலரும் பங்களித்து வரும் நிலையில், மொழிபெயர்ப்பில் வெகு சிலரே பங்களிப்பாளர்களாக இருந்து வருகின்றனர். இதில் வருத்தப்பட வேண்டிய அவசியம் இல்லை. காரணம் தாய் மொழியை விடுத்து பிறமொழியை கற்றால் தான் சமூகத்தில் வாழமுடியும் என்று நமது பொதுபுத்தியில் விதைக்கப்பட்டுள்ளது. இதுவே நாம் வாழ்ந்து கொண்டிருக்கும் ஒட்டுமொத்த சமூகத்தின் சிந்தனையும் கூட. மொசில்லா மட்டுமின்றி மற்ற கட்டற்ற மென்பொருள் திட்டங்களிலும் தமிழ் மொழயின் பங்களிப்பாளர்களும், அதன் பயனர்களும் குறைவு என்பது தான் சோகத்திலும் சோகம்.

யாம் அறிந்த மொழிகளிலே தமிழ் மொழிபோல் இனிதாவதெங்கு காணோம்

என்று பாடினான் பாரதி. ஆனால் இன்று சமூகம் மற்றும் சமூகம் சார்ந்த தனிநபரின் சிந்தனையோ வேறு. எனக்கு தமிழ் படிக்க தெரியாது என்று தமிழில் கூறிக்கொள்ளும் அளவிற்க்கு மொழியின் முக்கியத்துவமும், மொழியின் மீதான பற்றும் நம்மவர்களிடத்தே உள்ளது.

இவையாவும் நாம் யோசித்துவிட கூடாது என்று நம்மை ஆண்டவர்கள் கவனத்தில் வைத்து இருந்தார்கள். அவர்களுடன் நாம் கண்மூடித்தனமாக நம்பும் ஊடகங்களும்.

சரி. நிலைமை இவ்வாறு இருக்க நாம் மொழியின் மீதான ஆர்வத்தை மக்களிடத்தே கொண்டு செல்வது சாத்தியமா? அதற்கு நாம் என்ன செய்யவேண்டும்? இதனால் மொழியை நம்மால் காக்க முடியுமா? என கேள்விகள் நம்முல் பல எழலாம்.

என்னிடம் உள்ள ஒரே பதில், மொழியை நாம் அடுத்த கட்டத்தை நோக்கி கொண்டு சென்றாலே அதை அழியாமல் காக்க படலாம்.

ஒரு கட்டற்ற மென்பொருள் பங்களிப்பாளனாக, என்னால் முடிந்தவரையில் தமிழ் மொழிபெயர்ப்புகளில் பங்களித்து வருகின்றேன். இதை இனியும் தொடருவேன்.

ஏன் இனையத்திற்க்கு பங்களிக்க வேண்டும்?

பலத்த தொழில்போட்டி நிலவும் இணைய சந்தையில், பல நிறுவனங்கள் பல கோடிகளை முதலீடு கொண்டு மொழி பெயர்ப்பினை செய்து அவர்களின் சந்தையை விரிவாக்கி வருகின்றனர். இப்படியான சூழலில் நாம் திறந்த மூல மென்பொருளாக, இணையத்தில் இனைய சமத்துவத்திற்க்காக குரல் கொடுத்துவரும் Mozilla Firefox-ன் திட்டங்களுக்கு பங்களிக்கலாம். மேலும் இன்று உலகம் இனையத்தில் சுருங்கிவிட்டது. தமது தேடலை பூர்த்திசெய்யும் எதுவாயினும் மனிதன் அதை ஏற்றுக்கொள்கின்றான். அவ்விடத்தில் நாம் தமிழ் மொழியின் இருப்பை கொண்டுசெல்வது நமது கடமைகளுள் ஒன்று.

சரி? நமது உடனடி திட்டம் என்னவாக இருக்க வேண்டும்?

2017-ல் நமது உடனடி தேவையாக எடுத்துகொண்டு நாம் செய்யவேண்டியது,

  1. Mozilla.org தளங்களைத் தமிழில் மொழிபெயர்ப்பது.
  2. Firefox for Android, Desktop பதிப்புகளின் புதிய முதன்மைத் தொடர்களை மொழிபெயர்ப்பது.
  3. புதிய பங்களிப்பாளர்களை உருவாக்குவது.

இதன் மூலம் நமது நீண்ட நெடிய தேவைகளான,

  1. Firefox உலாவிகளின் தமிழ் இடைமுகப்பு பயன்பாட்டை அதிகரிப்பது.
  2. கல்வி நிறுவனங்களையும், அரசு அலுவலகங்களையும் அனுகி அவர்களுக்கு தமிழ் மொசில்லா உபயோகிப்பது குறித்து பயிற்சி அளித்தல், அவர்களை தொடர்ந்து உபயோகிக்க ஊக்கமளிப்பது.

இவை யாவும் சாத்தியமா?

இதை செய்வதற்கான சாத்தியகூறுகள் அதிகமாக உள்ளது. நாம் அனைவரும் ஒன்றினைந்து செயல்படுவோம்.

நாம் என்று பயன்படுத்தியதற்க்கு காரணம் : தனிமனித சிந்தனையை சமூக சிந்தனையாக மாற்ற வேண்டிய நேரமிது….



Building Mozilla’s Leadership Toolkit – Innovating contribution workflows for curriculum development
Emma on December 15, 2016 12:58 AM

Building Mozilla’s Leadership Toolkit — Innovating contribution workflows for curriculum development

Earlier this year, we proposed a framework for Community Leadership Development at Mozilla. Since then, we’ve iterated on that work : ‘Open, Communicate, Empower, and Build’ are now core competencies guiding content development in Mozilla’s Leadership Toolkit.

As part of our goals for developing excellent content aligned with project and volunteer needs, I’ve been very deliberate and determined… to innovate a contribution model for volunteers with a background in education (professionals, and students), and those willing to invest in the testing of those workshops with their community. Our working group, has been building and testing a workflow as part of our early work. Enormous thanks to :

We’re definitely on our way, and energized with feedback from the Hawaii All Hands, including a contribution: ‘Using Powerful Questions’ from Jane Finette!

Our work is divided into areas of work listed below:

Framework

Based on the original Framework, and with inspiration from Julien Stodd, and the DIY Toolkit we proposed curriculum development under 4 competencies:

Empower

Competencies that help people bring others in, to help others realize and claim their potential through designed opportunity, empathy, diversity and inclusion.

Build

Skills, knowledge and attitudes we develop to effectively, and collaboratively build momentum of positive change they want to see in our communities, on projects and initiatives that matter to Mozilla’s mission.

Open

Open is a way of thinking and being, open is a willingness to share, not only resources, but processes, ideas, thoughts, ways of thinking and operating. Mozilla story, manifesto and way of working.

Communicate

Growing connection and shared vision for advocacy and purpose through strong personal and community narrative. Sharing what we learn, sharing early, sharing often, sharing inclusively.

Content is also categorized according to (evolving) sub-competencies, displayed as stories that help connect people with resources (example below, not on website yet)

Content

Content is prioritized by those skills, knowledge and attitudes identified by Mozilla projects (currently Mozilla Reps, Campus Clubs) as being key to volunteer success — validated through self-assessment and testing. Although content is categorized by competency and sub-competency, we’ve also started to recognize pathways as another method of content categorization. Some examples so far are ‘I Hear You!’, and ‘Presenting Ideas’, as well as pathways focused on Personas like ‘New Mozillian’.

So far we have a number of resources built, with others on their way. As much as possible, we leverage openly licensed OER.

Content Development Workflow

My big aha moment during this process was to stop being prescriptive about the technology, and technology format of curriculum contribution, and instead focus building standards, and processes that support where and how people want to work. Who cares if contributors know markdown, who cares if they know how to submit a pull request. Honestly, it only takes one person to publish content — and they can be positioned at the end of the workflow.

Something I have also learned this year is that ‘open calls’ to test content is almost never successful in obtaining meaningful feedback. Instead holding a 1:1 call with someone willing to test content, demoing the content delivery and then asking them to do the same with one or two people yields higher quality feedback on both the facilitator journey, and the learner.

I’m starting to believe that all workshop content we develop should come with a demo video, or 1:1 coaching that helps the facilitator prepare and ask questions.

Website

Currently, the Leadership Toolkit website is a fork of another, and intended only to demo progress.

Content Delivery

You may ask yourself, what learning formats are you optimizing for? Good question!

Right now, content is a mix of self-study and in-person/workshop-focused — but we intend to be more deliberate about the design moving forward — with thought leadership from Mikko Knotto, we’ll be proposing a standard for content delivery based on this talk from Coursera . I’ll blog about this next.

Stay in Touch!

You can find updates on our work, including how to find us — on the project wiki.


Scrabble by Jacqui Brown

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Let's wrap up 2016 and get ready for 2017
on December 14, 2016 07:39 PM
Another year is slowly coming to an end. This is a regular type of post which I post at the end of...

How Mozillatn #MozillaTN17 Meetup should be
Vitchu on December 10, 2016 04:48 PM

The following post is my views and it doesn’t support views of overall community. My vision towards Mozilla vision is different and it will for sure change to everyone.

When we hear Mozilla we can remember lot of things Firefox browser, Firefox OS, Web literacy and so on. Contributing to internet is so easy we have been doing lot of things sharing about internet basics usage, surfing safely in Internet, making stalls in college fest / tech fest and so on. Everyone will have many thoughts some proudly say they are evangelist ( rarely without knowing about them ). For past few years this has been buzz words and many love to use it.

Mozilla Tamilnadu community started some years back with handful of contributors. They had lor of visions but their contribution are quantifiable and mostly action orientated. Previously many communities had plans to open so many students clubs and establishing names, but problems with these clubs in my experience is they fade away after years. I remember my mentor shared stories of contributors who were there in past and what they did, mostly noticeable people are Naresh & Dwaraknath and I am proud I meet them. Dwaraknath was good technical guy and has organised technical sprints to improve code contributors. Naresh & Gautam have handons experience is starting with sumo contribution, localization and so on. At same Naresh is good coder and security geek and Gautam has good track to improve web literacy in rural areas ( aim to create basic awareness and internet awareness ). They had one thing in common, bring quality contributors than starting random clubs. I remember I got in touch with community during Firefox OS app days, Naresh helped to develop apps using HTML5. At mid of 2013, Firefox OS was one of the big project which brought many contributors easily lot of focus were there contributing to core Firefox OS project, developing FIREFOX OS apps, Firefox marketplace place and reviewers ( proud I am one of reviewer), documentation of Firefox OS API in MDN, helping people with support using SUMO (AOA), writing support docs SUMO KB,  localizing to different languages , finding bugs writing code for automation testing, Marketing about Firefox os training it to different phone manufacturer so they can adopt and do on. In these things many of the areas are not simple  like starting a club, people joined to build themselves. I developed Firefox OS apps  as I wanted to learn more about WebApi, I evangelized it and helped others to code apps so I can learn well in depth about API usage, and it eventually helped me to be a good as App reviewer. I contributed as VP of Tech in Fsa program ( till 2015 June) as I wanted to train other students when they require help in developing apps. All these helped me to be get started as contributor, I did something because I wanted to learn the skills and use it in my real life or professional life, and Mozilla community was a great platform to help me to fulfil my personal goals. Those personal goals in turn came as contributions.

The Main aim of this post is to understand How MozillaTN17 should be

For the first time, our Mozilla Tamilnadu community going to have meetup in coimbatore. It is very high expected and not many sub-communities in India will get this opportunity. We got this due to many contributors  hard effort, personal I have seen contributors who are finding time to bring QA contributors, Women contributors who spent time to pull others and help them get started and much more. I am also excited, I was part of this community, so I feel I am also one of the responsible member in shaping this community. So I am sharing this thoughts.

We have asked our contributors to share a blog post about their plans for next 6 months. One of the main reason is we expect contributors to do a small research on various areas of contribution before they join us, we want everyone who come there Track leaders, long time contributors, contributors who get started in past 6 months and contributors who are going to start their contribution to Mozilla (yes we are also inviting people who have mobilized in other communities). When we have short term goals it motivates us to learn and get us engaged. One of the strong faith I personally have is when we have good motto to do something we can easily get started. When we create a TODO list and that too publicly then we will do it for sure, its more like a promise. So I have done my promise in my previous post

What is the exception in Contributors TODO list

  • If you are going to come for Add-ons team, think how many Add-ons you can develop for next 6 months. Think of ways how you can help our community members add-ons and help to find their bugs.
  • If you are going to come for WebVR, then think how many VR screens can be developed, how creatively you can develop screens and take WebVR community in India to next level.
  • If you are going to apply for Rust, then simply think how you can use Rust for your projects and learn to contribute to servo. Say how many bugs you can solve. And how about replacing it in your daily usage of languages.
  • If you going to Apply for QA team, think how you can start quality assurance. To which Project you can do automation testing. Which automation scripts you can publish.
  • If you are applying for Webcompat, think about how many websites you can test per month, so how many bugs you can submit or you can patches you can do or contact website owners.
  • If you plan to apply for Social Media team, think how can you do growth hacking to MozillaTN, think how you can engage contribution in our social Media platform. Think how you can about open design culture.
  • You may also be interested in MDN, there are lot of articles waiting for contributors to get reviewed or published.

Take any one sample TODO which matches your focus area and write your own Next 6 months plan. There are many areas which I never know, do share about them so we can learn.

Yes seeing your actionable goal now will be super amazing, and this meetup will be more exciting. It will look 50 contributors who are very fast in their action discussion at a same place to protect the web. We can start our contribution be it coding, testing or growth hacking when we finish lay our Roadmap of 2017 at meetup.

Why are your waiting contributors in Tamilnadu,  just prepare your plan and apply for meetup. Lets make this #MozillaTN17 meetup big. Know more about meetup here.



My Contribution focus in the upcoming 2017
Vitchu on December 09, 2016 11:17 PM

Last year many of you might have remembered I shared a sad ending, as Firefox OS have been stopped for Mobiles. It was really one of the bad news and most of the contributors felt they are alone in island. Then I got struck with my personal works and stopped my contributions for 2 months. But contributing to Mozilla & talking with other Mozillians is like sun rise for me, happens daily, since it didnt happen properly somewhat felt bad.

Then I started learning about WebExtensions in late March, and came up with some good post on them

Short Version

  • Learning more about Add-ons (Webextensions Model) to develop, evangelize, create content based on them.
  • 10 Code Patch to various Mozilla Projects by end of April.
  • Mentor new contributors to develop Add-ons and also to connect new contributors with other contributors of their interest.

 

Detailed Version

My whole Focus area for 2017 is going to be Add-ons, my most important priority and contribution will be around this. In late 2016 I got opportunity to join Featured Add-ons Community Board and it will be starting from Jan 2017

  • I will be joining with contributors in Tamilnadu to form Add-ons focus team.
    • This team  will be responsible to bring Featured Add-ons (atleast 2 per month) developed by Contributors in Tamilnadu (also India)
  • Creating local contents and Add-ons API explanation.
    • To develop skills in Add-ons & bringing more WebExtensions I would like to develop at least 1 Add-on per week. List of API’s to follow is available here
    • I would also like to discuss the WebExtensions API in tamil.
    • To Improve myself as Techspeaker I would be starting a series of learning  meetup, offline Meetup in Chennai. Also planning to talk in 2 tech conferences.
  • I started a little bit of JS code contribution to web-ext in June but my code didnt have good quality, so by March my aim is to send atleast 5 PR.
  • Before April I am planning to organize 3 Add-ons community hackathon.
    • Main outcome of hackathon is bring 25 quality developers who can be good evangelist for Add-ons.
  • By June, I will be surely applying for Add-ons Review board (One of my dream).

Test Pilot project is one of the amazing project which I love so much, may be it has close relation with Add-ons.

  • My first Focus for Test Pilot is to drive more traffic, so installations can be increased. Already I am working with Team in MozillaTN who are sharing the amazing features of Test Pilot add-ons and its uses.
  • Second is to contribute to Code base of the add-ons. I love min-vid and Pageshot very much hope I will send 2 Patches to these project by March.

Above are my very personal goals.

But I have a very important community with me, Mozilla Tamilnadu. And shaping this community is more important than my personal goals.

  • Helping to Revamp Mozilla Tamilnadu Website. (Highest Priority).
  • Participating in #MozillaTN17 and engage with other contributors.
  • Connecting contributors with Different pathways ( Expand community with MDN projects, Open Designs and so on..).
  • Engaging with atleast 5 new contributors each month who I have never talked and sharing my pathways where I get started and helping them to connect with other active contributors.


Talk on contributing to Mozilla Marionette
Sanyam Khurana on December 04, 2016 08:23 PM

I've always felt that newbies find it very difficult to get started into any Open Source project. If we talk specifically about code-contribution; which is an essential part of the entire ecosystem, then the no. of people are not enough. I've always found myself surrounded by a bunch of folks who wanted to contribute in Open Source software; and thus asking me questions about how to find bugs, where to get started, etc. One of the most difficult thing they told me is that they don't understand project well enough and thus are not able to recognize on how to get ahead with a particular bug.

I am currently contributing to Mozilla Marionette which is an automation driver for Mozilla's Gecko engine. You can read about my experience on that in blog post Getting started with Marionette & Contributing more to Marionette and Firefox UI Tests. I recently decided to give a talk explaining people about Marionette.

I delivered a talk at PyDelhi Meetup (one of the Open Source group I'm actively volunteering for :) ). The talk was scheduled for November 27, 2016. My talk was from 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM IST. In the end there was a QA session where some people came forward to ask questions.

Here are some photos of the event:

One of the most important thing I felt is people hesitate in asking questions. This is because after the QA was officialy over, a lot of people came to me with specific questions and told that they were hesistant during QA session. So for those folks, just remember:

He who asks a question is a fool for five minutes; he who does not ask a question remains a fool forever. – Chinese Proverb

Other than that, we're all friends :) So, come and clear your doubts! Ask me anything. No one is judging you on the basis of questions you ask. It's more important that you try, rather than the fear of failiure stop you from even taking the first step.

For those who missed the talk, I've tried to process the video and uploaded it on Youtube (That's why this update took so much time).

You can watch the talk on Youtube (https://youtu.be/l1tZaud0GO4)

Your comments are much appreciated. Tell me if this session helped you, or how further sessions could be improved!


Mozilla's Equal Rating Challenge
Sanyam Khurana on November 26, 2016 08:00 AM

The event took place at Hotel Lalit, New Delhi on November 18, 2016. Once again we got a chance to meet Jochai (one of the Mozilla staff) after around 6 months and he recognized me :)

The event was powered by SFLC (Software Freedom Law Centre) & Mozilla. Local community volunteers (Mozpacers) helped with the registration.

The event began at 3:00 PM where Jochai introduced people to the problem on making Internet accessible to everyone. After his kick off speech, there was a panel discussion where this issue was discussed. Jochai Ben-Avie, Mishi Choudhary and Smriti Parsheera were speakers. After the panel discussion, people came forward with their questions and got responses from the panel members.

After that we had tea and a great disccussion with Jochai. We also talked with SFLC team to conduct an event where they can explain about different form to Open Source LISENCE to people and how are they different from each other.

We soon plan to have an integrated event with SFLC team where Mozillians would tell about Open Web and community structuring and they will tell about FOSS Laws.

It was a really good experience all together!


New Reps Council members – Autumn 2016
kpapadea on November 16, 2016 11:34 AM

We are happy to announce that the 4 new council members are fully on-boarded and already taken responsibilities to move the program forward.

A warm welcome to Flore, Alex, Adriano and Michael Also a big thank you and #mozlove to Christos, Shahid  and Arturo for their hard work during their term as Reps Councils Members. Your work is highly appreciated by all the Reps.

The Mozilla Reps Council is the governing body of the Mozilla Reps Program. It provides the general vision of the program and oversees day-to-day operations globally. Currently, 7 volunteers and 2 paid staff sit on the council. Find out more on the ReMo wiki.

Don’t forget to congratulate the new Council members on the Discourse topic!

 


Diversity & Inclusion for Participation – “A Plan for Strategy”
Emma on November 12, 2016 01:17 AM

In the most recent Heartbeat, I consulted with Mozilla’s Diversity & Inclusion lead Larissa Shapiro, and others championing the discussion , about a strategy for D&I in Participation. I’m really excited and passionate about this work, and even though this is very, very early (this is only a plan for a strategy), I wanted to share now for the opportunity of gathering the most feedback.

Note: I’m using screenshots from a presentation, but have included the actual text in image alt-tags for accessibility.

Right now the proposed ‘Plan for a Strategy’ as three phases:

Designing a strategy for D&I will have some unique challenges. We know this. To get started we need to understand where we are now, who we are, why we are as we are — and what attitudes and practices exist that enhance, or restrict our ability to effectively bring in, and sustain the participation of diverse groups.

The first phase is all about gaining insights into these and other important questions through focus groups, interviews and – and existing data.

Insight gathering and research will be focused in these key areas:

By Phase 2 – we’ll have formed a number of important hypothesis for influencing D&I  in investment areas aligned with Mozilla’s overall D&I strategy.  Investment areas are currently proposed to be:

Experimentation is critical to developing a D&I Strategy for Participation.  And although it’s identified here as a single ‘phase’, I envision experimentation, learning and iterating on what we learn – to be  THE  process of building a diverse and inclusive Participation at Mozilla.

Here’s the current timeline:

  1. Feedback on this plan  – Ongoing, but especially useful leading up to December 5th
  2. Phase 1 – Gaining Insights. Begins the week of November 14th leading into the Mozilla All Hands meeting in December.
  3. Phase 2Early Experiment Design -Mozilla All Hands Meeting in December.
  4. Phase 2 – Experiment Design & Implementation  – Remainder of of 2016 into 2017.
  5. Phase 3 – Strategy Development – 2017.

 

I would love to hear your ideas, concerns, feedback on this ‘proposal’ which WILL itself evolve.

 

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Mozilla Rep Mentorship Meeting 2
Sanyam Khurana on November 12, 2016 01:00 AM

Today I had another online meeting with my Mozilla Reps Mentor Biraj from 6:00 PM - 6:30 PM.

Here are the Minutes of Meeting:

  • He reviewed initial set of goals I've set.
  • I told about my current contributions.
  • We discussed about conducting an online and an offline event.
  • I plan to conduct an event teaching people about Marionette and it's usage so that they can further contribute to gecko engine.

You can refer to my intial post for the goals I set as a Mozilla Rep.


SFK’16 in Prishtina, Kosovo – Report
elioqoshi on November 11, 2016 06:11 PM

The Balkans is a unique region. With centuries of complex history behind it, Balkan countries show interesting dynamics and cultural differences across its territories. This is also noticeable in the tech scene. With no particular famous tech hub in the Balkan countries, the tech scene is relatively decentralized compared to Western European countries (London, Berlin, Paris etc). Due to this, there are many opportunities which haven’t been fully taken advantage of yet, but which start to emerge slowly in the past couple of years. There is an interesting article about this from a friend and colleague of mine, Chris Ward, during his stay in Albania some months ago.

With Kosovo declaring Independence in early 2008, things have changed for Kosovars and Albanians very quickly. With this breeze of fresh air, many new initiatives were born as well, among them the local FLOSSK Community (Free Libre Open Source Kosova). With a complete inexistence of Free & Open Source initiatives in Kosovo & Albania at that time, it has been a pioneering effort locally for all things Free & Open Source. Its initial impact has influenced the local tech scene so much that FLOSSK has served as an inspiration for our local Open Labs hackerspace community in Tirana, Albania.

The roots of SFK

One of the milestones FLOSSK prides itself with is SFK (Software Freedom Kosova), an annual conference created as a meeting place for all Free Software enthusiasts in the region to cultivate the local community and drive their values forward locally. On a practical note, it aimed to offer people a local alternative to conferences abroad, as many were unable to travel far from home due to costs and visa issues (which is still a huge problem).

With the first edition having taken place in 2009, SFK 2016 is now in its 7th edition (there was no SFK in 2015). In its early days it was one of the few bigger open source conferences in the region, which many other communities looked up to.

With 2016, it was time for a new edition of SFK. As 2015’s edition was canceled due to lack of time, many people happily awaited the return of the conference this year, including me.

Mingling in

As a Mozilla Tech Speaker, I got my session approved and together with Gabriel and Giannis we would facilitate the Mozilla presence at the conference. I would arrive on the 2nd day of the conference, due to being in Munich, Germany for Push Conference the 2 days before. Apart my taxi driver not knowing the Venue (it was a bit outside the city) my travel went smooth and I also gave an impromptu Fedora Badges workshop only minutes after I arrived.

I was quite disappointed with the number of attendees when I arrived. Although, I don’t blame the organizers for that, as there are only 3 people behind the conference this year (apart the volunteers) the tracks and venue was ideal for 300 people at the same time. It was however overkill for 100-150 people who were there at the same time. A more dense event with less tracks would be beneficial. No need to have 3 tracks when already small groups of people get even more fragmented.

Photo by Kreshnik Ukiqi CC-BY-SA

On the last day, there was also a Workshop track at Prishtina Hackerspace, which was 500m far away from the venue. While being relatively close by, it still contributes to people going different paths. This is already annoying at a huge conference like FOSDEM, where everything is in the same campus anyway. Let’s avoid this next time I’d suggest.

Anyway, I was happy and proud that over 15 people from Open Labs coordinated their trip to SFK’16. It’s great to see the community growing steadily and the Open Labs crew definitely held the morale high during the time at the conference.

I had a workshop about Mozilla Open Design (surprise surprise!), introducing the new branding within Mozilla, the GitHub repo where people could help and/or request designs and last but not least, the Open Innovation Toolkit which we recently launched (thanks to Henrik, who introduced me to it face-to-face in Munich the days before). The workshop ennded up being full, with over 25 people participating (mind you, many sessions ended up being almost empty, due to the high fragmentation and relatively low attendance during the conference). I expected to encounter more questions and debates during my workshop, however attendees were relatively passive, which made me feel like I was talking too much at some point.

Having said that, I always try to have a casual and conversational approach when speaking or holding a workshop, to allow attendees to familiarize themselves quickly. A little bit of humor sprinkles on top helps as well.

We also held an impromptu Mozilla meetup, where two new contributors joined and Giannis and me advised them how we could work together. I have been seeing the 1:1 approach work quite well, whereas a more “top-down” facilitation process might reach more potential contributors, but the success rate being much lower.

Bonus: Conference Visual Identity

Something which you might not know, is that I had the pleasure to design the visual identity and branding of the conference this year. FLOSSK approached me via my startup Ura, to request design help for this year’s edition of SFK. Traditionally, SFK has used the FLOSSK Logo in its branding throughout the years, so I suggested to step up the game here and create a logo for the conference itself (a dedicated post to the process behind it is coming soon).

The concept behind it was simple. If a crow would represent FLOSSK, what would represent FLOSSK’s conference? A crow feather, of course. Additionally, my thinking was that during these community organized conferences, a lot of BoF (Birds of a Feather) sessions take place, so I found the play on words quite catchy.

For the posters and banners I used Public Domain photos of crows to accompany the branding of the conference. Gotta love Unsplash.

I plan to upload the source files to GitHub soon, under a Creative Commons license as well.

Conclusion

It’s good to be in Prishtina, as a lot of things feel familiar, yet different. I had a warm fuzzy feeling to be with our local community from Open Labs Hackerspace, as this was the first time so many of us (over 15) were traveling together. The conference itself was a bit underwhelming, or maybe I’m used to people running around like crazy at bigger conferences? Maybe.

It was good to see another edition of SFK after 2 years, but I would like to see more people investing time and efforts into it to deliver an experience as back in the days. Less but more focused content next year.

Summary

Name: SFK’16
Edition: 7th
Attendees: ~200 (total)
Speakers: 40
Tracks: 3
Days: 3
Booths: ~7

Pros:

  • International speakers
  • Venue was well equipped
  • Solid after parties
  • Good networking with fellow speakers before
  • Wifi was great

Cons:

  • Attendance was quite lower than expected
  • 3 days and 3 tracks for the size of the event is too much
  • Venue at the 2nd day was way out of the city
  • Food and drinks were not organized well

 

The post SFK’16 in Prishtina, Kosovo – Report appeared first on Elio's Corner.


Rep of the Month – October 2016
mkohler on November 10, 2016 03:43 PM

Hossain al Ikram is a passionate contributor from Bangladesh community. He is frontrunner for QA community from past two years and has been setting examples of remarkable leadership and value contribution under several functional areas. Ikram has shown great potential and he is proving his mettle at every instance.

He is actively mentoring people from different countries for QA initiative, He recently helped Indian community in setting up QA team. He also organized MozActivate campaign in Bangladesh. Check some examples QA events from Rajshahi, Sylhet, Chittagong , mentoring in Varenda or mentoring in Rajshahi. Also he started a ToT for WebCompat with more editions in November. You can read about his awesome work on his website.


Geraldo has been one of the most active members in Brazilian community over the last 3 months. Helping to coordinate Mozilla presence at FISL (one of the biggest OpenSource events in Brazil), engaging with the community, running events like Sao Paulo workday , or Latinoware, and even assisting to MozFest!

He is a very engaged mozillian, that also helps run events for Webcompat and SUMO hackatons. This November, you will see Geraldo doing more of his stuff in the upcoming events, promoting Mozilla mission, being an awesome Mozilla Club member, and spreading some #mozlove. Be sure to check his Medium account for more news about his work!

Please join us in congratulating them as Reps of the Month for October 2016!


Reps Program Objectives – Q4 2016
mkohler on November 04, 2016 01:10 PM

With “RepsNext” we increased alignment between the Reps program and the Participation team. The main outcome is setting quarterly Objectives and Key Results together. This enables all Reps to see which contributions have a direct link to the Participation team . Of course, Reps are welcome to keep doing amazing work in other areas.

Objective 1 A focus set of relevant training and learning opportunities for Reps are systematized and they regularly access these opportunities to be more effective in their contributions and as a result providing more impact to Mozilla’s main initiatives.
KR1 Core mobilizers who took the leadership training report being more effective to support Mozilla by actively using their new skills.
KR2 Mobilizers from at least 90% of our (10) regions are interested in the training
KR3 80% of the people who took coaching training report having used these new skills in their volunteer work and report being more effective
KR4 Gatherings toolkit quality is enough for volunteers to drive impactful gatherings on their own.
Objective 2 Reps is the program for most core volunteers where many communities feel their voice represented and influencing the organization, and where mozillians join to be more aligned, grow their skills and be more impactful in mobilizing others.
KR1 Communities are making Activate Mozilla successful by running 100 activities.
KR2 30% more effectiveness (time and positive sentiment) on budget process
KR3 Initial material for Reps Resources track foundation is created.
KR4 Plan for integrating all efforts (Leadership, Coaching, Regional, Resources) into Reps structure delivered.
KR5 There is an implementation plan in place to decrease the time between an application and the onboarding by at least 50% compared to H1 2016.
KR6 We have at least 3 different solid ideas around Recognition in place and started at least one experiment.

Which of the above objectives are you most interested in? What key result would you like to hear more about? What do you find intriguing? Which thoughts cross your mind upon reading this?

Let’s keep the conversation going! Please provide your comments in Discourse.


On Mozilla’s identity and access management (IAM) initiatives
Henrik Mitsch on November 03, 2016 02:45 PM

(Cross-post from Mozilla’s discourse.)

Introduction

This document describes some of Mozilla’s activities in response to the decommissioning of Persona. It describes the change taking place in many of our web properties. Additionally the document provides a short overview on Mozilla’s broader identity and access management (IAM) initiatives.

Summary (TL;DR)
  • Persona will be decommissioned on NOV 30, 2016.
  • Our new authentication provider is built with Auth0 at its core.
  • All Participation Systems properties (reps.mozilla.org, mozillians.org, moderator.mozilla.org and others) will be using Auth0 moving forward.
  • Using this new authentication provider, Mozilla will transition many of its web properties that use Persona today to provide both
    • password-less email login for all profiles on Mozillians.org and
    • LDAP login for staff.
    • Additionally, some web properties will offer select social logins (e.g. Google, GitHub).
  • Moving into 2017, Mozillians.org will be fully integrated with Mozilla’s LDAP. This will enable volunteers and paid staff to collaborate using some of the same platforms and tools.

Persona Replacement (aka IAM Package B)

As previously mentioned on mozilla.dev.identity [Jan 12 2016 and Oct 13 2016], Persona is slated for decommissioning on November 30th, 2016.

Mozilla will not offer a public-facing authentication service like Persona after November 30th. Information for website owners to migrate their sites away from persona.org can be found on the wiki.

Many of Mozilla’s web properties (some of them listed below) will replace Persona with a new authentication provider based on Auth0. This means that Mozillians will be able to authenticate on many Mozilla sites using password-less email login, or select social logins (e.g. Google, GitHub). Staff members can continue to use their LDAP credentials on these sites. This transition includes, but is not limited to: Mozillians.org, Discourse, Moderator, Reps Portal, and Air Mozilla.

For the web properties maintained by the Participation Systems team (Discourse, Moderator, Mozillians.org, Reps Portal) this bucket of work is often referred to as “IAM Package B” and can be tracked on the team’s Kanban board. Package A was a technical proof of concept which successfully ended in September 2016.

Mozillians.org LDAP Integration (aka IAM Package C)

Looking towards 2017 we plan to integrate Mozillians.org with LDAP, to facilitate group management and access control for both paid staff and volunteers. This endeavor is often referred to as “IAM Package C”. Connecting these two systems will allow us to offer a single access management system for all Mozillians, volunteers as well as paid staff. We are still designing this new system and will share additional details in the coming months.

This groundwork will eventually allow us to differentiate collaboration tools’ access levels based on project needs instead of employment status. Think about the ability to provide document access to a hybrid project group of volunteer and staff contributors. This is a natural next step in our work as a radically participatory organization.

Feedback welcome!

This article hopefully provided insight into Mozilla’s currently running and planned activities around identity and access management. We invite you to continue the conversation at this discourse post.



Mozilla Campus Clubs @ Grace Hopper Open Source Day
Emma on October 28, 2016 07:57 PM

Mozilla Campus Clubs @ Grace Hopper Open Source Day

Open Source Day at Grace Hopper was my absolute, most favourite, ‘conference thing’ I did last year, and it was with little hesitation that I got involved again for the 2016 version.

Before I say anymore I want to acknowledge the amazing work of two volunteers in making our day successful.

  • Semirah Dolan, who joined me in Houston to run a session that build a VR activity for Campus Clubs, and who truly leads by example — student leadership and activism in open source.
  • Safwan Rahman, who (no exaggeration) saved my day, by pulled together a Python project, working with me to the last minute to get it right.

Also thanks to my colleague Larissa Shapiro for bringing her wisdom and empathy into the discussion & brainstorming portion of the program.


This year we brought Campus Clubs for contribution. Unlike last year, where we jumped right into code, we spent time talking about Mozilla, our mission and Campus Clubs — and introduced three problem statements for the day.

  • Opportunities & Barriers: What makes a good open source experience?
  • How do we design a program that is inclusive of technical AND non-technical people?
  • What incentivizes students on Campus to engage in clubs at the intersection of technology and activism?

As a group, we did some rapid brainstorming to identify who on campus would be interested in FOSS participation. We were fortunate with this group , to have mostly students and also a professor who includes Mozilla participation in her curriculum!

What emerged where 5 distinct audiences: Wide-eyed Freshman (not spoken for yet), Professors /Lab Techs, Other Clubs, Non-technical majors(business, language-arts, journalism, bio-medical engineer) and of course computer science students.

Next — we did some rapid brainstorming on motive, and incentive for getting and saying involved in Open Source.

Employment and ‘Doing Good’ surfaced as the primary motivation with some interesting considerations like ‘Connecting with like-minded people’, fun and skill building surfaced by many. Swag(t-shirts) received only one mention.

We did the same exercise — this time thinking about barriers, and deterrents for FOSS participation.

Lack of invitation, opportunity, familiarity and clarity in HOW to get involved — topped the list of barriers. ‘Lack of Confidence’ (shy, scared, intimidation) was identified by the majority of participants.

Another trend focused on poor response times, limited diversity, and unwelcome channels .

I suspected many women were speaking of their own experiences. I have no doubt that young women do feel scared, and intimidated just stepping through the front door.

Getting involved in clubs with goals intersecting both technology and advocacy seems to resonate on a number of levels : skill building, ‘trying something new’, innovation, mentorship and fun.

I put a heart around a ‘ship it’ postit — not knowing exactly the context — loved the idea of getting things done as a motivation for joining clubs!

What did we build?

We asked people to join in one of two groups: The first focused on building our Personas into a Python/Django framework (for the coders in the room). I kept this project super simple, given the codeathon only given the limited time, and the majority of work was setting up Python locally, and updating Python code for the template we created.

The second, non-technical activity focused on building a VR activity for Campus Clubs using Mozilla’s AFrame. The group identified a Person (Dr. Database), and a VR project they might want to build: ‘Wire your iOven before it explodes’. They documented the opportunities, barriers and workshops that might form a VR activity for clubs and submitted their work as a PR.

The VR activity led by Semirah was a hit, probably more for how excited people were to learn about AFrame — one participant pledging excitement to home and learn and play more with VR. I think that was the win of the day — seeing participants recognize the potential of the technology they were working with — a signal that bringing AFrame VR activities to Campus will inspire creativity and innovation for the open web.

Overall, I think the day went well. Although the ‘timing’ of the event could have been better — scheduled exactly at the same time as the Open Source track was problematic for many (myself included) who would have liked to attend or chaired those sessions. Many participants did leave for sessions, or for interviews setup in the career fair. I was happy to see everyone return as well though.

As with last year, the most compelling part of the day was meeting, and working along side a group of smart, smart women — this time on the cause of mobilizing students on campus for the open web.


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Video Interview for FOSS Force
on October 24, 2016 05:51 AM
Last week I had the pleasure to be a guest of FOSS Force. FOSS Force is a news site offering...

Back at the Front at #push16
Henrik Mitsch on October 21, 2016 05:00 PM

During the last two days Mozilla had a booth at push.conference 2016 in Munich. Push unites creative coding and user experience design, by offering a platform for designers, developers and UX professionals.

Elio, George and I represented Mozilla. To put it in George’s words:

Among the things we presented to booth visitors were:

Here’s what I learned this week:

  • Be there, talk and -most importantly- listen to people. It’s exhaustive and rewarding. Totally awesome.
  • On the Innovation Toolkit:
    • The toolkit allows us to open a conversation with a whole range of new (potential) contributors: experience designers, visual designers, and many other creative types.
    • We are missing a creative commons content license. This is a bug and will hopefully be fixed soon.
    • People have not heard of the toolkit yet. We need to be louder about it.
    • Students and higher-education teachers are really interested in this.
    • Seasoned professionals identified it as a great “quick reference” source.
    • We need to become better at explaining WHY Mozilla has created this innovation toolkit and WHAT’s the Mozilla’iary aspect of the toolkit and HOW it is used inside and outside Mozilla.
  • On the EU Copyright Campaign: People like it. Many can’t believe how broken current copyright rules are.
  • On the Equal Rating innovation challenge: Again, people really like the idea. Students and university teaching staff are very receptive on potentially running creative projects around that topic.
  • On the Mozilla Festival: It would be great to get the word out to more designers and UX professionals to join us at #MozFest.

Overall, a great couple of days.

Update: Elio’s post has some additional details on #push16 itself.



New Reps mentors, a history and roadmap
deimidis on October 21, 2016 01:00 PM

Last quarter Reps council working with Participation Team begun to work in changes on the Rep program, one of them was to start new Reps Mentors work. I wrote about this project before, if you are interested in this part of the history.

We just end the first cohort training, with 11 new mentors and 1 from the existing mentors group. And now, they are working with their mentees, something that let us welcome new Reps again. We select 20 people from the list of applicants, and we ask for more patience to the people that still have their applications pending.

What we have done

The training is a mix of readings and live calls. We create a guide that compile information from books and blog post from different resources, and in the live calls, we discuss that content and had some exercises to practice the learnings.

This training last for one month and a half, and just before ending it, I had conversations with all the new Reps mentors to have feedback on the training, and which things needs to be modified. The main concern was that the training seems unstructured and sometimes they weren’t sure about what we were requesting from them.

Now, they begun to work with their mentees, having their first interviews, helping them to identify their goals in the near future, building their path inside the community. And with the creation of the Review Team, these Coach don’t need to review budget and swag request for them. Just focus on their personal development and how they could be even more useful for their communities.

But, one of the main questions that we still have is: how we can measure the utility and usage of this training? How can we know that Mentors are using these techniques and if these are useful for them in their work with the mentees?

If you have ideas, please let us know

What we will do in the near future

This week we started the second cohort of the project. This time, we focus on existing Mentors, rather than new ones. We made a call for applications and now we have 12 new candidates, that will begin their training soon.

This training will have more structure, and more exercises. Also, we will be opening the training for Reps (not Mentors) to bring these tools to more people. And we are preparing a second version of the website, that will be available for everyone that want to read it.

We will be using the last part of this quarter to discuss how to continue this project in 2017. Our idea is that with all this people trained, we could scale faster (with more people helping on giving training and updating content and resources).

If you want to leave comments, please us this Discourse topic


Rep of the Month – September 2016
mkohler on October 20, 2016 10:59 AM

Please join us in congratulating Mijanur Rahman Rayhan, Rep of the Month for September 2016!

Mijanur is a Mozilla Rep and Tech Speaker from Sylhet, Bangladesh. With his diverse knowledge he organized hackathons around Connected Devices and held a Web Compatibility event to find differences in different browsers.

    

Mijanur proved himself as a very active Mozillian through his different activities and work with different communities. With his patience and consistency to reach his goals he is always ready and prepared for these. He showed commitment to the Reps program and his proactive spirit these last elections by running as a nominee for the Cohort position in Reps Council.

Be sure to follow his activities as he continues the activate series with a Rust workshop, Dive Into Rust events, Firefox Testpilot MozCoffees, Web Compatibility Sprint and Privacy and Security seminar with Bangladesh Police!


VR Camp – An event for building community around WebVR in India
Ram on October 19, 2016 09:37 PM
My journey to Virtual Reality started when I first jumped into WebVR for the Explorer program of my company Arcesium. As part of this program explored WebVR for building VR content on the web and developed a sample VR experience and a VR tour of my office  using A-Frame (read here my experience to get … Continue reading

Mozilla @StoryMirror Youth Creative Conclave
Sanyam Khurana on October 15, 2016 04:00 PM

We had an amazing event scheduled on October 8, 2016 at Hansraj college in Delhi University. I reached the venue at 10:00 AM where I found Anup and other Mozillians preparing for the event.

We had three talks scheduled. First one was by Anup; where he introducted people to Mozilla and world of Open Source. We discussed about Open Web and privacy issues; and the role of Mozilla is shaping the web.

Next session was taken by me where we discussed about DVCS (Distributed Version Control System) Git which is used in almost every other software product for versioning purposes.

Last session was taken by Rajeev where he discussed about local community Mozilla Delhi (Mozpacers) and how people can join in and learn.

After the event there were a lot of students coming to learn about "How to contribute in Open Source". Many of them inquired about contributing code to Open Source projects. I guided them the best I could and referred them to resources.

The event was a great success :)


Goals as a Mozilla Rep for fourth quarter of 2016!
Sanyam Khurana on October 11, 2016 09:12 PM

I was given this task by my mentor to write down my goals as a Mozilla Rep and then track down my activities every quarter to know where I'm heading.

So, for the last quarter of 2016, the areas where I'd be focusing on are the following:

  • Contribute code actively & extensively in one of the modules of Mozilla's gecko engine.
  • Learn about different tracks on Activate Mozilla Campaign and spread awareness among others.
  • Improve upon my public speaking skills; giving back knowledge to the community.
  • Motivate & help others to contribute to Mozilla.
  • Advance deeper into leadership startegies and techniques.

I hope that in this quarter, I'll be able to work through majority of goals mentioned above.

After the end of the quarter, I'll track my progress through the above checklist.


[Slide Deck] Mozilla & Connected Devices
Bob on October 08, 2016 01:47 PM

As promised to those who attended my talks these past few days, here’s my slide deck on Mozilla & Connected Devices. I do hope that you learned something from my talk. Stay awesome. If you have any questions, please feel free to leave a comment in this post. Maraming salamat po!

The post [Slide Deck] Mozilla & Connected Devices appeared first on Bob Reyes Dot Com.


Introducing Regional Coaches
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on October 03, 2016 12:13 PM

As a way to amplify the Participation’s team focused support to communities, we have created a project called Regional Coaches.

Reps Regional coaches project aims to bring support to all Mozilla local communities around the world thanks to a group of excellent core contributors who will be talking with these communities and coordinating with the Reps program and the Participation team.

We divided the world into 10 regions, and selected 2 regional coaches to take care of the countries in these regions.

  • Region 1: USA, Canada
  • Region 2: Mexico, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Panama, Nicaragua, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, Chile, Argentina, Cuba
  • Region 3: Ireland, UK, France, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Sweden, Lithuania, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia, Czech Republic.
  • Region 4: Hungary, Albania, Kosovo, Serbia, Bulgaria, Macedonia, Greece, Romania, Croatia, Bosnia, Montenegro, Ukraine, Russia, Israel
  • Region 5: Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt, Jordan, Turkey, Palestine, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Iran, Morocco
  • Region 6: Cameroon, Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Senegal, Ivory Coast, Ghana
  • Region 7: Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Madagascar, Mauritius, Zimbabwe, Botswana
  • Region 8: China, Taiwan, Bangladesh, Japan
  • Region 9: India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Myanmar
  • Region 10: Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, Australia, New Zealand.

These regional coaches are not a power structure nor a decision maker, they are there to listen to the communities and establish a 2-way communication to:

  • Develop a clear view of local communities status, problems, needs.
  • Help local communities surface any issues or concerns.
  • Provide guidance/coaching on Mozilla’s goals to local communities.
  • Run regular check-ins with communities and volunteers in the region.
  • Coordinate with the rest of regional coaches on a common protocol, best practices.
  • Be a bridge between communities in the same region.

We want communities to be better integrated with the rest of the org, not just to be aligned with the current organizational needs but also to allow them to be more involved in shaping the strategy and vision for Mozilla and work together with staff as a team, as One Mozilla.

We would like to ask all Reps and mozillians to support our Regional Coaches, helping them to meet communities and work with them. This project is key for bringing support to everyone, amplifying the strategy, vision and work that we have been doing from the Reps program and the Participation team.

Current status

We have on-boarded 18 regional coaches to bring support to 87 countries (wow!) around the world. Currently they have started to contact local communities and hold video meetings with all of them.

What have we learned so far?

Mozilla communities are very diverse, and their structure and activity status is very different. Also, there is a need for alignment with the current projects and focus activities around Mozilla and work to encourage mozillians to get involved in shaping the future.

In region 1, there are no big formal communities and mozillians are working as individuals or city-level groups. The challenge here is to get everyone together.

In region 2 there are a lot of communities, some of them currently re-inventing themselves to align better with focus initiatives. There is a huge potential here.

Region 3 is where the oldest communities started, and there is big difference between the old and the emerging ones. The challenge is to get the old ones to the same level of diverse activity and alignment as the new ones.

In region 4 the challenge is to re-activate or start communities in small countries.

Region 5 has been active for a long time, focused mainly in localization. How to align with new emerging focus areas is the main challenge here.

Region 6 and 7 are also very diverse, huge potential, a lot of energy. Getting mozillians supercharged again after Firefox OS era is the big challenge.

Region 8 has some big and active communities (like Bangladesh and Taiwan) and a lot of individuals working as small groups in other countries. The challenge is to bring alignment and get the groups together.

In region 9 the challenge is to bring the huge activity and re-organization Indian communities are doing to nearby countries. Specially the ones who are not fully aligned with the new environment Mozilla is in today.

Region 10 has a couple of big active communities. The challenge is how to expand this to other countries where Mozilla has never had community presence or communities are no longer active.

Comments, feedback? We want to hear from you on Mozilla’s discourse forum.


FrOSCon 2016 in Bonn, Germany – Report
elioqoshi on September 30, 2016 04:17 PM

The last weeks have been pretty exciting speaking-wise. Within a month I got to visit Germany three times, kicking off this tour with Bonn in Nord-Rhein Westfalia of Germany. It was good to be back in the area after more than 5 years. Having spent 8 years of my childhood in that part of Germany, gives me a certain flavor of nostalgia visiting it. Funny thing is, I will be visiting Germany again in a few days.


Anyway, back to business. I was happy to be talking at FrOSCon (Free Open Source Conference) in Bonn about Mozilla Open Design. FrOSCon is one of the biggest Free & Open Source conferences in Germany, attracting more than 1500 attendees throughout 2 days of multi-track activities. It’s inspired by FOSDEM and has certain elements resembling it, although it features a little more of a corporate sponsor environment, which I personally support, as we need to break the notion of open source only being able to be Free as in free beer.

My talk was in the morning of the 2nd day, so I had some time to kill off and enjoy the conference. One thing I liked about FrOSCon was how interactive the booths were. Most conversations would happen there and it was a great meeting spot to get to know new people. It was especially great to meet up with Jos Poortvliet from Nextcloud and Christoph Wichert from Fedora with which I had some really insightful chats during the conference.

With Jos from Nextcloud

Unfortunately I had few attendees in my talk, due to being the first one speaking on the 2nd day (there was a party the night before, do I need to say more). However the talk was recorded by the CCC Crew and can be found on my FrOSCon speaker profile. I do think that Mozilla (and Fedora as well) need to be present with a booth next year,  so I definitely look forward to that. On another note, I hoped there would be some group chat for us speakers, as I was not able to mingle in that much at the conference with fellow speakers. In my past experience, having the speakers mingle in with each other before the conference, sets a really good tone for the event.

Summary

Name: FrOSCon 11
Edition: 11th
Attendees: ~1500 (total)
Speakers: 117
Tracks: 8
Days: 2
Booths: ~50
Pros:

  • Great diversity of technical and non-technical talks.
  • Very clear agenda with handouts
  • Interactive and highly interesting booths
  • Advanced infrastructure
  • Lots of food, snacks and drinks
  • Kids Hacking sessions

Cons:

  • No introduction among speakers before the conference (was hard to network)
  • Poorly communicated after-party 2nd day

 

The post FrOSCon 2016 in Bonn, Germany – Report appeared first on Elio's Corner.


Mozilla Rep Mentorship Meeting 1
Sanyam Khurana on September 21, 2016 04:00 PM

Just had the very first Mozilla Rep Mentorship e-meet today. It was scheduled to be on 21/09/16 from 9:30 PM IST to 10:00 PM IST. But I reached home early and it was held from 9:00 PM to 9:30 PM IST.

Here are the Minutes of Meeting:

  • Mentor welcomed to Mozilla Reps.

  • Mentor introduced himself and told about his contribution areas

  • I introduced myself and told about my current contribution areas

  • A little discussion on Reps Next

  • Asked a few questions like
    • Why you joined Mozilla Reps?
    • What is the motivation behind joining Mozilla?
    • Since how much time you're contributing to Mozilla and in which areas?
    • What are your personal goals for being Mozilla Rep?
    • What are the community goals for being Mozilla Rep?
  • The mentorship would be for 1 year and for first three months we'll be focussing on developing personal skills and little bit on community goals.

  • Post that we'll be focussing majorly on community goals (on both local and global level); organising events etc.

  • I was given task to submit personal and community goals in next 20-30 days

  • These would be updated in every quarter; and would be worked upon.

I hope to learn more about Mozilla, it's product and Open Web through this program. Meanwhile I'm also contributing to Marionette.


Becoming a Mozilla Representative
Sanyam Khurana on September 21, 2016 09:23 AM

Okay, this was kind of surprising. I applied for Mozilla Reps around 4 months ago but my application was put on hold since at that time, since Mozilla was revamping the Mozilla Reps program as Reps Next and there were not enough mentors available.

It so happened today, that I got a mail today in the morning titled "Welcome to Reps Program!"

I was shocked, opened it up and there I got the news that I'm now a Mozilla Rep and was assigned a mentor under whom I'll be working for next 1 year. I've been contributing to Mozilla from more than 1.5 year(s) now. You can get a glimpse of my journey here.

Reps Next program majorly focuses on improving personal skills of the candidate. It's completely revamped version of Mozilla Reps Program and you can know more about it here.

I've a meeting scheduled with my mentor today at 9:30 PM IST and I'll update about the same in another blog post.


A-Frame experience in a nutshell
Ram on September 21, 2016 01:03 AM
Lately, I have been developing with A-Frame, a web framework for VR development on web. You can checkout my blogpost on VR, WebVR & A-Frame to read basics. I played with different components and capabilities of A-Frame in my VR-Ram repository which is deployed at gh-pages. It was really easy to get started with A-Frame. … Continue reading

A-Frame for VR development on Web
Ram on September 21, 2016 12:52 AM
Virtual Reality: Virtual reality is the technology that can simulate a user’s physical presence in a realistic virtual environment. Virtual reality has been creating a lot of buzz for quite some time now. Oculus Rift & Google Cardboard were the early platforms whose launches made developers & consumers realize VR’s practical potential. VR is being … Continue reading

MozActivate events at Coimbatore
Vitchu on September 19, 2016 12:30 AM

A month before Paarthibalaji asked for event at his college for software freedom day. It was like a long time planning to introduce more about test pilot in his college. We ( Karthikeyan , vignesh, khaleel, and paarthibalaji) started planning this long back. It is one of big event happening inside Tamilnadu.  In another side Prashanth also wanted to initiate Mozilla community related club activities in his college. Both of them are active contributors who are also amazing students in their respective college. Prashanth is more active with respect to quality assurance based activities and paarthibalaji contributes more on IoT track. 

Saturday was really a big day very big schedule. Paarthi woke up early and waited for us in the bus stand. Khaleel, me and Karthik joined him and reached his college. His college has really good ambience and his friends are very friendly. We started the event around 10:30, felt bit late. Then Khaleel was giving introduction about FOSS. And Karthik was getting ready for his talks about Mozilla clubs & web vr.  Parallelly myself & vignesh went to lab. Vignesh was setting up the  IoT kits he got, parallelly Myself and other 4 contributors who are also part of weeks of contribution started installing latest Firefox nightly in around 40+ computers and we opened Mozillatn website, so it will be helpful to know other participants for test pilot installation.


Check out @mozillaTN’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/mozillaTN/status/777046649080197120?s=09

Then Karthik helped students to know more about Mozilla campus clubs. Unfortunately due to lack of proper internet connectivity in seminar Hall he was not able to show webvr demo. Then myself and Karthik left SNS and started to SKCET. We were bit late due to huge traffic in the city. After grand lunch we started our session.

Before reached college, Prashanth has already Installed Firefox nightly in 50+ machine and he has also installed webcompat addon.

The first session we had there was how I get started with Mozilla community and how it impacted me personally. I am always very excited to say how I started and where I am now. 

Then Karthik started about Mozilla campus club. Lot of students were very enthusiastic to know more about it and opportunities it have. We then had small Q&A session .

I was very amazed to see the huge crowd (75+) with lot of energy. After this we started towards lab. 

In lab the plan was to introduce more about Firefox test pilot and webcompat in parallel Karthik will sharing about Mozvr will people finding bugs in website. 


We had installed add-ons first and we’re explaining how each and every add-ons helping me personally to improve my browser usage experience. Then we started with webcompat part, share how to find a bugs how we can report and what all contributions we can do. Students started filling bugs they found in the websites. Some of them filled bug in Mozillatn website. 

While students filling bugs Karthik was introducing them to webvr project. Some 10 students missed chance to learn but at same time there were 20+ students who stayed for some more time and was learning more on webvr and seeing the demo.

After this we started for small get together arranged for contributors around Coimbatore. We had some discussion on Mozilla Tamilnadu growth, bringing more evangelist, and some updating Mozillatn wiki pages about all events happening around. 


It was really a very big day and meet lot of new amazing people. Soon we will be pinging them back to share slides and get feedback about events and helping them to board into community. 



The Web is in danger, copyright reform can break the Internet.
on September 15, 2016 10:00 AM
Basic copyright laws and enforcements have been in effect for hundreds of years. Let’s go back in...

Overwhelming Response
Henrik Mitsch on September 09, 2016 07:58 AM

This is the end of week 1 as Mozilla employee. Here’s What I learned This Week

An Overwhelmingly Positive Response by Mozilla Reps

Before joining Mozilla, I sent a message to all Mozilla Reps asking for their opinion on my role in this hybrid volunteer-and-staff-driven community empowerment program:

Dear Reps,
Dear Mentees,
Dear Council,
Fellow Peers,

on Monday 05 Sept, 2016 I will become a Mozilla employee. Following almost 15 years as a volunteer Mozillian I was offered the opportunity to take this new perspective on the Mozilla Project. My job title is Participation Strategist and I am part of the Participation team reporting to George.

At this moment I hold various roles in the Reps Program:
– Rep
– Mentor
– Module Peer

In my role as a Reps Peer, I have aimed to serve the ReMo program by setting direction and execution on strategic questions.

Moving forward, I’d like to continue contributing to ReMo. I anticipate that my actions will be influenced by the fact that I am a staff Mozillian. Of course I hope that this “bias” will be positive for Reps. At the same time I accept that people are sceptic of too much employee involvement in the program.

For this reason I put my roles in the ReMo program at your disposition. If anybody wants to veto against me being in any or all of the above mentioned three roles, please send a message to our Module Owner Ioana (in CC) and she will take the necessary action ensuring your privacy.

Let’s keep rocking the Open Web.

Always at your service,
Henrik
Mozilla Rep, Mentor, Peer and soon employee

The answers blew me away. There were responses from many parts of the world congratulating me on becoming Mozilla staff. A huge thank you to the Reps from Uganda, Germany, Bangladesh, Taiwan, Malaysia, India, Hong Kong, Mauritius, Ivory Coast, US, Venezuela, Belgium, Tunisia, France, Italy and many others.

An Overwhelming Positive Response on Social Media

Also, as soon as I tweeted and posted a Facebook update, lots of positive feedback arrived.

To all of you who thought of me and dropped me a line: Thank you! I am blessed to be serving our mission to ensure the Internet is a global public resource, open and accessible to all.



Open Source nostalgia — Can we just move forward please?
Emma on September 08, 2016 03:47 AM

This is #3 of 5 posts I had in draft state for a few months, that I decided finish up & post.  Here’s hoping my research helps others. I started writing this in May.

“Inessential weirdness of open source”

This term (crediting to Katrina Owen at Github) perfectly describes a conundrum of open participation, whereby we hold onto symbols, processes, and idiosyncrasies of open source in a mix of nostalgia, delusion and … I’m going to say it – arrogance ,  as the primary  (nearly holy) measures of  ‘being open’ in community building .

‘But’ve always done x’, is a very common response to change in open communities. Whereby we  unintentionally (yet deliberately) avoid change because we believe that that purity of ‘open’ is the only way to innovate further .  We  even avoid change despite huge potential to grow  more diverse and healthy open communities – because… there are slivers of non-open. gah!

Two years ago I ran the ‘Open Hatch Comes To Campus’ workshop at the University of Victoria. I spent 1.5 hours teaching people the skills they needed to ultimately… type ‘hello’ on an  IRC channel.. Our workshop implied  IRC was a critical doorway, and on-ramp to participation in open source.  Saying hello, asking for help – with an instructors guidance:  1.5 hours.  What?

I’ve often heard project maintainers say, that obtuse processes like these actually help ensure the success of  those who are truly serious about contribution.  As if asking basic questions  is a holy grail of volunteering- one where only those willing to waste ridiculous amounts of time on discombobulated, obtuse processes and tools  are worthy of participation.   I call bullshit on any process that makes connecting with others, in an ‘open project’ – an obstacle.

“open and accessible doesn’t beat usable and intelligent  

Christian Heilmann

In the last couple of years we’ve seen open communities faced with an interesting choice of using tools that work really well for working open, but are not  themselves open.  Github being the most obvious example. Similarly I’ve also followed the Open Data communities use of  + Slack + Slackin!

Still in the voice of nostalgia  asking us to remember our legacy  IRC.

Anyway….what exactly do we need our community software to do?  Here’s a short list I used when measuring chat solutions (and sure I am missing things)

  • Open source – I want the ability to inspect, and improve-on software we use for community conversation, and to propose improvement via pull requests.
  • Data is discover-able via web search.  So much  success of ‘open’ is that people can stumble on conversations that push innovation further.
  • Open Conversations – no login or registration required.  Anyone can ‘lurk’.
  • Easy to grasp & intuitive – Lets not ask newbies to install software to ask for help. Lets’ not expect that contributors are technical contributors.
  • Github feed (my own requirement, that everyone can see new issues, and comments they subscribe to).

A clever human-connection setup should allow new contributors an ability to answer these questions with some clarity:

  • Who is here?
  • Am I welcome here?
  • What’s happening in this community?
  • How can I contribute?
  • How do I ask for help?

With this criteria, and questions in mind, here are the results of  those I researched for education contributors at Mozilla:

Mattermost – Has potential, but seems unfinished, and little ‘alpha’.  Without installing myself ,I couldn’t figure out how to enable a Github feed.

Gitter I discovered this when looking around Free Code Club.   I liked the UI, and possibilities for multiple channels easily toggled, searchable and friendly.   Plugins tend to be more developer-friendly, which was a drawback for non-technical contribution – but not a show stopper.  Has a great search option for communities.   Chat rooms are associated with Github Repos, which has huge potential for building communities around projects and initiatives.

I think Gitter is doing with Github, what Github should be doing for Github projects interested in nurturing participation.

Discord – I found found Reactiflux development via Facebook React’s repo, but was nervous about jumping in.  Seems more like a team project, than community.   I found it intimidating, especially with voice, and it wasn’t clear what preferences where. Quickly left.

I revisited this after comments were left about this project portal being community organized (as it had been months since I was there).  Aside from struggling to switch login/register status, I do have to say it’s a very easy to lurk into – and has desktop versions (it seems I didn’t have a lot of time to test).  I’m not clear on how discover able conversations are outside of this app, but the community has set things up very well to ask questions in a number of ways (which is awesome).   Still on the fence about voice chat, but maybe that’s because it’s harder to stay gender-anonymous with voice.  Thanks for the comment that made me take another look Mark!

Rocketchat – It’s open source, it looks great – it has the potential to do what Gitter is doing for communities, but it feels very single-instance and Slack-replacement focused.   Don’t get me wrong, it’s beautiful, very capable of being a good alternative but I want more – I want ‘open’ feel like more than code.   If I had to choose an alternative it would be this one.

Rivr  – I couldn’t find inspiration other than free, and not-Slack.  Guessing it’s a great alternative too.

Slack should be thought of as first generation example of how community might meet, connect with participation and community, but not as a template, and not as a ‘bar’ that we now try to replicate openly.   Reactiflux community has also demonstrated that a cohesive collection of support vrs any one solution is often the best way to go as well.

It’s time we prioritized connection of humans ‘ in the open’- lets end the inessential weirdness of open source.

 

speech bubbles by jordesign CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

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Mozilla Switzerland – Community Meetup June 2016
Michael Kohler on September 06, 2016 07:05 PM

On June 20th the Swiss Mozillians met in Zurich to discuss the second half of the year. The goal was to come up with objectives for mozilla.ch that are aligned with the current Mozilla strategy and the Participation Team and Mozilla Reps goals.

At first we did a retrospective, here are the key results:

What should we stop doing?

  • Discussions on the mailing list
  • posting “meta” discussions on Github
  • focusing on initiatives we don’t have time for
  • excluding people from discussions (see “meta discussions”)
  • focusing on Zurich
  • creating single point of failures
  • missing to provide clear pathways to contribute when we have a talk

What should we start doing?

  • Create a central hub for all resources MozillaCH-related (in terms of “Get involved”)
  • Focus on a few single strengths we have instead of a lot of single initiatives we can only go so far for
  • Start non-linear discussions on discourse
  • Have more event locations to get to people that can’t come to Zurich or Lausanne
  • Be more clear about the strengths of single community members and support them with initiatives that fit into the general direction of Mozilla
  • Start using communication channels specific to the audience we want to reach

What should we continue doing?

  • Event organization works well
  • Github issues for tracking
  • Team work at meetups
  • Keeping things simple (not having a lot of bureaucracy hassle)

With that in mind, we came up with two objectives. Both are aligned with overall Mozilla strategy pieces. The first one is Core Strength, the second one is Prototyping the Future. None of these Key Results are easy to achieve, but we think that with these we can achieve a good base for the upcoming years.

Objective 1: Grow our core contributor strengths and be amazing at being visible in Switzerland

  • Key Result 1: We have at least 5 core contributors that are active on Discourse
  • Key Result 2: 30% of threads on Discourse are created by non Community Focus Group members
  • Key Result 3: At least 25 GitHub issues are created from a discussion on Discourse with clear steps on how to implement
  • Key Result 4: Have started an at least monthly meetup group around Developer Tools to have “hacking evenings”
  • Key Result 5: At least 3 persons are involved in organizing events
  • Key Result 6: At least 4 persons are involved in creating content for Twitter tweets and answering mentions
  • Key Result 7: The mozilla.ch website clearly reflects on where we want people to get involved in MozillaCH covering all functional areas provided on the Wiki page
  • Key Result 8: At least 80% of functional areas are covered by at least 2 contact persons

Objective 2: We are a driver in prototyping Firefox for the future

  • Key Result 1: We have started a monthly meetup group around Developer Tools to have hacking evenings, providing guidance to new people to get involved in hacking DevTools
  • Key Result 2: We have at least 2 hackathons for 2 different components
  • Key Result 3: We have at least 20 confirmed Nightly users who know how to submit bugs
  • Key Result 4: We are engaging at least 10 people in QA’ing Servo for specific websites
  • Key Result 5: We engage at least 2 persons to work on positron, spidernode or browser.html

What do you find intriguing? What would you like to know more about? Jump into a discussion on Discourse or participate in our GitHub Participation issue repository.


Power To Mobilizers
deimidis on September 06, 2016 06:09 PM
TL;DR

Mobilizers at Mozilla, a framework for Leadership on Social Age and the programs that Participation Team are leading to bring those skills to Mozillians all over the globe

“Each person shines with his or her own light. No two flames are alike. There are big flames and little flames, flames of every color. Some people’s flames are so still they don’t even flicker in the wind, while others have wild flames that fill the air with sparks. Some foolish flames neither burn nor shed light, but others blaze with life so fiercely that you can’t look at them without blinking, and if you approach you shine in the fire.”
― Eduardo Galeano

Every one of us knows people of this kind. Many of them are in our community. When they tell you a story, you live that story at their side. Their passion is so big that it makes you realize how many things we could do together. Those people shine better with others, working and having fun with them.

Nobody is born like that. We develop those skills in our family, school or neighborhood. And everyone can learn to be that way with the right tools and the right people by our side. That’s what we want to create at Mozilla, a space where everyone can learn and improve their inter-personal skills to advance Mozilla’s mission together with other Mozillians.

Leadership In Our Times

Our era is a different era for leaders. The type of leadership needed and respected today is not the same that was important and followed 10 years ago. Julian Stodd created a framework about Social Leadership, the type of leadership needed today. He describes a leader’s capacities in 3 dimensions:

  1. Narrative which is about curating your space and telling the right story with great effect
  2. Engagement which is about being an effective part of communities.
  3. Technology which is about collaboration and co-creation.

Emma Irwin, from the Participation Team, has been leading an effort to «localize» this model for Mozilla. With the immense work of Verena Roberts, Mikko Kontto and Greg Mcverry, they translated those dimensions to Communication, Network and Sustainability.

They are in the process to create a Leadership framework, a compilation of resources that will help any Mozillian to learn and improve their Social leadership skills.

Because of different cultural meanings for the word leader, we prefer to talk about mobilizers, people that will help and inspire others to participate. Mobilizers are a key part in our efforts to make Participation at Mozilla better.

Content In Practice

Resources are only half of the work. The Participation Team is working on different ways to bring those skills to Mozillians. With a series of Community Gatherings organized in different parts of the world, we are creating spaces to have sessions and workshops with groups of people interested in mobilizing.

In 2016 we have already organized two Community Gatherings and we are preparing for three more focused on our European, Arabic, and Mexican communities. Each of them serves as an iteration point for our sessions and workshops. Additionally we are creating toolkits to organize this type of events, so every community will be able to organize their local gathering in the future following the same standards.

At the same time, through the RepsNext process we have started a training which will help Mozillians develop coaching skills. We believe this will be useful for community development and to find new ways to participate in the Mozilla Project. I will write another blog post about this program soon, with a reflection of our first cohort of Reps Coaches.

Please add comments and feedback on Discourse


Rep of the Month – August 2016
mkohler on September 06, 2016 01:28 PM

Please join us in congratulating Prathamesh Chavan, Rep of the Month for August 2016!

Prathamesh is an extremely active and super energetic Mozillian of the Indian community. He has successfully led several different events and shown unbelievable leadership skills. One of the most recent examples of his untiring energy was the Mozilla India Community meetup 2016. His skills at managing all the logistical work for such a huge event was a pleasant surprise for all the organizers and senior members of the community.

Prathamesh is famous of going around with a viral smile. If ever asked to do some work, he does it with a smile and also makes sure that the smile virus is perfectly passed on to you…leaving you smiling as well. Prathamesh is a strong supporter of the Open Web and believes that everyone deserves to have access to it. With this thought in mind, Prathamesh also initiated the MILE project here in the Indian community. The purpose of the MILE project is to teach the basics of web to the less fortunate section of our society.

Please join us in congratulating him on Discourse!


RepsNext: introducing the Review Team
kpapadea on September 05, 2016 06:26 PM

TL;DR As part of the RepsNext a group of experienced Reps has been assembled to improve Reps resource request cycle times. This will enable all Reps to have more impact. This group, called the Review Team, will review bugs  as of  Monday the 5th of September.

 

The background of the decision

 

It all started  when we were working on the the future of the Reps program (also known as RepsNext). We realized that resources are a crucial part of the Program. In the past our budget process had been going extremely fast and easy. Unfortunately, it has slowed down due to multiple factors: 1) the program had grown but processes were not scaled appropriately, 2) Reps were not providing enough information on their initiatives, 3) mentors and council were not reviewing budgets on time, and  4) people were focused mainly on decreasing cost instead of maximizing impact.

Those factors created a lot of frustration across the program and disengagement among Reps. We also identified that we wanted to move away from just an events program to a program that would enable Reps to have all the resources needed (hardware, budget, helping documents, guidance on where to focus their energy) in order to have greater impact in their community. We want Reps to be able to do more and not constrain them. For that reason we’ve created the Resources Working Group.

 

Decisions made in the Reps Working Group

 

After the Working Groups were formed, we’ve started having meetings on early February, 2016. The conversations were long and impactful and involved both Reps and Council members.

The following decisions were made:

  • There will be a specialised track for Reps called the Reps Resources. Reps that will join that track will be handling resources, aligned with our priorities and helping their fellow Reps with them
  • Since the Resources Reps will be highly trained there won’t be need for mentor review in our budget workflow
  • A Review Team will be formed which will be responsible to review resource requests in order to take the burden from the council.

 

If you want to see how was the whole progress of the group, you could find more about it here

 

Reps Council and Peers Meeting Decisions

 

On the Reps Council and Peers Meeting held in April 2016 in Berlin we decided that we will implement our decisions step by step. First, we introduce the Review Team replacing the council for bug review. Then, we gradually start the training for our Resources Reps.

 

Reps and Peers meeting in Berlin, 2016. Photo credits to C. Bacharakis

Review Team formation

 

In the London All Hands (June 2016) the council has agreed on onboarding 5 experienced Reps along with 1 employee and 1 council member on taking the responsibility to be part of the first Review team. You can find more about their selection criteria and responsibilities on this github issue.

The Review Team will be assembled from the following people:

  • Ankit Gadgil
  • Dian Ina Mahendra
  • Faisal Aziz
  • Flore Allemandou
  • Irayani Queencyputri
  • Konstantina Papadea
  • Priyanka Nag

 

The Review Team

 

The Review Team won’t take full responsibilities at once. Instead, there will be a 4 weeks transition period, where the Review Team will be coached by the council in order to better understand the needs of the program and effectively review the budget bugs.

For the first 2 weeks, the Review Team will follow all the upcoming budget requests by giving feedback as an advisor reviewer. For the next  2 weeks, the roles will be reversed: the Review Team will be the primary reviewers with the Council taking a supportive role.  This transition period will start this Monday September the 5th.

 

What’s Next

 

Of course, we need to understand if our assumption of forming the Review Team will help us reduce cycle times in the program. For that reason, we will track approval time for budgets via bugzilla and how satisfied are our Reps with the new decision (via sending out feedback surveys to all our Reps).

Moreover, we will continue investing in the Reps Resources by working on the training for the Reps that want to join the track.

 

I am really happy for all the changes that have been made and more excited for what’s to come.

Special thanks to all the people who volunteered on contributing to this crucial domain

 

Onwards Reps


Joining Mozilla as Participation Strategist
Henrik Mitsch on September 04, 2016 10:54 PM

Today I am joining Mozilla as Participation Strategist. Following almost 15 years as a volunteer Mozillian I become a staff contributor.

This is an immense honor and I can only pledge to serve Mozilla’s mission, ensuring the Internet is a global public resource, open and accessible to all. An Internet that truly puts people first, where individuals can shape their own experience and are empowered, safe and independent.

Over the coming months I look forward to working with the Participation Systems team on Mozilla’s Identity and Access Management agenda as well as deepening our research on Volunteer Management Systems.

Onwards, lot’s of learning ahead!



Pinoy Mozillians at the Mozilla Asian L10n Hackathon 2016
Bob on August 29, 2016 09:34 AM

A delegation from the Philippines (known internally within the global L10n Community as the Tagalog Team), composed of four (04) Mozilla Reps, were invited to participate in the Mozilla Asian Localization (L10n) Hackathon 2016 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia over the weekend. The Philippine delegation is composed of Kim Domanog, Kevin Ventura, Frederick Villaluna and myself. Each […]

The post Pinoy Mozillians at the Mozilla Asian L10n Hackathon 2016 appeared first on Bob Reyes Dot Com.


Reps Program Objectives – Q3 2016
mkohler on August 27, 2016 09:04 AM

With “RepsNext” we increased alignment between the Reps program and the Participation team. The main outcome is setting quarterly Objectives and Key Results together. This enables all Reps to see which contributions have a direct link to the Participation team . Of course, Reps are welcome to keep doing amazing work in other areas.

Objective 1 Reps are fired up about the Activate campaign and lead their local community to success through supporting that campaign with the help of the Review Team
KR1 80+ core mozillians coached by new mentors contribute to at least one focus activity.
KR2 75+ Reps get involved in the Activity Campaign, participating in at least one activity and/or mobilizing others.
KR3 The Review Team is working effectively by decreasing the budget review time by 30%

 

Objective 2 New Reps coaches and regional coaches bring leadership within the Reps program to a new level and increase the trust of local communities towards the Reps program
KR1 40 mentors and new mentors took coaching training and start at least 2 coaching relationships.
KR2 40% of the communities we act on report better shape/effectiveness thanks to the regional coaches
KR3 At least 25% of the communities Regional Coaches work with report feeling represented by the Reps program

Which of the above objectives are you most interested in? What key result would you like to hear more about? What do you find intriguing? Which thoughts cross your mind upon reading this?

Let’s keep the conversation going! Please provide your comments in Discourse.


Recent publications - July & Avgust 2016
on August 21, 2016 09:31 AM
In recent months I have published two posts which were well recieved by public. First one is my...

RepsNext – Improvements overview
mkohler on August 11, 2016 10:41 PM

Over the past months we have extensively worked on the future of the Reps program – called RepsNext. In several working groups we worked on proposals to improve the Reps program, keeping up with the Mozilla’s and our Reps’ needs. Following the RepsNext Introduction Video this blog post provides a broad overview of the various focus areas and invites further conversation.

RepsNext – The Visual Structure

Here is a visual overview of the RepsNext structure:

With RepsNext there will be three different tracks to be specialized in:

  • Functional Goals
  • Leadership
  • Resources

The Functional Goals track is still work-in-progress, so we cannot provide a lot of information yet. We believe this will be a group of Reps who are heavily engaged in Mozilla’s functional areas.

Reps from the Leadership track support other Mozillians and communities through their broad  knowledge. Reps in this track will regularly exchange information among themselves, creating alignment among the various functional goals in the Reps program.

For all resource requests there is a dedicated Resources track which is specialized on increasing the program’s impact. The Review team, which is part of this track, is responsible to review budget requests.

Finally, every Rep will have a coach who has strong leadership skills and can provide guidance on Reps’ personal development.

Through this structure Reps from all specialization tracks can work together towards the overall Reps and Participation goals, each Rep contributing with their particular strengths to advance  Mozilla’s mission.

What are we going to improve in the Reps program?

Let’s compare the current state of the Reps program with the proposed improvements.

Area Current Future
Alignment with Mozilla There are no formal alignment processes with the Mozilla organization The Reps Program is aligned with the Participation team’s OKRs. Council members  participate in important planning and strategy meetings
Budget Request Reviews All Reps can submit budget requests, leading to a lot of ping pong when reviewing those Reps can specialize on “Resources” and file requests aligned for impact. This leads to faster reviews
Reps Activities Reps are mostly focused on running events in their communities Reps will be able to specialize in a certain topic (Resources, Leadership, Functional areas)
Mentoring Mentors are busy with Budget Request reviews Mentors will be focusing on personal development, no need to do budget reviews anymore (but you can be part of the Resources track)
Leadership Leadership has been part of Reps since its very beginning, it was not formally nurtured very well With the Leadership track we enable Reps’ personal development and develop their leadership potential for them to expand impact on their fellow Mozillians
Moving forward

We plan to go into more detail for each of the above mentioned areas in future blog posts. In order to prioritize and invest our (volunteering) energy in the most impactful way, we need your help: Which of the above areas are you most interested in? Where do you want to hear more in the next blog post? Which concerns do you have? What do you find intriguing?

Please let us know in Discourse and we aim to come up with an article answering to all your questions in a timely manner.


3 different types of participation - TW Mozillians in HKOSCon from 2014-2016
Irvin Chen (noreply@blogger.com) on August 08, 2016 05:41 PM

Last month in 6/24-26, several MozTW community members flied to Hong Kong visited HKOSCon, Hong Kong Open Source Conference. This is our 3rd time joining the event, and we had tried 3 different forms of participation, here I would like to share a bit about it.

HKOSCon

Hong Kong Open Source Conference is annual open source conference in Hong Kong, co-hosted by 3 communities, HKCOTA, HKLUG and Open Source Hong Kong.

One of the event's characteristic is that HKOSCon is formed by volunteers and students, not by for-profit company (which is pretty similar to COSCUP, another open source conference in Taiwan).

Actually, according to one of the funder (and Mozilla Rep) Sammy Fung said, we can think it as a smaller (around 500 ppls) and more internationalized (English-based) version of COSCUP, which have around 2k participants and use Chinese as main language.

According to my observation, participants in HKOSCon is a combination of local (Hong Kong) enginners and students, speakers and students from Taiwan, and foreign speakers.

2014 - Chinese Mozillians Unite Booth and Forum Session

2014 (March 29) is our first time to participating in HKOSCon. We tried to gather 8 Reps from Hong Kong (2), Taiwan (3) and China (3) together in the conference. We host a typical Mozilla community booth, a forum (“Mozilla communities in Chinese-speaking regions”) and a private meetup to discuss various topics about building Mozilla communities in the region.

Hong Kong is a special place that is 1) accessable by people from both Taiwan and China, without many political problems and limitations, 2) use both Chinese / English as primary language, and 3) close to all major east-Asian cities, so it's pretty pratical to be choosen as the place that we all gathered. I also experience that Wikimania 2013 (took place in Hong Kong Polytechnic University) also take the advantage to gathered many China / Taiwan contributors. Singapore has similar advantages but it just 4 times far away for us.

What worked and what didn't?

The idea of unite the Mozillians from different places really works, and I believed that we need to do it more (re-engage MozCamp perhaps?) But next time if we want to take HKOSCon as a chance, we may need to plan a whole dedicated day for Mozillian meetup, to work longer besides participating inside confernece, to get into more detailed discussion. (which may look similar to Leadership Summit and MozCamp beta in India?)

Here is my debrief about our participation in HKOSCon 2014,

2015 - Involved more Taiwanese Mozillians Booth and Workshop

In 2015 (June 26-27), we take a different approach that bring more Taiwanese Mozillian to get involved to HKOSCon. Total 7 Mozillians (5 Reps) joined. This year we also focus our most effort on the booth, and I personally host a Webmaker workshop.

The theme of the booth is FoxYeah campaign, we asked people to take selfie photos with 5 FoxYeah banners and received stickers. Most participants already know Firefox and was our user, so we would like to recall their attention back to the core value of Firefox.

For the Webmaker workshop, due to the design of the room and session length, it's not really work out well. Also I feel that Webmaker is not really suitable for this developer-focus conference participants that it just too simple.

What worked and what didn't?

Designing a more interactive booth event worked really good, we had interacting with many graceful people at the booth, and got more then 40 “FoxYeah photos”.

Webmaker workshop which focus on education and entering level of contributors not work. The main participants of HKOSCon are more engineer based (far more then COSCUP) and we need our workshop to be more technical for them.

Here is my debrief about our participation in HKOSCon 2015, you can also find the link of articles from other participants inside.

2016 - Just focus on session

This year, due to overwhelmed workload after London Allhands, I didn't pay as much planning effot as previous 2 years that can involved many participants together. Instead, I try just to focus on session, and keep it simple that only 3 TW Mozillians joined and gave 2 sessions, debrief my journey of contributing in Mozilla and yajs.vim, JavaScript syntax highlight for VIM by Othree, another speaker from TW community*.

Besides sessions from the community volunteer, there are another 2 from Mozilla paid-staff - Mozilla Eir, connecting device topic by Kevin Hu and Fuzzing testing by Gary Kwong.

What worked and what didn't?

Because that we didn't set a booth, it's hard to evaluate how many attendees is interesting in participating Mozilla this time (compare to the previous 2 years that we had contributing forms at our booth).

But the Fuzzing and Othree's HTML5-related sessions, as well as my session did attach many people and I can feel overall better response then last year's workshop. Another reason of the better atmosphere at sessions may due to several OSS participating-related sessions had been organized next each other in schedule, and thus attached the right audiences.

And suggestion for the future...

From our previous experiences, here I come up with some suggestions for next year,

  1. Bring in more foreign technical speakers

    There are more developers in HKOSCon that is interesting in technical topics, engineering speaker can have better interaction in HKOSCon, things like “how we use Rust” or “How do we do Firefox release engineering” should do well there.

  2. Booth is necessery

    With only session, it's hard for us to interaction with all partcipants, booth does that well. Besides giving out stickers and demonstrating hardware / flyers, plan a simple event such as FoxYeah photo campaign in 2015 will please everyone.

  3. 7~10 Mozillians is good numbers for participation

    We had around 10 Mozillians (excludes local HK Mozillians which are all dedicated to run HKOSCon) in both 2014 and 2015 HKOSCon, 5~7 of them are volunteers. It's enough to both manage a booth and give 3 to 5 sessions with this numbers, and the rate of Mozillians to all participants would be around 2%.


The different kinds of (Mozilla) community spaces and it’s pathway
Irvin Chen (noreply@blogger.com) on August 08, 2016 05:40 PM

This is part of the result we found from the “How might we (re)invent existing and future MozSpace to run innivation experiments”, which we address different kinds of community space at the community space session on Mozilla AllHands 2016 in London.

(see original draft poster from our discussion) The characteristic

There are different types of spaces with various characteristic, eg.

  • # of core contributors
  • scale of community
  • # of non-Mozilla communities involved
  • meeting / event frequency
  • density of the region / distence of the contributors (transit difficulties)
  • resource invest from Mozilla and community
Different type of spaces

Following is the space various in different type that we found in our expereinces and in different region, it may be a of community space (and probably also same for the community meeting).

Temporary (in time & venue) spaces

  • Online space (forum / IM / IRC channels)
  • Kitchen (or school) table
  • Meet in coffee house
  • Hackathon & sprint in private apartment / meeting venue
  • Partnership with co-working space (eg., The Hub)
  • Cooperating / supporting existing hackerspace / makerspace

Physically communtiy space

  • Mozilla Community Spaces, eg., Taipei, Manila & Jakarta
  • Space inside Mozilla office
Online space (forum / IM / IRC channels)

It was begin when some people who is interesting in promoting Mozilla and it’s various products gathering and meet online.

  • # of core contributors - 2~20
  • scale of community - 5~150
  • there will be much harder more then this numbers
  • # of non-Mozilla communities involved - 0
  • meeting / event frequency - variously
  • distence of the contributors - withing country / same languages area
  • resource invest from Mozilla and community - minimin
Kitchen (or school) Table

Some people may want to meet face-by-face hacking / discussing frequenly

  • # of core contributors - 2~3
  • scale of community - 2~5
  • # of non-Mozilla communities involved - 0
  • meeting / event frequency - various from weekly to monthly
  • distence of the contributors - closly, within city
  • resource invest from Mozilla and community - minimum
Meet in coffee house

If there are more contributors within in the city, they may able to meet weekly / bi-weekly / monthly and maybe more leisure with loose agenda ccording to the meeting frequency

  • # of core contributors - 5~10
  • scale of community - 5~30
  • # of non-Mozilla communities involved - some randemly
  • meeting / event frequency - weekly to monthly
  • density of the region / distence of the contributors - within city
  • resource invest from Mozilla and community - small, mainly a cup of coffee
Private apartment / meeting venue

When more contributors focus on some contirbuting regions, they will run some hackathon / design sprint periodically

  • # of core contributors - 5~15
  • scale of community - 10~100
  • # of non-Mozilla communities involved - 0
  • meeting / event frequency - quatyly / 6 months / yearly
  • density of the region / distence of the contributors - within country
  • resource invest from Mozilla and community - medium each time
Partnership with co-working space (eg., The Hub)

If there are some contributors or remoties work more frequenly and host more events, they may want to find a permanently / half-permanently space. We find that sometimes there are good cooperating and supporting from local co-working space.

  • # of core contributors - 3~10
  • scale of community - 20~
  • # of non-Mozilla communities involved - some
  • meeting / event frequency - daily, bi-daily, weekly
  • density of the region / distence of the contributors - within city
  • resource invest from Mozilla and community - small/medium monthly
Cooperating with existing hackerspace / makerspace

Similar to the above co-working space, there may be some hackerspace / makerspace already exist and in good align with Mozilla’s mission, the community may like to join or get involved the venue.

We should have some application procedure at this stage, for communities who is interesting in get into next stage of pathway.

  • # of core contributors - 3~10
  • scale of community - 20~
  • # of non-Mozilla communities involved - more then 2
  • meeting / event frequency - daily, bi-daily, weekly
  • density of the region / distence of the contributors - within city
  • resource invest from Mozilla and community - small/medium monthly
Physical Community Space

After all this stage, the community now has more people and frequenly events and many meetups, they may want to get their own community spaces in order to better hosting and contributing.

The most important thing in this stage is that besides benefit Mozilla community, we want to also help / support other communities within the region, in order to better using the resource, and they most probably also under their early stage of this pathway.

# of core contributors - 10~20 scale of community - 50~ # of non-Mozilla communities involved - 10 and more meeting / event frequency - daily, bi-daily density of the region / distence of the contributors - within city resource invest from Mozilla and community - large monthly

Space inside Mozilla office

If we have more and more remoties working at Mozilla during the growth of the Mozilla community, eventually we will set up a Mozilla office inside the area. It will be similar to the community spaces and have good community-staff relationship if we follow and grow alone the path.

  • # of core contributors - 20~35
  • scale of community - 100~
  • # of non-Mozilla communities involved - 10 and more
  • meeting / event frequency - daily, bi-daily
  • density of the region / distence of the contributors - within city / country
  • resource invest from Mozilla and community - large monthly
The pathway (aka. A River of Spaces)

Above different kinds of space is a typical pathway we found in different communities and in our community's 10+ years experience. We had pass all of those stage (besides the office one), and some other communities may currently in one of the earlier stage.


A River of Spaces

It’s like the flow of the river from upper reach to the ocean, we can imaging the flow as the size of the community / the resource / the reach and the impact. Different communities are not necessery follow the same pathway but it should be somehow similer.

Thanks all of the Mozilla Community Space stewards in the session, especially Henrik, Gaspar, Nikos, Yofie who is in this discussion.


Mozilla, we had a little transparency problem
Irvin Chen (noreply@blogger.com) on August 08, 2016 05:40 PM
We put too less attention to  "Community driven development" and "Transparent" part of our core culture recent years.

Why is Focus stay so secret before Mozlando, even we NDA covered Mozillians know nothing about it before it on stage? How can "we" say something like "we will take Firefox OS ..." or "we will go..."  without we even knowing it before the news and before someone on stage make the notice? Why is there more and more secret and non-public future feature of Firefox that we cannot find plan anywhere (eg., that "stream" things), And why could we took down all l10n-ed part of Webmaker (and even change it's name to Mozilla Learning without we had any discussion, and so far we still don't know anything about it's future's l10n strategy?)
we, we, we, we, we. How can Mozilla talk about “we” when “we” don’t even know what’s going on? - Elio 
I'm pretty agree the echo from BobChao's comment to Elio's blog post. We had a serious problem here and we need a little more TRANSPARENT PROCEDURE to fix it, just as our manifesto indicated. "Transparent community-based processes promote participation, accountability and trust." And we does need some more participation now!

In Open Source – Walk a Mile, See a Mile
Emma on August 02, 2016 01:54 AM

This is #2 of 5 ‘Draft’ posts I identified as worth wrapping-up vrs. ‘forever a draft’ status.

I wrote this post in April-ish, based on notes I took attempting to reach my goal to contribute to 10 open source projects by July.  Some unexpected challenges in my life made this goal impossible, but I still learned a lot… maybe next year.


In January, I set a personal goal of contributing to 10 open source projects by July. A research project of sort, I wanted uncover tools, processes, community engagement, and unknown magic existing beyond my own knowledge and experience. By exploring and researching the modern day experience of contributing to open source, I imagined I could get much better at designing for, and teaching it…

I pledged to myself that I would be select a projects where I could answer the following questions

“I can understand the value of the project on things I care about”.

“I can see how my time might help impact the outcome of that project’s goals, however small”.

Walk a Mile, See a Mile.

I also promised myself, that I would release all arrogance, bias and (most) opinions of how a project might be setup.  I adopted “Walk a Mile, See a Mile” to remind myself that the journey towards designing better for people, means being open for what comes next – I would grow with the experience.

In this, my first three months of contributing I’ve already had plenty of adventure.

Searching & Finding

My search started leveraging Github ‘Trending Repositories‘ – something I’ve heard recommended for new contributors. The search is limited  to filter for  language, which already limits this function to  technical contribution – which is too bad.

Suggestion to Github – allow projects to tag their repositories with types of contribution available.

I also wanted to find  SQL/PLSQL contribution opportunities, but the top trending project had a commit from two years ago.  Maybe that’s just my old timey- skill-set speaking ;)

Suggest to Github – define ‘Trending’, or limit results.  Wasting time on a dead or old project isn’t a good experience.

Finally, to fulfill my goal of ‘understanding the value’ of a project I am limited to project descriptions, which was hard.

Suggest to Github – provide optional description that states value of project for contributors, or FOSS projects agree on a  CONTRIBUTE.MD standard field any query on the web can pull from (omitting Github as a search).  We really need better standards for participation. Blarg. 

I went through a lot of repos, opting to select only one from Trending, and the rest from referrals or personal interest, which shows you how much we still suck in OS at surfacing projects people can find in their own.  I’ve landed on these 5 to start:

  • React Native
    • Curious about Facebook community engagement.   Assume there are good first tasks I can handle.
  • Rust
    • Rust is an inspiring project, with a strong community.  Want to learn more.
  • Free Code Camp
    • Teaches coding, for free, with an angle on helping non-profits.  Almost like participation wrapped in a project to help multiple projects?  Sounds like my thing.
  • exercism.io
    • Teaches  many languages, including Rust, think I possibly I could amplify my Rust knowledge while contributing to framework that teaches it.
  • Jekyll
    • Know Jekyll quite well, assumed could be a quicker one, and a contribution to a project I’ve used a lot actually.
Learning so Far

Including a link from your repo, to your project webpage, or demo is important. 

I  hated wandering through code, and issues looking to see what a project looks like, or does.  I wanted to get in there and play.

9 out of 10 times I will opt to join a chat channel over forums.  I’m in a rush like everyone else, so if I can :

a) see conversation

b) ask a quick question, I’m more likely to stick around for a bit.

Free Code Camp does this well, having both on the main page.  I’ll have another post on the different chat software I saw, and liked.

Forums felt like a ‘community resource’ (which has a place)  when I visited them vrs a way to engage with people.

Welcome bots, that say hello to new users are awesome, but one of the reasons I also use an alias when lurking.  Chat should allow for lurking.

Project-specific newsletters are awesome.  I didn’t realize how helpful it would be to have a project news letter (for times when I am too busy to contribute).  Rust does this well!

Environment builds are still the worst part of ‘sticking’ to a project. 

I am familiar with many technology stacks, and debugging but I have so far found  myself stuck on obscure issues that even the most helpful people can’t get me over in a short period of time.  Thinking of limiting build-problems to max of 6 hours before abandoning project.   Main reason I seem to get stuck – outdated docs, missing dependencies, or worst (in one situation) building the WRONG environment because Google search brought me to an outdated wiki that had not been noted as so…

I like the idea of Virtual Machines, but I’ve found outdated ones of those as well.  Perhaps Facebook and React will provide a new way to help overcome environment first-builds.

Too many ‘Garbage Tasks’

I’ve called these out before.  A good first task should not look like this.  Remove this label when it’s not longer true.  Good first tasks are basic like – changing an error message, or debugging CSS alignment.

Screenshots rock.

‘Help-wanted’ tags aren’t enough to invite new contributors – I needed to see ‘beginner, quick task, or something similar’.  Maybe I have less patience than others.

Non-Technical Contribution Is Hard to Find

Really, really difficult to imagine the ways you can help if the project is not specifically about that skill.  There’s an entirely different highway for non-technical contributors, and that sucks especially if you are interested in both.

I realize if I wanted to contribute in other ways, that would be different research altogether.

Good Documentation & Support

Free Code Camp has a great contribution page – and I LOVED their Gitter had help commands that allowed people to learn more about contributing, and that they have a specific chat just for contribution which is less intimidating than joining a project team chat head-down in a crisis.  I know IRC does this, as well, but IRC is a blocker for many.

Jekyll is also really clear.

I LOVED finding this post ‘Diving into Rust’ from community-member Flaki.  Describing ‘use cases’ really compelled me to get more involved in a project that had felt a bit abstract to me still.  Found via Google-search.   I found this page on Rust documentation a bit too much for getting, although I expect it’s a great resource to come back to.

Again, chat channels not forums were my go-to for project questions.

Code of Conduct Matters

Seeing a code of conduct, like the ones in exercism.io and rust made me feel welcome, not just because it’s there, but because the community decided it should be.   I’m  glad Jekyll had a COC, but without a clear path for resolution, other than project maintainer – it felt only half-way there.   There are people much better than me to review CoC but I’ll say personally, I prefer to know who is behind an alias as well.

And that’s what I’ve learned, and experienced so far.  Next post will dive deeper into evaluation of chat channels.

Open Has Walls

An update on one other project, I am very interested in (eventually) lending my skills to beyond this experiment is with #OpenCancer.  Creative Commons has joined forces with Moonshot to end cancer in our lifetime.  The simple question of ‘how can I help scientists, and others using my technology/open/participation/data skills hasn’t yet been answered.   Is open science limited to teaching researchers, or is there a bigger movement to get the rest of us involved?  I hope so in this case.  Another research project perhaps.

I realize .. we’re only really  at the beginning of making participation in open projects feel as accessible for everyone.  Its hard climbing the walls of open some days, but we’ll get there.

 

Image Credit: Rak Tia, Rupert Ganzer

 

 

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Weeks of Contribution 2016 – Localization – Report.
Khaleel Jageer on August 01, 2016 01:58 PM

The limits of my language are the limits of my world.
‒Ludwig Wittgenstein

So last year myself along with other contributors started Weeks of Contribution Program for contributors around MozillaTN . This blog post about the first training session of 2016 Weeks Of Contribution.

As per the plan WOC’16 started with Tamil Mozilla Localization and Translation. Yah!!!   both First and Second sessions went fine, by I had lot of learning in teaching new contributors and encouraging them to contribute.

Contributors who attended the Hangout sessions:

  1. Viswaprasath
  2. Paarttipaabhalaji
  3. Bhuvana Meenakshi.K
  4. Survesh
  5. Madhukanth
  6. Ashly Rose
  7. Selva Makilan
  8. Fahid M
  9. Gokul Karthik K
  10. Dineshkumar
  11. Mano.J
  12. Kartic Keyan

Discussed topics :

  • Localization & Translation
  • Needs of L10N
  • Mozilla l10n projects
  • Hangout demo on Pontoon and Pootle

 

Hangouts session takes almost 2+ hours to finish. The time denotes the strength of the discussion. Almost all the participants raised their questions during the session.

Main agenda of this WOC’16 is, the people who attended the hangout session should contribute first then they have to train some people in their locality. So every person took responsibility to teach minimum 5 people.

Suggestion made by contributors in both Pootle and Pontoon:

  1. Bhuvana Menakshi Team : 210
  2. Ashly Rose Mathew.M Team : 650
  3. Mano Team : 180
  4. Madhukanth Team : 406
  5. Fahid M Team : 174
  6. R.Makilan Team : 800+
  7. Dinesh kumar Team : 150+
  8. Paarttipaabhalaji Team : ~500
  9. Prasanth P Team : 218
  10. Survesh Team : 435
  11. Sabari Vasagan Team : 180
  12. Gokul Karthik Team : 356
  13. Roopak Suresh Team : 500
  14. Vishwanth Adhepalli Team : 230

Yahoooooooooooooooooo its around 4989…. almost we reached our target…. yah we targeted to suggest 5000 strings in two weeks….. We made it…

Its my pleasure to thanks Vishwaprasath who mentored this team. Thanks ge!!! And my sincere thanks to all my TA_FoxTeam who made this great achievement.

I’m expecting you guys will continue your contribution in future.

#மகிழ்ச்சி #mazhilchi



Rep of the Month – July 2016
mkohler on July 27, 2016 04:53 PM

Please join us in congratulating Christophe Villeneuve as Reps of the Month for July 2016!

Christophe Villeneuve has been a Rep for more than 9 months now and has reported more than 100 activities in the program. From talks on security to writing articles and organizing events, Christophe is active in many different areas. Did we already mention that he also bakes Firefox cookies?

His energy and drive to promote the Open Web and web security is astonishing. Even if sometimes external factors intervene and some of the activities get blockers he  neither  gets disappointed nor quits, he looks for the next possibility out there. He truly is an open source believer contributing to other open source communities (like Drupal, PHP, MariaDB) as well and he tries to combine those activities for bigger audiences.

Please don’t forget to congratulate him on Discourse!


Passports for Community Leadership
Emma on July 26, 2016 08:57 PM

This is #1 of 5 posts I identified as perhaps, being worth finishing and sharing.   Writing never feels finished, and it’s a vulnerable thing… to share ideas – but perhaps better than never sharing them at all?

I wrote most of this post in April of this year (making this outdated with the current work of the Participation Team), thinking about ways the learning format of the Leadership Summit in Singapore could evolve into a valuable tool for community leadership development and credentialing.  Community Leadership Passport(s) perhaps…


At the Participation Leadership Summit in Singapore, we designed the schedule in time blocks sorted by the Leadership Framework.  This meant that everyone attended at least one session identified under each of the building blocks.  The schedule was structured something like this…

As you can see, the structure  ensured that everyone experienced learning outcomes of the entire framework, while still providing choice in what felt most relevant, exciting or interesting in their personal development.  You can find some of this content here.

I started wondering..

How might we evolve the schedule design and content into a format for leadership development that also provides real world credentials?

I don’t think the answer is to take this schedule and make it a static ‘course’ or offering, I don’t think it is about ‘event in box’,  but I do think there’s something in using the framework to enforce quality leadership development, while giving power to what people want to learn, and how they prefer to learn.

Merging this idea + my previous work with participation ‘steps & ladders’ into something like a passport, or series of passports for leadership.

Really, this is about creating a mechanism for helping people build leadership credentials in a way that intersects what they want to learn and do, and what the project needs. It could be used for anything from developing strong mentors, to project leads in areas like IoT and Rust, to governance and diversity & inclusion. Imagining Passports with  3 attributes:

Experience – Taking action, completing tasks, generating experiences associated with learning and project outcomes. Should be clear, and feel doable without too much detail.

Mozilla Content – Completing a course either developed by, or approved as Mozilla content.   These could be online, or in person events.

Learner Choice – Encouraging exploration, and learning that feels valuable, interesting and fun – but with some guidelines for topics, outcomes and likely recommendations to make things easier.  For example, some people might want to complete a Coursera Course on IOT and Embedded systems, while others might prefer a ‘learning by doing’ approach via YouTube channels.

Something like a Leadership Passport would obviously require more thought in implementation, tracking and issuing certification. It could also be used to test and evolve Leadership Framework. I prefer it over a participation ladder because it feels less prescriptive in ‘how’ we step up as leaders and more supportive of ways want to learn and lead — and ultimately help us recognize and invest in emerging leaders sooner.

Image Credit:  Kate Harding – Quilt of Nations.

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Rep of the Month – June 2016
mkohler on July 21, 2016 03:54 PM

Please join us in congratulating Alex Lakatos as Reps of the Month for June 2016!

Alex is a Mozilla Rep based in London, Great Britain, originally from Romania. He is also a Mozilla TechSpeaker, giving talks all around Europe.

In the last 2 months Alex held several technical talks all over Europe (CodeCamp Cluj, OSCAL in Albania, DevTalks in Bucharest and DevSum in Sweden just to name a few) to promote Mozilla’s mission and the Open Web. With his enthusiasm in tech he is a crucial force to promote our mission and educate developers all around Europe about new Web technologies. He covered both the transition we are doing shifting from Firefox OS to a more innovative area with Connected Devices but also changes in Firefox and why you should consider the improvements made on the DevTools side.

Please don’t forget to congratulate him on Discourse!


True leader is someone who creates new leaders.
on July 18, 2016 04:06 PM
Past week I’ve been involved in regional localization hackathon which was held in Ljubljana,...

Joining the Mozilla Tech Speakers Phase 2 – Summer 2016
Bob on July 16, 2016 12:26 PM

As part of organization’s aim to increase developer awareness and adoption of the Web, Firefox, and Mozilla through a strong community-driven technical speaker development program, the Mozilla Tech Speakers Program was created. Mozilla Tech Speakers is a Mozilla Developer Relations (DevRel) program to educate, empower and give back to volunteer Technical Evangelists in regional and […]

The post Joining the Mozilla Tech Speakers Phase 2 – Summer 2016 appeared first on Bob Reyes Dot Com.


Rep of the Month – May 2016
mkohler on July 15, 2016 08:56 AM

Please join us in congratulating Konstantina Papadea as Rep of the Month for May.

Konstantina is a long-time Mozilla Reps from Greece. Additionally she is also responsible for the budget and swag requests in the Reps program.

In the past months Konstantina has helped out with organizing and chairing the Reps weekly call together with Ioana. That means that they are weekly in contact with many mozillians to find new interesting topics and prepare the agenda and the notifications. Further she is helping the Council with the formation of the Review Team we are implementing. This was already announce here and will give council more time to spend on mission and strategy. She became a mentor and will help inspire the new people applying for the program.

Please don’t forget to congratulate her on Discourse!


MozillaIN Planning Meet up 2016
Vitchu on July 12, 2016 07:50 PM

Mozilla India is one of the biggest contributor community and vibrant one. For past few years we are growing very strongly and consistently. Last year 2015 was very amazing year for us, after Taskforce meetup, we contributors had ambition to bring much more contributors, due to this aim number of student contributors grown to huge number due to this everyone had some confusion like how to report the events and contributors they have brought and events they have done, then how to highlight the contribution done by the contributor near them, this should some ways to bring regional communities. Even we in Tamilnadu started a small regional community named MozillaTN with the aim to highlight the contributors in our Tamilnadu so it will be exciting for others to contribute on seeing them, like me everyone  had aim to not to move out of Mozilla India community goal. So to make sure the amazing contributors are recognized and everyone goals are align we had Community India planning meetup.

I reached bit late to session on first day, joined from session handled by Haiyya  where we learned more about Story telling. It was one of awesome session where we learnt more about us and to project us.

Then George jumped in and started to share what are the vision of Mozilla and Mozilla’s area of focus for the next 6 months. Shared those amazing areas below

      1. Firefox/Context Graph/TestPilot
      2. Future of Platform/Servo
      3. Connected Devices
      4. Mozilla Issues Agenda and Advocacy
      5. Mozilla Leadership Network

Then we divided among us into 5 different groups to learn what are these areas and to share with remaining other contributors. I had opportunity to form team with Ankit and Faisal, one of amazing  people. Had good time to interact with them and work with them.

Among those areas listed above, I am glad I am closely following what happening at 1 & 3, then trying to learn 2.

Then we had the design session on forming the Task Force teams. Before that we got to know how the Mozilla India task force team was started and what was its goal by Vineel and Deb. These two are amazing people who used to come forward first whenever we need any help.

Then again we divided as 5 members team and started working on how we should have the task force team for Indian community in future. This time I was sitting with Vineel, Mehul, Prathamesh, Anivar and George was note taking all the points we were discussing. Then the consolidated points were shared by George and Vineel

Some of my suggestion was, there should be an easy way for  all sub communities to inherit task force model, functional contribution areas should be there in task force team, and then there should be a team which can work with all the team to work on exciting projects and get it done.

Then we had quick discussion on what happened on that day, and we had grand dinner at hotel and then left to where we stay. And amazing group photo at venue.

Then next day we started the main session with what are the goals of Mozilla India community meetup, tentative date when it will happen.

So my suggestions were like finding new ways of recognition (letter or appreciation , Linkedin recommendation and so on), determining ways for cross sub-community communication. Then we got a chance to learn how Mozilla India community started, which is an interesting and surprise session by Vineel. His talk was always well organized, calm and exciting.

Then we got chance to split and take some amazing responsibilities to work for upcoming days. I got chance to contribute as Regional Co-oridnator  along with Mehul, Akhil. We three are responsible to check whether our learning at this Meetup is shared, finding exciting leaders from different parts of countries to share what happened at planning meetup and will also pull up some other ways to contribute, planning to contact various Mozilla Employees with whom I am in touch to know what is their teams focus but for this role also we have an amazing team (staff / functional team) members Sayak and Anivar. There is logistics team which includes Prathamesh, Chandrakant ji , Sayak who is going to take care of the upcoming meeting, they are responsible for making meetup huge success  and to document whatever happens  we have Ankit, Kailas, Harsha and the we have to do facilitation during meetup and bring amazing contents for that we have very huge team of 5 members Mayur, Anup, Priyanka, Meghraj, Diva, and there is an amazing team who is going to find the shape of taskforce team and form structure of Mozilla India  Deb, Vnisha, Prathamesh, Vineel, George +2 people (from the broader Mozilla India community who show great interest and meet).

Then we were discussing how the contributors should be in general, we had some of the amazing selection criteria shared to Mozilla participation team. It was very interesting to sit and discuss with Deb, Sayak , Anivar and Diva regarding this and share our thoughts.

Some of the learning from this meetup is we should have Clear point and should know well to express them, it comes by experience. And a good community members loves to hear form other and then gives positive suggestions. There are contributors who are very committed to the mission and what they contribute, it is purely not committed in terms of hours but it is whole hearted.

I had chance to interact with Chandrakanth ji, he is one of amazing person, helped me whenever i got lost in Pune. I used to talk with him in telegram, finally got chance to meet him.  He was interested to mentor amazing contributors who are ready to learn new things and contribute to community. Hope I can find contributors here, so we can learn from him.

I should say thanks for Sayak who was there with me till  my flight.

There are many contributors around India who are committed, have lots of energy to contribute and share their knowledge and motivated to take amazing initiatives. It may look like India has lot of sub-communities but we are always standing together to contribute and share our knowledge to others. The upcoming meetup will be bringing lot of new contributors who were learning and talking in online to meet offline, it will be amazing days to choose what we will be driving in our contribution areas. The new journey is about to begin soon with amazing Goal settings and learning.



Report from Mozilla India Planning Meetup 2016
birajkarmakar on July 12, 2016 07:20 AM

Hope we all may aware that Mozilla India Planning Meetup 2016 was held on 09-10th July 2016 in C-DAC Pune, India. This is an invitation only event hosted by Mozilla India Community with people from different sub communities based on gender diversity, regional representation, activities and leadership in community. This event will mainly focus on developing options for the direction, vision, strategy and roadmap of the Mozilla India community, and undertaking detailed planning of the second phase that involves the tentative Mozilla India Gathering in Pune, August 26-28, 2016.

Here I am going to write the full report of each and everything that was happened in the event.

This event was super excited for me because of two reasons, I was happy to part of this event for revamping the structure for Mozilla India as well as it was great opportunity to meet some enthusiastic Mozillians around our Mozilla India community.

Here is event agenda.

We started our very first day by filling out one survey based on our experience as a Mozillian – this looks like we are giving an exam. Our awesome fellow mozillian Ankit collected all the survey papers.

 

Then we were taking opportunity to introduce ourselves.

       

First of all a big thank you to  for coming here and facilitating this event.

Then Haiyya organized a fabulous session on story telling – how we can inspire, motivate other mozillian by describing our story.

  

After that George started sharing about the direction of Mozilla, and 5 important areas of Mozilla’s future strategies.

Reference docs for 5 important areas of Mozilla’s future strategy

      1. Firefox/Context Graph/TestPilot
      2. Future of Platform/Servo
      3. Connected Devices
      4. Mozilla Issues Agenda and Advocacy
      5. Mozilla Leadership Network

Then we have been divided in five group and worked on future strategy. Then we showed our  working templates to others.

 

Here our team was showing our strategic planning on Mozilla Leadership Network.

After that Veteran Community Mentor and Leader Vineel shared growth story of Mozilla India, that was inspiring.

At last we had a discussion on redesigning of Task Force though different ideas.

Here my team was proposing tightly structured design of Task Force. Though this is not final structure. In next week or so, we will open it for every community members to vote or comment on the available proposal/structure to make it more transparent and open. Stay tune for that.

After that we concluded this event by sharing what we have learnt from that day.

This is how the event was ended. Then we headed to Mainland Chaina for dinner.

On the second day, we were gathered in opening circle by sharing our insights of last day event lessons.

That day was truly focused on main meetup. So we immediately started planning on goals.

Then Vineel, Ankit, Vinisha and Kailas helped to categorized it in few topics.

Then again we were divided in 5 teams and each team worked on each. Here are the draft sheet of each goals.

At a glance – drafted goals for the meetup
  1. Develop a strategy, direction and plan for the future of the community
  2. Re-structure the Mozilla India community — structures and processes
  3. Increase the leadership/mobilizing skills of the attendees (and develop strong onboarding programs for new community members)
  4. Improve communication processes and tools, and transparency
  5. Build strong teams
  6. Build strong recognition practices
  7. Create accountability systems and a code of conduct
  8. Build a plan for increasing diversity and inclusive practice across the community

After working on planning, we started working on criteria of participant’s selection for the main meetup. Though this is not final. We are working on this.

Then we selected date and place for the upcoming meetup. Name has not been selected yet. Hope very soon we announce name of event with every details.

After that we started creating working groups for planning the main meetup. Every working group has built a roadmap for the next 6-weeks.

(1) Communication

Biraj, Vishal, Ashish, Siddhartha, Shaguftha

(2) Logistics

Prathamesh, Chandrakant, Sayak

(3) Regional Coord + Invitatations

Mehul, Akhil, Viswaprasath

(4) Staff/functional coordination

Sayak, Anivar

(5) Documentation

Ankit, Kailas, Harsha

(6) Content/facilitation

Mayur, Anup, Priyanka, Meghraj, Diva

(7) Strategy/Structure for Mozilla India

Deb, Vnisha, Prathamesh, Vineel, George

 Communication working group’s draft roadmap for 6 weeks is here

This working group is focused on Strategy/Structure for Future Mozilla India

Deb, Vnisha, Prathamesh, Vineel, George +2 people (from the broader Mozilla India community who show great interest and meet).

Then we concluded this event by committing to bringing this meetup back to our local communities. That’s why we need to host MozCafe as soon as possible with every regional community.

Special thanks goes to Grorge Roter, Umesh Agarwal, Faisal Aziz, Shahid Ali Farooqui and whole pune community  for organizing this wonderful event.

After all, we got huge success in this event. But we have to do lot of work.

“We have rebooted now!
Let’s run the program” — This is my quote.

Yes Mozilla Kolkata is going to arrange MozCafe@Kolkata on 17 July, 2016, Sunday,  4 PM to 6 PM and place: An Idea . RSVP here .

Looking for tweets and facebook post from the event?

All Pics were taken by me and Harsha.

Though this is very long but I tried to keep it more productive by using more pics and less text.

Hope you enjoyed reading my blog.

Thanks!

 

 


Filed under: mozilla event Tagged: 2016, biraj, biraj karmakar, birajkarmakar, blog, mozilla, Mozilla India planning meetup 2016, mozillaIN, remo

Telugu l10n – Report
Dinesh Mv on July 11, 2016 06:00 AM

Hey there,

Its been a long time since i write any blog post about my contributions and now am excited to share this with you. There you go!

What I really like at Mozilla is the diverse community and the contribution paths. A couple of months back, I have been accepted into REMO- Mozilla Reps program. I am excited to continue my contributions as a Rep now.

Cut to the chase, it’s been around 6 months since I took the responsibilities of Telugu localization. Now, I am glad to publish the growth of statistics for my locale. When I started contributing to l10n, these statistics are very poor compared to the locales other than Indic-locales and the rate of retention of contributors is very less. To make it better, I started working on it.

 Report from last 6months for Telugu locale:

The major areas we focused to localize are SUMO knowledge Base (since 90,00,000+ visitors refer to 28.000+ times available documents of our SUMO knowledge base every week) and Mozilla l10n projects.

SUMO l10n:

  • Number of articles localized: 170+ KB articles
  • Number of templates localized: 74 (100%)
  •  Localized SUMO UI strings: 3286 (100%)

Over 10 contributors helped us to achieve these goals from the last 6 months. I really appreciate every one for their contributions. Special thanks to our all-time SUMO stars Sandeep and Jayesh for their awesomeness.

Telugu l10n projects:

These are the few projects which we worked on/still working. In the first half of 2016, these are some of the projects which we kick-started and localized completely:

  • SUMO
  • Firefox for iOS
  • Firefox Hello
  • Firefox input
  • Pontoon Intro

And we are still working on few other huge projects.

Overall 15000+ out of 16967 strings have been localized so far from telugu team in which 5000+ strings are localized in the previous half of 2016 in pontoon and in mozilla locamotion. Since, our localizers are very much comfortable with pontoon, we are likely to request few more projects to pontoon platform soon.

I hope our team will hit few more goals in the next half of 2016.

Thank you everyone for your support!

You rock!

 

 


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