Planet Mozilla Reps

Reps Weekly Call – February 26th 2015
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on February 27, 2015 01:10 PM

Last Thursday we had our weekly call about the Reps program, where we talk about what’s going on in the program and what Reps have been doing during the last week.

Summary
  • RepsIDMeetup
  • Alumni status and leaving SOP
  • New mentors coming soon
  • GMRT event Pune
  • Teach The Web Talks
  • FOSS Asia
  • BuddyUp
  • Say Hello Day

Detailed notes

AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next week!


Impact teams: a new approach for functional impact at Reps
Rosana on February 27, 2015 09:02 AM

When the new participation plan was forming one of the first questions was: how can the Reps program enable more and deeper participation in Mozilla? We know that Reps are empowering local and regional communities and have been playing an important role in various project like Firefox OS launches, but there wasn’t an organized and more importantly scalable way to provide support to functional teams at Mozilla. The early attempts of the program to help connect volunteers with functional areas were the Special Interest Groups (SIG). Although in some cases and for some periods of time the SIGs worked very well and were impactful, they wasn’t sustainable in the long run. We couldn’t provide a structure that ensured mutual benefit and commitment.

With the renewed focus on participation we’re trying to think differently about the way that Reps can connect to functional teams, align with their goals and participate in every part of Mozilla. And this is where the “Impact teams” come in. Instead of forming loose interest groups, we want to form teams that work well together and are defined by the impact they are having, as well as excited by future opportunity to not only have deeper participation but personal growth as part of a dedicated team where colleagues include project staff.

The idea of these new impact teams is to make sure that the virtuous circle of mutual benefit is created. This means that we will work with functional teams to ensure that we find participation opportunities for volunteers that have direct impact on project goals, but at the same time we make sure that the volunteers will benefit from participating, widening their skills, learning new ones.

These teams will crystallize through the work on concrete projects, generating immediate impact for the team, but also furthering the skills of volunteers. That will allow the impact team to take on bigger challenges with time: both volunteers and functional teams will learn to collaborate and volunteers with new skills will be able to take the lead and mentor others.

We’re of course at the beginning and many questions are still open. How can we organize this in an agile way? How can we make this scalable? Will the scope of the role of Reps change if they are more integrated in functional activities? How can we make sure that all Mozillians, Reps and non Reps are part of the teams? Will we have functional mentors? And we think the only way to answer those questions is to start trying. That’s why we’re talking to different functional areas, trying to find new participation opportunities that provide value for volunteers. We want to learn by doing, being agile and adjusting as we learn.

The impact teams are therefore not set in stone, we’re working with different teams, trying loose structures and specially putting our energy into making this really beneficial for both functional teams and volunteers. Currently we are working to the Marketplace team, the Firefox OS Market research team and the developer relations team. And we’ll be soon reaching out to Mozillians and Reps who have a track record in those areas to ask them to help us build these impact teams.

We’re just at the beginning of a lot of pilots, tests, prototypes. But we’re excited to start moving fast and learn! We have plenty of work to do and many questions to answer, join us in shaping these new impact teams. Specially help us now how your participation at Mozilla can benefit your life, make you grow, learn, develop yourself. Emma Irwin is working on making education a centerpiece of participation, but do you have any other ideas? Share them with us!


Treffen der deutschsprachigen Mozilla Gemeinschaft – Tag 2 (DE / EN)
Michael Kohler on February 27, 2015 02:33 AM

(English version below every paragraph)

Das ist der dritte Eintrag zum Treffen der deutschsprachigen Mozilla Gemeinschaft. Insgesamt werden drei Teile veröffentlicht. Die vorherigen Teile findest du hier: Tag 0, Tag 1, Tag 2 .

This is the third post regarding the German-speaking Mozilla community meetup. There will be three parts in total. You can find all previous parts here: day 0, day 1, day 2 .

Das Treffen fand vom 20. bis am 22. Februar 2015 statt. Um die Koordination unter den Freiwilligen im deutschsprachigen Raum (Deutschland, Österreich, Schweiz) zu gewährleisten, treffen wir uns jährlich um unsere Pläne und Ziele für das jeweilige Jahr zu definieren. Zusätzlich ist es natürlich auch wichtig, sich von Zeit zu Zeit zu treffen, da einige Diskussionen einfacher und schneller in einem Gespräch vor Ort geführt werden können. Insgesamt haben 27 Personen teilgenommen.

The meetup was held on February 20 to February 22 2015. To facilitate the coordination between all volonteers and staff living/working in the German speaking countries (Germany, Austria, Switzerland) we meet once a year to discuss any topics, plans and goals for the year. Further it’s important to meet regularly to have certain discussions in person since these are faster and more efficient. In total 27 persons attended this meetup.

 (Foto/Photo: Hagen Halbach)

Tag 2 / day 2

Am Sonntag starteten wir auch um 10:00 Uhr im Berliner Büro.

On Sunday we once again started at 10am at the Berlin Office.

eginn Ende Thema Dauer
10:00 13:00 Planung 2015 / Events / Ziele / Rollenverteilung etherpad 45′ Alle
13:00 13:45 Inhalt mozilla.de 45′ Alle
13:45 14:15 IRC Meeting + Zusammenfassung Treffen 30′ Alle
14:00 Abreise oder weitere Diskussionen Alle

Zuerst trafen wir uns wieder in den Gruppen, um die Ziele zu besprechen. Danach versammelten wir uns wieder, um diese gemeinsam zu besprechen und zu notieren.

At first we had the same breakout groups again, this time to evaluate goals for 2015. After that we discussed those together with the whole group and decided on goals.

Lokalisierung / Localization

Die Lokalisierung-Gruppe hat einige Punkte ausgearbeitet. Zum einen wurden diverse Wiki-Seiten überarbeitet und aktualisiert, zum andern wurden diverse Themen besprochen. Die gesamte Übersicht gibt’s hier.

The l10n group has worked out a few points. First they updated multiple wiki pages. Second they discussed several other topics. You can find the overview of topics here.

Ziele / Goals:

  • Dokumentation auf dem Wiki fertigstellen / finish the documentation on the wiki
  • “Localizers in Training” anschreiben und nachfragen / get in touch with the “Localizers in Training”

SUMO

SUMO hat eine Einführung in die neuen Tools durchgeführt. Zusätzlich wurden einige Ziele formuliert.

SUMO has done an introduction into the new tools. Further they decided on a few goals.

Ziele / Goals:

  • 90% der Artikel sollen immer übersetzt sein / have 90% of all articles on SUMO translated all the time
  • Zu den Firefox Releases sollen immer die wichtigsten 100 Artikel übersetzt sein / for Firefox releases all of the top 100 articles should be translated

Programmierung / Programming

Die “Programmierung” Gruppe hat auch einige interessante Sachen ausgebearbeitet. Alles hier aufzulisten wäre zu viel. Daher sei euch ein Blick auf ihr Etherpad gegönnt.

Ziele / Goals:

  • “Mozilla Day” veranstalten (nicht nur für Entwickler) / Organize a “Mozilla Day” (this does not only cover developers)
  • Vortrag zu Jetpack abhalten / give a talk on Jetpack
  • Rust Meetups weiterführen / continue the Rust meetups
  • Developer Meetups in Berlin / developer meetups in Berlin
  • 5 neue Mozilla Entwickler rekrutieren / recruit 5 new dev contributors

Community Builing

In der “Community Building” Gruppe haben wir diverse Themen besprochen. Unter anderem haben wir angeschaut, was momentan funktioniert und was nicht. Wir haben auch über Firefox Student Ambassadors und Recognition gesprochen. Hier gibt’s den Gesamtüberblick.

In the community building group we talked about different topics. For example we looked at what’s working now and what’s not. Further we talked about Firefox Student Ambassadors and recognition. You can find the overview here.

Ziele / Goals:

  • mind. 10 FSA bis Jahresende / have at least 10 FSA until the end of the year
  • 2 neue Reps im Norden von Deutschland / have 2 new Reps in the north of Germany
  • WoMoz / get WoMoz started (this is a difficult task, let’s see)
  • Visuelle Identität (Logo) fertigstellen bis Ende 2. Quartal / finish the visual identity (logo) until end of Q2
  • mind. 5 Events in Städten, die vorher noch kein Event hatten / have at least 5 events in cities, where we never did events before
  • Mozilla Day / Weekend
  • “Onboarding” Prozess definieren / define onboarding process
  • Besseres Format für das wöchentliche Meeting / better format for the weekly meeting

Webseiten / Websites

Alle deutschen Mozilla Seiten laufen momentan auf dem Server von Kadir. Da Kadir nicht mehr so viel Zeit hat, wäre es gut, wenn alles zu “Community IT” umgezogen wird. Dies wurde am Meetup besprochen und für “OK” befunden. Der Bug dazu befindet sich hier.

All German Mozilla sites are currently hosted by Kadir. Since Kadir doesn’t have enough time to support them, the goal is to move them to Community IT. This was agreen upon at the community meetup. You can find the relevant bug here.

Ziel / Goal:

  • Alle Seiten umziehen / transfer all sites
  • Inhalt von mozilla.de überarbeiten / refresh the mozilla.de content

Alle diese Ideen, Pläne und Ziele sind in einem Trello-Board zusammengefasst. Jeder der deutschsprachigen Gemeinschaft kann sich da einem Eintrag zuordnen und daran arbeiten. Mit diesem wollen wir die verschiedenen Pläne und Ziele übers Jahr hindurch verfolgen und abarbeiten.

All these plans and goals are summarized in our Trello board. All German speaking community members can self-assign a task and work on it. With this board we want to track and work on all our plans.

 (Foto/Photo: Hagen Halbach)

Danach haben wir uns über den Inhalt von mozilla.de unterhalten. Grundsätzlich wird der Inhalt komplett überarbeitet. Hier die Liste an Funktionen, die die neue Seite haben soll.

After that we discussed what features should be on the mozilla.de website. In general, all the content will be updated.

  • Produkt- und Projektübersicht / product and project overview
  • Landeseite (Community Tile) / landing page for the community tile
  • Liste von Veranstaltungen / list of events
  • Download-Button
  • Link auf “Contribute” / link to “contribute”
  • Link auf Mailingliste (kein Support!) / link to the mailing list (no support!)
  • Link auf den Newsletter / link to the newsletter
  • Planet
  • Social Media
  • Prominenter Link auf SUMO / prominent link to SUMO for help
  • Link Wörterbücher / link to the dictionaries

(Foto/Photo: Hagen Halbach)

Am Ende haben wir uns über das wöchentliche Meeting unterhalten und einen Vorschlag ausgearbeitet, um dieses effizienter zu machen. Folgende Anpassungen werden durchgeführt, sobald die Einzelheiten geklärt sind (wird über die Mailingliste diskutiert). Bis dahin bleibt alles beim Alten.

At the end we talked about our weekly meeting and drafted a proposal how to make it more efficient. The following changes will be done once everything is clear (we’re discussing this on the mailing list). Until then everything stays the same.

  • Verschiebung von wöchentlich auf zweiwöchentlich / biweekly instead of weekly
  • nicht mehr nur IRC, sondern Vidyo (Videochat-Programm) / Vidyo instead of IRC
  • Alles wird wie gewohnt in einem Etherpad dokumentiert, so dass auch andere mitdiskutieren können / document everything on the Etherpad so everybody can join without Vidyo
    • Workflow: Etherpad -> Meeting -> Etherpad
  • Die finalen Einträge aus dem Etherpad werden ins Wiki abgelegt, da diese dort durchsuchbar sind / the final meeting notes will be copied to the Wiki from the Etherpad

 

Feedback / Lessions learned (nur Englisch, da nur für Mozilla Reps relevant)

  • planning long-term before events makes sense
  • the office is a good location for these kind of meetups, but not for bigger ones
  • there is never enough time to discuss everything together, so individual breakouts are necessary

 

Ich möchte mich bei allen Teilnehmer für die informativen und konstruktiven Diskussionen bedanken. Ich glaube, dass wir einiges zu tun haben im 2015, wenn wir jedoch die Motivation vom Treffen mitnehmen können und unsere Pläne und Ziele umsetzen können, wird dies ein sehr erfolgreiches Jahr. Alle Fotos vom Treffen findet ihr auf flickr.

I’d like to thank all attendees who participated in very informative and constructive discussions during the weekend. I think that we have a lot to do in 2015. If we can save the motivation from this meetup and work on our defined plans and goals, we’ll have a very successful year. You can find all pictures of the meetup on flickr.


Treffen der deutschsprachigen Mozilla Gemeinschaft – Tag 1 (DE / EN)
Michael Kohler on February 27, 2015 02:33 AM

(English version below every paragraph)

Das ist der zweite Eintrag zum Treffen der deutschsprachigen Mozilla Gemeinschaft. Insgesamt werden drei Teile veröffentlicht. Die weiteren findest du hier: Tag 0, Tag 1, Tag 2 .

This is the second post regarding the German-speaking Mozilla community meetup. There will be three parts in total. You can find all other parts here: day 0, day 1, day 2 .

Das Treffen fand vom 20. bis am 22. Februar 2015 statt. Um die Koordination unter den Freiwilligen im deutschsprachigen Raum (Deutschland, Österreich, Schweiz) zu gewährleisten, treffen wir uns jährlich um unsere Pläne und Ziele für das jeweilige Jahr zu definieren. Zusätzlich ist es natürlich auch wichtig, sich von Zeit zu Zeit zu treffen, da einige Diskussionen einfacher und schneller in einem Gespräch vor Ort geführt werden können. Insgesamt haben 27 Personen teilgenommen.

The meetup was held on February 20 to February 22 2015. To facilitate the coordination between all volonteers and staff living/working in the German speaking countries (Germany, Austria, Switzerland) we meet once a year to discuss any topics, plans and goals for the year. Further it’s important to meet regularly to have certain discussions in person since these are faster and more efficient. In total 27 persons attended this meetup.

 (Foto/Photo: Brian King)

 

Tag 1 / day 1

Am Samstag um 10:00 Uhr ging’s los mit dem ersten offiziellen Tag.

On Saturday we started the first official day at 10am.

Beginn Ende Thema Dauer Wer
10:00 10:30 Kennenlernen, Mozilla allgemein 30′ Alle
10:30 12:00 Einführende Diskussionen + Mozilla Goals 1h 30′ Alle
12:00 13:00 Diskussionen / Planung in Gruppen 1h Gruppen
13:00 14:00 Mittagessen im Office 1h Alle
14:00 15:30 Rückmeldung der Gruppenarbeiten + Diskussionen 1h 30′ Alle
16:30 17:30 Participation 2015 (Englisch) 1h Alle
17:30 19:00 Community Tiles 1h 30′ Alle
20:00 22:00 Abendessen 2h 30′ Alle

Wir eröffneten das Treffen mit einer kurzen Vorstellungsrunde, da sich noch nicht alle gekannt haben. Es war schön zu sehen, dass aus allen Ecken des Mozilla Projektes Leute angereist sind, um die Zukunft zu planen.

We began the meetup with a short introduction round since not all of the attendees knew each other. It was nice to see that from all around the Mozilla projects people came to Berlin to discuss and plan the future.

Danach führte uns Brian in die Ziele und Pläne von Mozilla für das Jahr 2015 ein. Dabei standen vorallem Firefox (wieder mehr Fokus auf Desktop), Firefox OS (Benutzer-getriebene Strategie), Content Services (Differenziertheit von Einkommen) und Webmaker im Vordergrund. Damit wir unsere Ziele definieren können, müssen wir auch die Ziele von Mozilla kennen.

After that Brian introduced us to Mozilla’s goals and plans for 2015. Firefox (more focus on Desktop this year), Firefox OS (user driven strategy), Content Services (differentiate income) and Webmaker were the focus. To reach our goals for the community we also need to know about Mozilla’s overall goals so we can align them.

Nach dieser Einführung haben wir den momentanen Status der Gemeinschaft bestimmt. Dies wurde anhand einer SWOT-Analyse gemacht (Stärken, Schwächen, Möglichkeiten, Gefahren).

To know where we currently stand with our community, we did a “SWOT” analysis (Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats).

Stärken / Strengths:

  • L10N: umgesetzte Menge und Qualität / L10N: amount of work that was done and the quality of it
  • Viele Projekte in der Gemeinschaft vertreten / a lot of different projects are worked on by the community
  • Wir hatten mehr Events als in 2013 / we had more (and more impactful) events in 2013
  • Spontanität / spontanous

Schwächen / Weaknesses:

  •  Viel Arbeit / a lot of work
  • “Bus Faktor” / “bus factor”
  • Kommunikation / communication
  • Wenige Social Media Aktivitäten / not a lot of social media activities
  • Wöchentliche Meetings sind nicht effizient genug / weekly meetings aren’t very efficient
  • ….

Möglichkeiten / Opportunities:

  • Web Standards
  • Rust
  • Datenschutz / privacy
  • Firefox Student Ambassadors

Gefahren / Threats:

  • Fragmentierung / fragmentation
  • Chrome + Google Services

 (Foto/Photo: Hagen Halbach)

Danach haben wir uns in diverse Gruppen aufgeteilt, um gruppenspezifische Arbeiten zu erledigen und zu diskutieren. Dazu gehören “Lokalisierung”, “Programming”, “Community Building” und “Webseiten”.

We splitted up in different groups to discuss group-specific topics and report back to everybody. We had “Localization”, “Developer Engagement / Programming”, “Community Building” and “Websites”.

Nach dieser Gruppenarbeit kamen wir zusammen und haben bereits erste Ergebnisse diskutiert. Weitere Informationen zu den Arbeitsergebnissen dieser Gruppe folgen im Beitrag zum Tag 2.

We discussed the first outcomes of the groups together. Please refer to day 2 to see the results.

Am Samstag kam Markus vorbei. Markus möchte regelmässige Veranstaltungen in Berlin durchführen, um die Präsenz von Mozilla in Berlin zu vergrössern und eine lokale Gemeinschaft zu gründen. Wir begrüssen diese Idee natürlich und werden in 2015 Markus mit dabei unterstützen!

Markus, a local developer from Berlin, came by on Saturday. He’d like to organize regular events in Berlin to increase the presence of Mozilla in the city and to build a local community. We like this idea and will support him in 2015!

 (Foto/Photo: Mario Behling)

Nach der Gruppendiskussion hatte Brian eine weitere Information: Participation. Hier verweise ich gerne auf den Blogeintrag von Mark Surman, um das genauer zu erklären.

After the group discussions Brian had further information: Participation. Please refer to Mark Surman’s blogpost to get more information about that.

Als Abschluss des offiziellen Teil des Tages führten wir eine Diskussion über das sogenannte “Community Tile”. Bei Firefox wird bei neuen Profilen beim Öffnen von neuen Tabs eine Übersicht an diversen Kacheln angezeigt. Eine dieser Kacheln ist für die Gemeinschaft reserviert und kann dafür verwendet werden. Wir diskutierten und sind zum Schluss gekommen, dass es sich bei diesem Link um eine Seite handeln sollte, welche die deutschsprachige Gemeinschaft erklärt und den Benutzern mitteilt, wer Mozilla ist und dass auch Leute aus dem deutschsprachigen Teil der Welt daran mitarbeiten.

At the end of the official part of the day we had a discussion about the “Community Tile”. When you open a new tab in a new Firefox profile you’ll see an overview of different sites you can visit. One of these links is reserved for the community. We discussed our proposal and came to the conclusion that we should focus to tell everyone what the German speaking community does and especially that there are local people working on Mozilla projects.

 

 

(Foto/Photo: Hagen Halbach)

Ihr fragt euch, wer alles mit dabei war? Seht selbst!

Want to see who was there? See for yourself!

 

 (Foto/Photo: Brian King)

Ich möchte mich bei allen Teilnehmer für die informativen und konstruktiven Diskussionen bedanken. Ich glaube, dass wir einiges zu tun haben im 2015, wenn wir jedoch die Motivation vom Treffen mitnehmen können und unsere Pläne und Ziele umsetzen können, wird dies ein sehr erfolgreiches Jahr. Alle Fotos vom Treffen findet ihr auf flickr.

I’d like to thank all attendees who participated in very informative and constructive discussions during the weekend. I think that we have a lot to do in 2015. If we can save the motivation from this meetup and work on our defined plans and goals, we’ll have a very successful year. You can find all pictures of the meetup on flickr.

Nun geht es weiter mit dem Tag 2.

Now continue reading day 2.


Treffen der deutschsprachigen Mozilla Gemeinschaft – Tag 0 (DE / EN)
Michael Kohler on February 27, 2015 02:32 AM

(English version below every paragraph)

Das ist der erste Eintrag zum Treffen der deutschsprachigen Mozilla Gemeinschaft. Insgesamt werden drei Teile veröffentlicht. Die weiteren findest du hier: Tag 0, Tag 1, Tag 2 .

This is the first post regarding the German-speaking Mozilla community meetup. There will be three parts in total. You can find all other parts here: day 0, day 1, day 2 .

Das Treffen fand vom 20. bis am 22. Februar 2015 statt. Um die Koordination unter den Freiwilligen im deutschsprachigen Raum (Deutschland, Österreich, Schweiz) zu gewährleisten, treffen wir uns jährlich um unsere Pläne und Ziele für das jeweilige Jahr zu definieren. Zusätzlich ist es natürlich auch wichtig, sich von Zeit zu Zeit zu treffen, da einige Diskussionen einfacher und schneller in einem Gespräch vor Ort geführt werden können. Insgesamt haben 27 Personen teilgenommen.

The meetup was held on February 20 to February 22 2015. To facilitate the coordination between all volonteers and staff living/working in the German speaking countries (Germany, Austria, Switzerland) we meet once a year to discuss any topics, plans and goals for the year. Further it’s important to meet regularly to have certain discussions in person since these are faster and more efficient. In total 27 persons attended this meetup.

 

 (Foto/Photo: Hagen Halbach)

 

Vorbereitung / Preparation

Da es sich dieses Jahr um ein zweitägiges Treffen gehandelt hat, war dementsprechend auch die Vorbereitung aufwändiger. Durch die Hilfe von Hagen Halbach konnten wir das aber ohne grössere Probleme bewältigen. Wichtig war hierbei auch, dass wir mit der Planung bereits im Oktober begonnen haben und so Zeit hatten, alles zu buchen und zu planen.

Because this was a two day – event the preparation took more time than the years before. Due to Hagen Halbach’s help we could manage this without any blocker. We already started to plan this event in October, this probably saved us a few sleepless nights and we had time to plan out everything and book on time.

Da Berlin (fast) von überall gut erreichbar ist und Mozilla da ein Büro hat, haben wir uns sehr schnell entschieden, das Treffen da abzuhalten. So mussten wir auch nicht ein Büro finden, was ggf. gekostet hätte.

Since traveling to Berlin is easy from (almost) anywhere and Mozilla has an office there, we quickly decided to organize the meetup there. To save costs this is a great way since we would have needed to find another place otherwise.

Hiermit ein grosses Dankeschön an Hagen (Mithilfe bei der Gesamtorganisation), Martyna (Hilfe beim Organisieren des Büros und Essens), Robert (Verantwortlicher von Mozilla während dieses Wochenendes) und Brian (Community Manager bei Mozilla) und an alle anderen, welche massgeblich bei der Planung involviert waren.

A big “Thank you” to Hagen (help with the organization), Martyna (all office and food catering inquiries), Robert (responsible for the office during the time) and Brian (Community Manager at Mozilla). Further also a “Thank you” to everyone else who was involved in the planning.

 

Ziele des Treffens / Goals

  • Stand der Gemeinschaft besprechen / discuss the current state of the community
  • Pläne und Ziele für 2015 definieren / define plans and goals for 2015
  • Zusammenhalt stärken und persönliche Gespräche führen / increase the atmosphere and have time for personal discussions

Ich denke, dass wir diese Ziele wunderbar erfüllt haben.

I think we’ve succeeded very well with these goals for the meetup.

 

 (Foto/Photo: Hagen Halbach)

 

Tag 0 / Day 0

Da einige bereits am Freitag angereist sind, haben wir einen (inoffiziellen) “Tag 0″ abgehalten. Im Vorfeld haben wir einige kleine Präsentationen geplant. Diese wurden aber auf den späteren Nachmittag geschoben, da sich sofort interessante Gespräche entwickelt haben.

Since a few people already arrived in Berlin on Friday we organized an inofficial “day 0″. We planned some presentation which we moved to early evening after we saw that there are already a lot of interesting discussions going on.

Kurz vor dem Abendessen habe ich über Mozilla Schweiz gesprochen. Ich habe den Beginn, unsere Events und Erfahrungen erklärt. Ich denke, dass diese auch für die deutschsprachige Gemeinschaft verwendet werden können. Ein grosser Unterschied ist natürlich, dass wir in der Schweiz ohne Probleme ein Treffen in Zürich machen können, ohne viele Teile des Landes auszuschliessen. In Deutschland zum Beispiel sieht das anders aus, da man da nicht ohne grössere Kosten/Zeitaufwand vom Süden in den Norden fahren kann. Für lokale Treffen funktioniert dies aber wunderbar.

Right before the dinner I’ve talked about Mozilla Switzerland. I explained the beginning, our events and experiences. I think this could also inspire the German speaking community. Obviously Switzerland is small since you don’t cut out a lot of partcipants when you organize an event in Zurich. In Germany it’s quite impossible to travel from the south to the north regarding costs/time for a monthly meetup. But for local meetups this concept works great.

Nach dem Abendessen führten wir die Diskussionen weiter, einige haben sogar noch Bugs geflickt und anderen gezeigt, wie das funktioniert.

After dinner we continued our discussions. Some of the attendees even hacked on different projects and showed other how to contribute to these projects.

Ich möchte mich bei allen Teilnehmer für die informativen und konstruktiven Diskussionen bedanken. Ich glaube, dass wir einiges zu tun haben im Jahr 2015, wenn wir jedoch die Motivation vom Treffen mitnehmen können und unsere Pläne und Ziele umsetzen können, wird dies ein sehr erfolgreiches Jahr. Alle Fotos vom Treffen findet ihr auf flickr.

I’d like to thank all attendees who participated in very informative and constructive discussions during the weekend. I think that we have a lot to do in 2015. If we can save the motivation from this meetup and work on our defined plans and goals, we’ll have a very successfull year. You can find all pictures of the meetup on flickr.

Nun geht es weiter mit dem Tag 1.

Now continue reading day 1.


FSA Bootcamp India
birajkarmakar on February 21, 2015 01:05 PM

Yay! We have organized our first FSA Bootcamp India successfully on 14 Feb, 2015 at Mozilla Community Space in Bangalore .  and this is the first FSA Bootcamp throughout the world. Here we invited 50 FSA from different states in India. Though the event was for one day but it was really cool.

On very first day we started with Arcadio Lainez , Product Marketing Manager gave us  Firefox Hello live demo. By which he was explaining in brief all the features and future plans for Hello. Though Hello is built in to the browser using WebRTC (Real-Time Technology) for communication.

Then TJ, Community Manager for FSA joined in video chat. She gave us explanation of how we are growing with FSA program.Even she shared that what are the main key points of this program. Also she mentioned that this program is not only for marketing but also it helps the passionate people to learn new skills, earn recognition, and advance their leadership in not just the Mozilla community, but in their school and local community.

Then we took a small break. FSA have been divided into 4 groups, and in each group 1 Mozilla Rep was there. There everyone  interacted with each other and share cool experiences like

a. What motivated you?
b. What interested you to be part of this amazing global Community?
c. The thing I want to learn.

All the sticky notes

Then Galaxy, Gauthamraj, Viswa, me explained about full structure of Firefox Student Ambassadors program. We gave more insights on club activities, club lead training, new recognition system and many more.

and food was awesome :D

One more point, without our awesome RAL’s help the event might not be well. Also special credit goes to Vineel  who helped a lot throughout the event.

After all, the event was great . At last we have taken some group photos.

More photos https://flic.kr/s/aHsk52xNyj

Hashtags: #FSABootcamp, #MozSpaceBLR

Also I would like to thank Galaxy who did awesome job for this event.


Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: #fsabootcamp, biraj, biraj karmakar, birajkarmakar, FSA, fsabootcampIndia, mozilla, remo

Reps Weekly Call – February 19th 2015
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on February 20, 2015 12:57 PM

Last Thursday we had our weekly call about the Reps program. This time we had a very special and interesting call since it was around the recent changes on the Firefox team with three special guests: Johnathan Nightingale, Mark Mayo and David Slater.

Summary

Johnathan, Mark and David reached out to Reps to explain these recent changes and answer some questions we had for them.

Thanks for coming by, your are invited every Thursday!

Detailed notes
AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next week!


FOSDEM 2015 – Recap
giannisk on February 20, 2015 01:11 AM

Hey all! This year I had the chance to travel to Brussels and attend FOSDEM 2015 as a sponsored Mozilla Rep. As you may already know, FOSDEM is the largest annual gathering of Free & Open Source Software developers, hackers, advocates and enthusiasts in Europe. Every year during the conference more than 5k people (yeap!) travel to Brussels to attend. It’s amazing. So many FOSS-related people from all over the world in the same place. You get to meet good old friends, and also have the chance to meet some new folks who you might have known or been working with virtually but never actually met in person.

Friday 30/Jan
I left home in the morning and got the bus which took me to the Samos Int Airport. The total length of the trip was somewhat 45-50 minutes. Too bad there are not very frequent bus lines traveling to/from the airport. I arrived there about 2 hours before my flight, which is good (and also safe).

When it was time, I boarded the plane and within 45 minutes I had already reached the Athens Int Airport. My next flight to Brussels was again something like 2 hours ahead, but thankfully as a frequent traveler I’ve become an expert on that particular airport so I had no trouble finding some entertainment until the next boarding time.

Anyways. That flight had a total length of approx. 2hrs 45 minutes. I arrived in Brussels in the afternoon and took the train from the airport to the central station. Thankfully I’ve been to Brussels again, so I already knew my way around and had no issues using the public transportation. The hotel was also within walking distance from the station, which was a good thing. I checked-in, but obviously spent little time in the hotel; I went outside and met the other Mozillians that had arrived earlier that day. We had dinner together. Then it was time for the famous FOSDEM beer event in Delirium, which is a must. Delirium offers a very large variety of beers and in fact it has won a Guiness world record for that. Unfortunately, some of us couldn’t stay that much late since we were assigned with booth duties for the next day.

Saturday 31/Jan
Time for FOSDEM! Had a good breakfast in the hotel and along with Christos we took the bus to ULB. It was so much crowded, full of people attending FOSDEM as well. Surprisingly, there seemed to be a detour and since there was no information provided in English we found out about it the hard way. Anyways, we got out in another stop and had to walk for a very few minutes in order to reach the university. Along with the other Reps and Mozillians we set up the Mozilla booth. It was time for Firefox OS Devices and the famous Mozilla Swag.

Fabulous Mozilla Reps at the Booth (photo by Daniele Scasciafratte)

We had a lot of Firefox OS devices, including (but not limited to) Flames, Geeksphone Peaks and Keons, Flatfish Tablets, Alcatel One Touch Fire and ZTE Open C handsets. I had also brought an APC Rock board with me, running Firefox OS and hooked up on a large LCD Screen (thanks Ziggy), which I hope it was a great asset and a major attraction to the booth. A lot of people were so much interested in it and kept asking questions, which I was happy to answer.

We, the Mozilla Reps, were there on the booth to represent Mozilla, to promote our mission and our vision for the open web, to answer questions, to distribute swag and to engage with the participants in general. Thanks to our Firefox OS devices we were able to run both technical and non-technical hands-on representations as well. The booth was so much full of people and busy that day.

After the first day of FOSDEM came to an end, I returned to the hotel completely exhausted. I was actually feeling sick and tired and tried to take a power nap before heading to the mozilla community dinner. I could also barely feel my feet from the pain (been standing all day). After the dinner I couldn’t resist and headed straight back to the hotel to sleep, but I was actually forced by Tim Maks and Stephen to have a beer with them in the hotel lobby

Sunday 01/Feb
I slept well the previous night (I needed to) and reached ULB alone for my booth shift that day. It was apparently snowing that morning, though it was not that strong and it didn’t last enough.

On Sunday we had the Mozilla dev room which, from what I had heard, was filled with people. Other Reps took care of managing the dev room, as I was assigned to the booth for the second day as well. Our tasks at the booth were the same as the previous day. Though there were a lot Mozilla fans busy attending the dev room, I’d say that this didn’t bring down the number of people stepping by the Mozilla booth at all. It was crowded, like the previous day.

Panos Astithas presenting at the Mozilla Dev Room (photo by Christos Bacharakis, CC BY-NC-SA)

During the breaks between my booth shifts I had the chance to visit other project booths, together with Zacharias who was also attending FOSDEM as a Fedora ambassador. And to grab some awesome swag from my favourite projects, of course!

People started packing booths around 5pm. A bit later we packed our booth as well and distributed the remaining swag among us, mostly community members that are planning future events and such. FOSDEM was over. We headed for the hotel and then went on for a last dinner for the sponsored Mozilla Reps. And as it has become a tradition most of us made sure to spend some time in Delirium as well prior to returning back to the hotel. That night Delirium was packed with fellow Greek free and open-source software contributors and developers; there were more than 20 people I would say. Glad to have had so many Greeks there.

Monday 02/Feb
Woke up late in the morning and had breakfast. Along with Elio and fellow Mozilla localizers from Italy we went for a city tour and did some sight-seeing. Took some souvenirs and local chocolates and stuff. Later that day along with Elio we took the train from the central station and reached the airport to catch our flights (seperate ones) back to our homes. My journey didn’t end up here, however. Upon arriving to Athens I had to wait for like 5 hours for my flight to Samos (too bad there aren’t any frequent flights going from/to Samos). But finally I made it back home, completely exhausted though. As far as I remember, I had a very nice 14 hours sleep afterwards (haha, yeah, that’s a lot) in order to replenish energy lost at FOSDEM.

Conclusion
So happy to be part of the Mozilla Reps at FOSDEM for the second consecutive year. Many thanks to ReMo for sponsoring me.

In total, I spent 6 hours on the Mozilla booth on the first day and about 5 hours and something on the second day. During these 11+ hours I never stopped engaging with attendees. I was speaking with people all the time. And as I expected, most of them were asking the same type of questions, which I had no trouble answering, but you know it was tiring to repeat the same answers over and over again. I’m going to make another blog post with frequently asked questions at the booth and the answers I was providing as a Rep.

To be honest, I’ve had so many experiences from running booths for many years (5+), and I can say with confidence that the FOSDEM booth is not that easy to survive. It’s exhausting. But I’m so happy that during my booth shifts I concentrated at what I do best and put a lot passion and effort into spreading ideas and open products I really much care about. And that gives me confidence and motivation to carry on.

Another great FOSDEM for sure and looking forward to it next year. Cheers


Expanding the scope of the Mozilla Reps program
Rosana on February 13, 2015 03:23 PM

This story started in 2011. A group of passionate Mozillians created the Reps program, their goal was to empower Mozilla volunteers all around the world to support the Mozilla mission. They provided visibility to the work of volunteers, created process to have access to resources and a better way to communicate within the community and with staff. It was the Reps themselves, especially the Council and the mentors who shaped this program. Now, counting 457 Reps, the program has evolved to be a powerful platform for community building where leaders from all around the world can emerge.

The Reps program proved to be very successful in building healthy local and regional communities. It also provided a structured connection to Mozilla functional activities when the work is inherently regional, for example with the Firefox OS launches. But as Mozilla grew and became more professional it was harder for volunteers to participate in the global nature of the project: volunteers could run local and regional activities much more easily, but participating in projects aimed at global impact became increasingly difficult.

Now fast Forward to 2015: We have a new participation plan that aims to bring back the balance and revive the participatory nature of Mozilla. Mark Surman’s blog post is a great read: we don’t only want to enable more participation but we want this participation to have value both for Mozilla and for the individual volunteers. And that means that we will empower many more volunteers to take the lead and participate much more deeply in Mozilla to have both local and global impact.

And here is where Reps come in. Our challenge is to make Mozilla much more participatory again, to partner with functional areas and take the lead. To make this successful in the long run we will work on new participation and leadership pathways connecting with functional teams. And we will work on the things that matter the most and make a difference. These pathways will of course provide more opportunities for personal and collective development as well as new leadership opportunities for Mozillians and Reps.

How will this be different from the past? We used to have “Special Interest Groups”, loose groups with an interest in a functional area, but not too many concrete projects or learning opportunities. We want to build on what was working there but shift to “Impact teams”: teams of staff and volunteers who will work hand in hand and where volunteers will be able to get real value out of their participation and will have a clear leadership pathway.

This new approach brings of course a whole new set of challenges: we’ll need to rethink the way we organize the Reps program, the way we empower Reps, mentors and Council and the way we do things in general. Education will be a fundamental part of this. We will need to work all together, Council, Mentors and Reps, to make this happen. And although it will be a lot of hard work I couldn’t be more excited for the changes coming: we’ll be investing so much energy and resources in empowering volunteers and offering new avenues for personal development while having a tangible impact bringing the Mozilla mission forward. I think 2015 will be a great year for Mozilla and the Reps program, join us in shaping this third era of Mozilla and writing the next chapter of the Mozilla Reps history.


Reps Weekly Call – February 12th 2015
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on February 13, 2015 12:20 PM

Last Thursday we had our weekly call about the Reps program, where we talk about what’s going on in the program and what Reps have been doing during the last week.

Summary
  • Word of Mouth Marketing Program
  • Southeast Asian meeting.
  • Paris Reps Leadership meetup.
  • Impact teams.
  • Education.
  • Mozilla Romania & Mozilla Balkans update.

Detailed notes

AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next week!


Kindness in (Open Source and Online) Communities
Emma on February 11, 2015 09:39 PM

Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see.

~Mark Twain

I’ve had this post swirling around in my head for a while.  A post on my experiences and preference to lead, participate and negotiate conflict in online communities through kindness.

I might  be writing it as a proposal to others, but also it might be a bit of therapy to review this strategy for myself.

Kindness is the tone you set for yourself

When we consider approaching community conversation with kindness and patience; when we squash that immediate need to react we’re setting a tone of kindness .  It is not, as you might assume, solely for the benefit of others.  I believe much more that kindness is a selfish act,  siding with optimism for the community conversations  guides  outcomes far more meaningful than ‘being right’, or getting the most of what you came for.

Regret is harder to overcome, than leading with kindness will ever be.

Measure Twice, Respond Once

If  a conversation topic or introduction starts off in a way that makes you feel defensive.  Stop.  Read it again.  I know it’s hard, but looking past negative words  – to find the truth in a conversation often makes the difference to everyone involved.  Negativity could be as a result of events of the past, misconception and defensiveness.  It might have nothing to do with you at all, and so digging out the root of the conversation and focusing there, can bring sunshine.  I actually skim negative, and unprovoked comments altogether as a kindness to myself.

Every personality exists in community.  With the invitation of ‘open’  –  the simple act of getting shit done can come laced with barbs of protest, and  challenge.  Even when it’s clear that intentions may not be positive, reaching out with a benefit of the doubt can often turn that around.  I have found new allies this way.

Sometimes people just want to know they’re being heard.

Have a Point

If you are reaching out with a concern, complaint or comment  have a clear point.  A discombobulation of emotion mixed in with accusations and assumptions  will get you nowhere near the solution you’re seeking.  Instead of writing long posts/emails/forums with an assumption you’ll get push-back – dare to assume  people will respond with a desire to help!  Narrow your point into an ‘ask’, that welcomes feedback.

Make sure your point isn’t simply to ‘be proven correct’, or to expose what little someone else knows. There are better things to do in the world.

You could be wrong.  Learning is often a humbling experience (if you’ve ever watched a babys first steps), but learning and growing is a gift.  Don’t close the door to being wrong.

Check your Ego

If being right is a goal for your communication – then that’s a debate, and those can be good fun when both people sign-up.

However spending time providing the community with your credentials as a way to influence opinion, does far less than the act of listening, acknowledging the points of others, and specifically calling out feedback that helps you. Learn about others, there are some very brilliant, experienced yet quiet people lurking in our community – you may not realize the depth of someone else’s knowledge without making room for it.

Consider entering discussions with the goal of having your mind changed!

Ending with Kindness
By starting kindness with you, you can more easily recognize when your participation becomes of risk to yourself.  Giving people he benefit of the doubt, being open to correction, extending help – whatever kindness matters, does not mean taking people’s crap.  It doesn’t mean accepting abusive behavior or bulling. At. All.  By staying true to the good person you are, bad behavior of others is much more obvious.  You need to do less talking in general.
I’ll end by saying that I don’t think I have all of this covered – I’ve found this approach to work, well often.  But I forget too, I get caught up in negativity, defensiveness and justice – but  ‘what negativity feels like’ only confirms, and brings me back to what I feel is this more centered, and healthy approach.
 I would be interested in other day-to-date strategies for keeping communities, discussion and outcomes positive.
image credit: Mark K

 

 


Firefox OS Awareness Day 2014
Michael Kohler on February 08, 2015 02:05 PM

On the 13.12.2014 we’ve met in Cologne, Germany to have a “Firefox OS Awareness Day”. The goal of this event was to promote Firefox OS in Germany, a very difficult task as it turns out.

Some words about the mobile phone market in Germany

Most of the people under 50 years old in Germany own a smartphone. This is either an Android, iOS, Windows Phone or BlackBerry, but not a lot of Firefox OS devices around. Firefox OS devices are sold at Congstar (online) and O2 (they have shops, but haven’t seen any Firefox OS devices in the shops yet). There are probably three different segments where Firefox OS devices could be considered:

  • Teens who buy their first smartphone (contra: many apps that teens use are not available on Firefox OS yet)
  • Privacy concerned people
  • People over 50 who still use feature phones (but this is a hard segment since most of the time they don’t actually want to spend money on a smartphone since they don’t need the advantages of a smartphone)

Arriving in Cologne

This time we decided to use AirBnB since the hotel costs before Christmas in Cologne are almost insane. We’ve found a nice appartment with enough space to host 4 persons (6 wouldn’t have been a problem either) for a good price. The host was very nice and the checkin was painless. For events with about 4 to 6 Mozillians attending we can look into AirBnB again!

The event on Saturday

Thanks to the great help from the local O2 flagship store (thanks Robert et al!) everything was ready when we arrived at the store a few minutes before opening. Martyna from the Berlin office sent the Firefox costume directly to Cologne. Sören, Philipp, his wife and I we’re ready to show Firefox OS to people within the store and people passing by the store. Sebastian from the German Firefox OS launch team unfortunately couldn’t attend, so we were quite happy to see Philipp’s wife helping us out.

The O2 flagship store is in the middle of the city of Cologne. This also means a lot of people on the street. Since Cologne is quite strict with their rules in public space, we had to make sure that we’re not blocking the street too much. So most of the time we stood in the door of the store without blocking the second entrance. We quickly figured out that this is the best option since for some reason there we’re never a lot of people inside the store. For the people inside the store we had a table with flyers and some Firefox OS swag and several demo phones we could present. There were quite a lot of interested people, but most of them wouldn’t want to exchange their smartphone for a Firefox OS device.

With the Firefox costume we got a lot of attention and a lot of people wanted to shoot pictures with the fox – the same as in Berlin in November. If we didn’t have enough impact for Firefox OS yet, we certainly made a lot of people smile because of us :)

You can find the other pictures we took on Flickr!

Lessons learned

  • The German phone market is almost saturated with Android/iOS
  • Astonishingly a lot of people that do not have a smartphone are happy with it and wouldn’t change for an easy “beginner-friendly” smartphone. This is mostly the population above 60 years.
  • Even though most people were not interested in buying a new smartphone, it was good to get the word out about a mobile phone OS that runs on the Web platform.
  • We’ve met one person who already played with Firefox OS and had a nice chat with him about apps etc. Community building at it’s best since he had never been in contact with the local community.
  • There are a lot of French tourists in Cologne, for the next time we would also print French flyers when doing something near the French border.

Reps Weekly Call – February 5th 2015
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on February 06, 2015 01:03 PM

Last Thursday we had our weekly call about the Reps program, where we talk about what’s going on in the program and what Reps have been doing during the last week.

Summary
  • Council AMA.
  • GNUnify’15.
  • Budget bug mandatory.
  • FOSDEM 2015 recap.
  • Community Education Call.
  • Monday Meeting Ambassadors.

Detailed notes

AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next week!


Mozilla Reps Council AMA
Emma Irwin on February 05, 2015 10:39 AM

Cross-post of Majken Conner’s invitation to participate in the first Mozilla Reps Council AMA.  Come ask us questions this Thursday!


This Thursday, launching during the Reps call, council will be doing a 24h AMA. They’ll be using Discourse, so you only need your Persona account, no need to sign up to Reddit to post. You won’t need to log in to read the AMA.

For those of you that haven’t done an AMA before, AMA stands for “Ask Me Anything.”, made popular by the SubReddit. It’s a way to get to know someone, usually a way to find out what it’s like to have a certain job. The AMA is your chance to get to know the individual council members as people, and also to understand what it’s like to actually be on council. Silly questions are OK, if you’ve always wanted to know what Emma’s favorite colour is, now’s your chance to ask!

Remember to be respectful though, don’t ask something that will probably make someone uncomfortable.

They’ll be keeping track of suggestions and discussions that should be continued outside of the AMA so that they aren’t lost when the event is over. Debates over problems with the program or changes to how it should be run will need more than 24 hours and deserve to be highlighted properly.

The AMA will take place here – https://discourse.mozilla-community.org/c/reps/council-ama

To ask a new question you should start a new topic. Discourse admins will be on-hand to help split out sub-conversations into new threads.

If you want to ask all of council a question, you can address them by typing @repscouncil – Discourse editor will substitute this text with their individual usernames.  You can also use @ to address a single council member, @emma_irwin will notify Emma that you’re addressing her specifically.

The entire council won’t be available at once, but we should have at least one council member available at any time over the full 24h to make sure responses come quickly.

You can also read an FAQ about AMA and how to use Discourse.

Image credit: Ed Schipul


Community Education – Building Together
Emma on February 04, 2015 01:20 AM

So, yesterday I wrote an introductory post : Mozilla Community Education in 2015 with a promise to write a each day leading up to our first Community Education Working Group Call on Thursday.  I wrote about our vision for Community Education as core to the virtuous circle in Mark Surman’s vision  , and how the strength and leadership of the Mozilla Reps  will act as a launching pad for participation across,  and well beyond the project.  Today I want to talk about a vision for virtuous circle of education & learning at Mozilla.

But first, for context – how we’ll be working:

Functional Area Group

“Volunteers who understand Mozilla’s top-level goals feel they have a bigger impact with their contributions”.  

       – David Eaves Contributor Survey of  Mozilla Community

The Mozilla Reps program will be initiating specialized groups for participation.  It might sound a lot like a previous Reps initiative: Special Interest Groups (SIG), and on the surface that’s understandable  – but here’s how they will be different:  these groups will be focused on targeted delivery of functional area goals.  Education & curriculum lending to this success will be curated in partnership with product teams,  and their goals.  We can’t seem to  pick a name for these groups – suggestions?

These will be leadership groups, modeled similarly to the Reps program itself, with a mentorship structure to scale.  Because, this too is a launchpad, group participation needs to expand well beyond reps to be successful.

Pilots

We talked a lot about Pilots in Portland, but we’re just as likely to call these ‘experiments’ because we’re still learning what works.  Right now Pilots are simply time-bound initiatives initiated by request of functional areas, and executed by their Functional Group. Education & Curriculum will mobilize teams to have the impact product teams need. Curriculum in many cases will need to be localized ( so if you are interested in localizing learning content, please let me know!)

Building Together

image credit: Robyn Jay

In the last month, I’ve spoken with many leaders of Education at Mozilla –  amazing people like Laura Hilliger, Janet Swisher, Diane Tate and Hoosteeno (you should read this post on Learning Experiments on MDN), all expertly working in this space of curating and delivering content; their teams already successful at pushing product success through the opportunity of education.

What I’m recognizing is that Community Education can also connect virtuous circle between our teams, with community and with external organizations like Open Hatch. For functional area initiatives and pilots,  we can leverage some of the great work of MDN with ‘Topic in a Box‘, with Webmaker we can perhaps connect and centralize efforts building content for P2PU ‘Course in a Box‘ (and beyond).  With amazing Reps and contributors like Michaela Brown, and MDN learning resources,  it’s  actually realistic to think we can scale Open Hatch + Mozilla events at Universities.  And that’s before I even get to benefits of sharing brain-power, ideas, experience – enthusiasm. So yes,  I’m super excited at the potential and hope you are too.

 

Tomorrow: Community Education Survey, Recognition That Matters

Featured image credit: Stephen Burton

 

 

 


Mozilla Reps Council AMA
Emma on February 03, 2015 08:11 PM

Cross-post of Majken Conner’s invitation to participate in the first Mozilla Reps Council AMA.  Come ask us questions this Thursday!


This Thursday, launching during the Reps call, council will be doing a 24h
AMA. They’ll be using Discourse, so you only need your Persona account, no
need to sign up to Reddit to post. You won’t need to log in to read the AMA.

For those of you that haven’t done an AMA before, AMA stands for “Ask Me
Anything.“, made popular by the SubReddit. It’s a way to get to know someone, usually a way to find out
what it’s like to have a certain job. The AMA is your chance to get to know
the individual council members as people, and also to understand what it’s
like to actually be on council. Silly questions are ok, if you’ve always
wanted to know what Emma’s favorite colour is, now’s your chance to ask!
Remember to be respectful though, don’t ask something that will probably
make someone uncomfortable.

They’ll be keeping track of suggestions and discussions that should be
continued outside of the AMA so that they aren’t lost when the event is
over. Debates over problems with the program or changes to how it should be
run will need more than 24 hours and deserve to be highlighted properly.

The AMA will take place here –
https://discourse.mozilla-community.org/c/reps/council-ama (you’ll be able
to access it on Thursday)

To ask a new question you should start a new topic. Discourse admins will
be on-hand to help split out sub-conversations into new threads.

If you want to ask all of council a question, you can address them by
typing @repscouncil – Discourse editor will substitute this text with their
individual usernames.  You can also use @ to address a single council
member, @emma_irwin will notify Emma that you’re addressing her
specifically.

I don’t believe the entire council will be available at once, but we should
have at least 1 council member available at any time over the full 24h to
make sure responses come quickly.

Please help me build an FAQ by asking any questions you have here –
https://remo.etherpad.mozilla.org/council-AMA-FAQ – and add +1 to any
questions you had that are already listed.

image credit: Ed Schipul


Mozilla Community Education in 2015
Emma on February 03, 2015 12:52 AM

Last year, to research some theories I had about empowering community, I polled numerous open source communities about their experiences as contributors. Some key responses to  “why do you contribute” were:

  • To learn more about a specific technology or project
  • To grow and develop existing skills
  • For challenge and feedback from respected peers.
  • Opportunity to mentor, or be mentored
  • To better learn and understand the philosophy of Open
  • To improve my resume.

The majority of responses identified learning opportunities and mentoring as a key motivators for participation, and (perhaps even more importantly)  continued participation.  So while, yes,  the impact and potential impact of the project is often the vessel we arrive on –  that alone appears unlikely to sustain contribution.   And that’s why I’m so excited that Community Education, and mentorship are core to mobilizing participation goals for 2015.

” At the core of the plan is the assumption that we need to build a virtuous circle between 1) participation that helps our products and programs succeed and2) people getting value from participating in Mozilla.

Mark Surman on Mozilla’s Participation Plan for 2015

I see education as a key connector of value for people and product. For me it’s less like a hypothesis and more like an opportunity to grow what I have, myself, experienced as a contributor and mentor:  that community education and opportunity to learn builds a tenacity and dedication to give back.  Being effective matters to product and person.

” Contributors who received code reviews within 48 hours on their first bug have an exceptionally high rate of returning and contributing.”   -David Eaves survey of Mozilla contributors.

Educational opportunity is also a ‘people-connector’ :  opportunity to give and receive feedback from humans; to know what to what is expected of you,  and what you can expect from others lends traction and speed.   

So what will Community Education look like at Mozilla?  How will it lend to this virtuous circle?   Quite a few ways actually.    I’ll share this in three separate blogs posts this week leading up to our Community Education Working Group Call on Thursday.

Building from our Strength – Remo

Thanks to yet another survey, we have a clear idea idea about what people want to learn, how they want to learn, and some idea of ‘recognition that matters’ looks like.   Most significantly, we have a very successful, strong volunteer leadership platform in the Mozilla Reps, and real examples of community education pushing product success like Mozilla Webmaker and MDN. Remo will be the launchpad for Community Education, and we’ve already started building an education platform, and a base curriculum for mentors.

image credit williamtheaker

The visual of Reps as a launchpad is really important.  It reflects the experience, dedication and power of our community leadership program, our commitment to working collaboratively across the project, and that we intend to pick up speed.

The virtuous circle of participation needs to be visible from space.

Tomorrow:  Functional Area Groups, Pilots/Experiments and Recognition That Matters.

 

banner image credit: Christopher Michel.

 

 


Reps Weekly Call – January 29th 2015
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on January 30, 2015 01:02 PM

Last Thursday we had our weekly call about the Reps program, where we talk about what’s going on in the program and what Reps have been doing during the last week.

Summary
  • January Rep of the month
  • Update on participation plan
  • Recognition that Matters
  • Fosdem 2015.
  • Data Privacy Day.
  • WoMoz & WoMoz Friends Badges.
  • BuddyUp.

Detailed notes

AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next week!


Firefox OS Workshop UPTNM Ludovico Silva
Maedca on January 28, 2015 04:51 PM

El pasado 5 de Diciembre de 2014, estuvimos en la universidad UPTNM Ludovico Silva ubicada en la ciudad de Caripito estado Monagas Venezuela, en donde se realizo el Taller de Firefox OS. El evento inicio con un acto protocolar  a cargo de las autoridades de la Universidad y luego se dio la bienvenida al evento.

La charla estuvo muy amena y cordial con los asistentes los cuales no solo eran de esa casa de estudio ya que tuvimos la asistencia de varios grupos de usuario de Software Libre provenientes de varias latitudes del estado Monagas.

Estuvimos hablando inicialmente sobre la Fundación Mozilla, visión y misión, hicimos una introducción sobre las nuevas características de HTML 5 y CSS 3, hablamos sobre las ventajas que tiene usar Firefox en la parte de seguridad al usuario , mostramos como Firefox protege nuestros datos e identidad.

Pasamos al plato fuerte del taller “Firefox OS”, hicimos una introducción sobre el sistema operativo, las personas quedaron impresionadas de que el sistema fuese hecho en lenguajes Web, luego pasamos a la parte del desarrollo de las aplicaciones donde hablamos sobre diseño adaptable, frameworks que nos ayudan a la tarea del diseño adaptable, hablamos sobre las API’s que están disponibles para implementarlas en nuestras aplicaciones.

Demostramos la manera correcta de hacer un archivo de manifiesto para nuestras aplicaciones, posteriormente con el uso de WebIDE realizamos una pequeña aplicación demo y la subimos a un dispositivo con Firefox OS y en el emulador

Muchas gracias a las autoridades de la Universidad y a toda la comunidad universitaria, sera hasta una próxima oportunidad

 

Galeria


You and your online Privacy : Data Privacy Day.
ankit gadgil (noreply@blogger.com) on January 28, 2015 08:00 AM
Today is Data Privacy Day - January 28, 2015
​ Data Privacy Day (DPD) is an effort to empower people to protect their privacy, control their digital footprint and escalate the protection of privacy and data as everyone’s priority.  Held annually on January 28th, Data Privacy Day aims to increase awareness of privacy and data protection issues among consumers, organizations, and government officials. DPD helps industry, academia, and advocates to highlight consumer privacy efforts.​
twitter: @DataPrivacyDay


What is Data Privacy?Data privacy, also called information privacy, is the aspect of information technology (IT) that deals with the ability an organization or individual has to determine what data in a computer system can be shared with third parties.

Why is data privacy important?
  • Everyone's trying to track what you do on the Web, it's no secret that there's big money to be made in violating your privacy.
  • "One of the most invisible things about the Internet is that there are hordes of robots constantly scrutinizing your aggregate online behavior and determining whether you fit a certain profile.. What determines whether you look like you have something to hide? The robot builders have it in their best interests to keep that secret: otherwise, the people with something to hide would simply start gaming the system. Yet this can also result in a chilling effect: innocent people self-censoring their online behavior based on what they think the robots might be looking for." says Atul Verma (@toolness) in his write up about why privacy matters.
  • Sometimes data privacy can be a juggling act in multinational organizations when it comes to fulfilling the needs of the organization and complying with local privacy laws.
  • Ultimately, data privacy boils down to protecting the rights of the individual to prevent others from stealing their identity, knowing their personal information and much more.

Data Privacy Day: What I can do?
  • Use HTTPS and SSL Whenever Possible:
    • Always use a secure browser. Look for “https” at the beginning of the web address (the “s” stands for “secure”). Access your accounts from a secure location, using computers and networks that you know are safe and secure.
    • Avoid using public networks and always look for the padlock icon in the corner of the browser, signaling that the website is encrypted.
    • The major benefits of a HTTPS certificate are:
      • Customer information, like credit card numbers, is encrypted and cannot be intercepted.
      • Visitors can verify you are a registered business and that you own the domain.
      • Customers are more likely to trust and complete purchases from sites that use HTTPS
    • more..  
  • Create secure Passwords and keep them private:
    • Your passwords should be more than 6 characters and contain letters, numbers and special characters.
    • Mix upper and lower case letters.
    • Don’t use personal information or dictionary words.
    • Hackers use software to enter random dictionary words to help them determine your password.
    • more..
  • Use a Master Password to protect stored logins and passwords :
    • Firefox can save usernames and passwords that you use to access online services, such as banking and email websites.
    • If you share a computer with anyone, it is recommended that you use a master password.
    • more..
  • Don’t Overshare on Social Media:
    • Go through your privacy settings on each site and determine what is a good amount of privacy protection.
    • Consider keeping your profile limited to only certain groups or friends.
    • Never post your personal information such as Social Security number, date of birth or your full name in a public place.
  • Use a search engine that does not track you:
    • A search engine that does not collect or share any of your personal information. 
    • A search engine which has no search history, profile or anything else stored, sold, or given to third parties. Sounds like no search engine like that exists?
    • Yes, it does. Check out : DuckDuckGo
    • read more about this and why you should be concerned : https://duckduckgo.com/privacy
    • more..
       
  • Beware of Scammers:
    • If you receive a suspicious email from a business and you’re not sure if it’s legitimate, close the email, open a new browser, type in their web address and contact them through their customer service.
    • You should know that scammers are real and they will try to steal your personal information if they come across it.
    • Never give out your personal information over the Internet, phone, mail or via text message, unless you know exactly who you are dealing with.
  • Keep yourself safe online. How?
    • Do not reveal personal information inadvertently.
    • Turn on cookie notices in your Web browser, and/or use cookie management software or infomediaries.
    • Don't reveal personal details to strangers or just-met "friends".
    • Keep a "clean" e-mail address.
    • Realize you may be monitored at work, avoid sending highly personal e-mail to mailing lists, and keep sensitive files on your home computer.
    • Beware sites that offer some sort of reward or prize in exchange for your data.
    • Do not reply to spammers, for any reason.
    • Be conscious of Web security.
    • Be conscious of home computer security.
    • Examine privacy policies and seals.
    • Remember that YOU decide what information about yourself to reveal, when, why, and to whom
    • Use encryption!
    • more..  
  • Many of us use public wifi networks where ever we can access them. They are a boon enabling us to be online when we need. But are we paying enough attention on are we protecting ourselves and our data on these networks. Below are some tips about the same:
    • Turn Off Sharing
    • Enable Your Firewall
    • Consider Using a Virtual Private Network
    • Turn Wi-Fi Off When You Aren't Using It
    • Automate Your Public Wi-Fi Security Settings
    • more..
  • Shopping online and using e-commerce sites has become a frequent activity online. Most of us shop online for various reasons. While doing this do we think about our data privacy and security. Below are some basic tips to follow while shopping online next time.
    • Look for the Lock: Never ever, ever buy anything online using your credit card from a site that doesn't have SSL (secure sockets layer) encryption installed—at the very least.
       
    • See if the url of the shopping website begins with https:// While non secure sites and pages begin with http://, secure sites begin with https://
    • Don't Tell All: No online shopping store needs your social security number or your birthday to do business. 
    • Disregard any unsolicited or t suspicious looking pop-ups that appear during your online banking/shopping session.
    • more..
  •  Learn, Teach and share about data privacy:

What we are doing today, join us!
Tips:
Useful links to read through:

Rep of the month: January 2015
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on January 26, 2015 06:22 PM

Irvin Chen has been an inspiring contributor last month and we want to recognize his great work as a Rep.

Irvin has been organizing weekly MozTW Lab and also other events to spread Mozilla in the local community space in Taiwan, such as Spark meetup, d3.js meetup or Wikimedia mozcafe.

He also helped to run an l10n sprint for video subtitle/Mozilla links/SUMO and webmaker on transifex.

Congratulations Irvin for your awesome work!

Don’t forget to congratulate him on Discourse!


Reps Weekly Call – January 22th 2015
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on January 23, 2015 12:10 PM

Last Thursday we had our weekly call about the Reps program, where we talk about what’s going on in the program and what Reps have been doing during the last week.

Summary
  • Dashboard QA and UI.
  • Community Education.
  • Feedback on reporting.
  • Participation plan and Grow meeting.
  • Womoz Badges.

Detailed notes

AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next week!


Pontoon report 2014: Get involved
mathjazz on January 16, 2015 02:12 PM

This is the last in a series of blog posts outlining Pontoon development in 2014. I’ll mostly focus on new features targeting translators. If you’re more interested in developer oriented updates, please have a look at the release notes.

Part 1. User interface
Part 2. Backend
Part 3. Meet our top contributors
Part 4. Make your translations better
Part 5. Get involvedyou are here

In the past years, Pontoon has come a long way from an idea, a prototype, to a working product. As of today, there’s a dozen of Mozilla projects available for localization in Pontoon. If you want to move it even further, there are plenty of ways to do so.

For localizers
Start learning how things work by looking at the new Pontoon homepage, which is also used as a demo project to be translated using Pontoon. Perhaps you can translate it to your mother language. You can also learn more advanced features.

For developers
Making your website or web application localizable with Pontoon is quick and easy. A simple script needs to be added and you are halfway through. Follow implementation instructions for more details.

Take action
Do you have ideas for improvement? Are you a developer? Learn how to get your hands dirty. It has never been easier to set up development environment and start contributing. We’re on GitHub.


Reps Weekly Call – January 15th 2015
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on January 16, 2015 12:30 PM

Last Thursday we had our weekly call about the Reps program, where we talk about what’s going on in the program and what Reps have been doing during the last week.

Summary
  • Data Privacy Day.
  • Hello Campaign.
  • Womoz Update.
  • Event metrics challenges update.
  • Mozlandia videos.
  • How we can improve reports to be more easy?
  • Reps and schools.

Detailed notes

AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next week!


Pontoon report 2014: Make your translations better
mathjazz on January 14, 2015 10:03 AM

This post is part of a series of blog posts outlining Pontoon development in 2014. I’ll mostly focus on new features targeting translators. If you’re more interested in developer oriented updates, please have a look at the release notes.

Part 1. User interface
Part 2. Backend
Part 3. Meet our top contributors
Part 4. Make your translations betteryou are here
Part 5. Get involved

Some new features have been added to Pontoon, some older tools have been improved, all helping translators be more efficient and make translations more consistent, more accurate and simply better.

History
History tab displays previously suggested translations, including submissions from other users. Privileged translators can pick approved translation or delete the ones they find inappropriate.

Machinery
The next tab provides automated suggestions from several sources: Pontoon translation memory, Transvision (Mozilla), amagama (open source projects), Microsoft Terminology and machine translation by Bing Translator. Using machinery will make your translations more consistent.

Quality checks
Pontoon reviews every submitted translation by running Translate Toolkit pofilter tests that check for several issues that can affect the quality of your translations. Those checks are locale specific and can be turned off by translator.

Placeables
Some pieces of strings are not supposed to be translated. Think HTML markup or variables for example. Pontoon colorizes those pieces (called placeables) and allows you to easily insert them into your translation by clicking on them.

Get involved
Are you a developer, interested in Pontoon? Learn how to get your hands dirty.


Teaching Contribution
Emma on January 12, 2015 11:31 PM

There are a lot of wonderful challenges in open source: opportunities to learn, to make a difference and to impact the world in a positive way.  There are good difficulties learning in open source: hard problems we need to solve-for, but usually we’re OK with that- we’re problem solvers, fixers, inventors, builders… we invest in challenge for causes we care about.

But for technical contributors, the potential impact of an individual person weighs heavily on their ability to survive on-boarding. The not-so-good difficulty:  Navigating wikis, understanding communication tools, getting  a local environment up & running – understanding how to ask for help; how to find tasks that match interests + skillset.  It’s can be too hard – too discouraging, and so drop-off occurs. But when you are successful :  pride, accomplishment, impact,  community, repeat.

Knowing this is why I’m such a fan of Lukas Blakk’s Ascend Project, and  Open Hatch Comes to Campus, an initiative of Open Hatch.  OHCTC brings curriculum covering the practical skills students need to contribute to open source projects to university campuses as  1-day mentor-lead events. If you think students are already learning about open source participation in higher education, you would (mostly) be wrong.

I ran an Open Hatch Comes to Campus event back in October, focused on contributing to the Webmaker Code base.  That experience inspired me to create this online course focused on the tools & social norms of contributing, which lead me to do a bit more thinking about how curriculum can be developed for project-specific on-boarding.  I’m thinking a LOT about this actually.

The results of my online and offline events were super-encouraging, and pointed out just how important it is to create deliberate ‘learning by doing’ opportunities around project on-boarding.  ‘Ask us in IRC’  is not a direction people necessarily understand and the problem is magnified: ‘How do get help for asking for help in IRC ‘?  And this is true for experienced engineers as well.

This year I hope to grow this experiment a bit more, through deliberately themed ‘Mozilla contribution + Open Hatch . To that end, I spent a bit of time scheming with Shauna of Open Hatch today as to what that could look like.  We decided that perhaps:  some requests from Universities for events could be run by Reps, or on the flip side, Reps would have support of OHCTC for outreach in their region.  Learning opportunities though focused on events, could also be provided online, or  as self-study

Mozilla Reps can run events (very well) and with curriculum designed specifically for on-boarding Mozilla projects we think there’s huge potential. And I’ll stop here to acknowledge all of those people who might be skeptical about growing contributors via learning events like this.  We talked about that as well, more soon on some themes that emerged.

As a side-note, it’s also a goal of mine to help Reps find better ways to work with other open project partners (vrs taking on all aspects of events alone), and so feeling optimistic the win can cover several needs.

For the next little while Shauna and I, mapped out some action items:

  • Create curriculum focused on one coding & one non-coding Mozilla activity.  Complimented by Open Hatch curriculum (or my own online version) for getting started.
  • Introduce the idea to Reps / Feedback.
  • Run one online version of this curriculum (work out the bugs)
  • Run one USA/North America event (Pilot)
  • Run one European or Asian event (Pilot)

I know Open Hatch has additional goals  outside of universities (libraries for example), and to expand beyond the 1-time workshop, which coincidentally aligns with some of the things Webmaker Code Clubs are hoping to do.  I feel this will be a fantastic year for partnering with other open projects like Open Hatch.  Excited for the potential and…will keep you updated.  If you are interested in helping – I’ll provide a bit more info on that soon as well.

Photo credit:   Clay Shonkwilder

 

 

 

 


Pontoon report 2014: Meet our top contributors
mathjazz on January 12, 2015 10:50 AM

This post is part of a series of blog posts outlining Pontoon development in 2014. I’ll mostly focus on new features targeting translators. If you’re more interested in developer oriented updates, please have a look at the release notes.

Part 1. User interface
Part 2. Backend
Part 3. Meet our top contributorsyou are here
Part 4. Make your translations better
Part 5. Get involved

Until recently, Pontoon only supported basic statistics, available during project translation. It was impossible to track overall project progress, check locale status or see the most active localizers. This is no longer the case.

Project Overview
You can list all projects available for translation within Pontoon. For each of them, information on the number of total strings is available, as well as translation progress.

Project and locale page
Additionally, a list of all locales enabled for specific project is available by clicking on it in the project overview page. If your locale is not on the list, Pontoon allows you to request it. In a similar fashion, you can track locale progress.

Top contributors
Localization at Mozilla is made possible by army of awesome volunteers. Without their help, the web and Mozilla would not be what it is today. Check out the most active contributors on Pontoon.

User pages
You can check some basic information for each contributor, including stats and timeline of his work. Meet Ayan, top Pontoon contributor!

Get involved
Are you a developer, interested in Pontoon? Learn how to get your hands dirty.


Reps Weekly Call – January 8th 2015
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on January 09, 2015 01:01 PM

Last Thursday we had our first weekly call about the Reps program of the year, where we talk about what’s going on in the program and what Reps have been doing during the last week.

Summary
  • Community Education Survey .
  • Rep communication channels.
  • Rep of the month.
  • Mozilla Reps in 2014.
  • Reminder to test Reps Portal.

Detailed notes

AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next week!


Pontoon report 2014: Backend
mathjazz on January 09, 2015 09:37 AM

This post is part of a series of blog posts outlining Pontoon development in 2014. I’ll mostly focus on new features targeting translators. If you’re more interested in developer oriented updates, please have a look at the release notes.

Part 1. User interface
Part 2. Backendyou are here
Part 3. Meet our top contributors
Part 4. Make your translations better
Part 5. Get involved

In the first part we focused on frontend. Let’s look at the backend changes now.

Extended revision control system support
All projects we localize at Mozilla store translations using revision control systems, namely Git, Mercurial and Subversion. All of them are now supported in Pontoon. Additionally, Transifex can be used as data store.

Automated synchronization with repositories
Committing to and updating from repositores is counterintuitive. Most translators don’t event understand the concept of revision control. These task are now performed automatically in the background every full hour. Conflicts are resolved silently by allowing upstream to win.

New localization formats
All localization file formats used at Mozilla are supported (e.g. .po, .lang, .dtd. and .properties). You can also use a mix of different formats within your project and they will still work with Pontoon.

Plural forms
If format supports different plural forms, Pontoon will detect that and allow saving translations in all forms available for the locale. Other format-specific features such as fuzzy strings in .po files are also available.


Numbers in green are used as an example number that will replace the variable.

Get involved
Are you a developer, interested in Pontoon? Learn how to get your hands dirty.


Pontoon report 2014: User interface
mathjazz on January 07, 2015 10:59 PM

This post marks the beginning of a series of blog posts outlining Pontoon development in 2014. I’ll mostly focus on new features targeting translators. If you’re more interested in developer oriented updates, please have a look at the release notes.

Part 1. User interfaceyou are here
Part 2. Backend
Part 3. Meet our top contributors
Part 4. Make your translations better
Part 5. Get involved

The old UI for out-of-context translation didn’t scale. It worked for basic presentation of original strings and translation area, but once we started adding more and more tools like translation memory, quality checks or plural forms, we simply ran out of space. So we started from scratch and came up with something completely different.

Flat Design
We went flat. Not because everyone else did, but because it’s neutral. And we needed neutral to contrast various website designs when they are being translated within Pontoon. For the very same reason Pontoon uses dark color scheme since day one.

Sidebar is the new bottom panel
Out-of-context mode has moved to the sidebar to take advantage of widescreen monitors. It features two exchanging panels, one to display strings and the other to translate. This layout gives us much more real estate for adding new capabilities.

Flexibility
Sidebar is draggable. When it becomes wide enough, both panels are displayed at the same time, side by side. This also happens if in-context translation mode (website) is not available, in which case fullwidth sidebar is always open.

Keyboard shortcuts
Basic support for navigating menus with arrow keys, confirming with Enter or closing with Esc was always available. From now on, saving translations, inserting suggestions, moving among strings and such are also accessible through keyboard.

Get involved
Are you a developer, interested in Pontoon? Learn how to get your hands dirty.


Rep of the month: December 2014
Emma Irwin on January 07, 2015 12:34 PM

The best of the Reps program for December is reflected in the accomplishments and leadership of Santosh Viswanatham.

Santosh  is a super active Mozilla Rep from Telangana Region, India. He has been the backbone of the Firefox OS contributions and community activities around his region for the past 18 months. Starting his  journey as an FSA, he now is the Regional Ambassador Lead of FSA Program in India.

Developing his First Firefox OS app, he shared the experience in a blogpost which got published in the FSA Newsletter. Thus inspiring him further to be a part of Mozilla community.

Thank you Santosh for your amazing work!

Don’t forget to congratulate him on Discourse!


Hired by Phoxygen; Working full-time on Firefox OS
nefzaoui on December 31, 2014 10:39 PM

tldr; Hired by Phoxygen to work on Firefox OS and implement RTL UIs.

Firefox OS Settings – Right-To-Left UI

I started contributing to the Mozilla project in 2012, August it was when I joined my home-country community, Mozilla Tunisia. One of the most important reasons I joined was how much was I interested in Boot2Gecko project or what we call now Firefox OS. Ever since, I’ve been a big fan of it and I wanted it so bad in my country and the whole region of Middle East and North Africa that I started contributing to the code, and sending patches that fix how the Right-To-Left User Interfaces looked like with one simple goal: The sooner it’s done, the sooner it lands in the region.

And wow, time really flies. With me finishing my studies at the Higher Institute of Technological Studies, I’m wrapping up 2014 with a new job; Basically what I have been doing for the past couple of years turns into a post-graduation career as I’m kicking off working with Phoxygen, a French company that implements OEMs requirements, features and solutions into Firefox OS where my main and primary task is to implement RTL UIs into the operating system.

So yeah, looking forward to see what 2015 has in store for Firefox OS, Phoxygen and me


Mozilla Reps in 2014
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on December 30, 2014 11:29 AM

2014 has been an amazing year for the Mozilla Reps program, full of work, passion and awesome stories.

More than 450 Reps have been working hard to push the Mozilla mission and values around 90 countries in the world.

One of the main tools are events. This year Reps organized or attended more than 1400 events in 97 different countries.

Impressed? Well, let me tell you that just on events organized directly by Reps we reached more than 134 000 attendees!

And the most popular event categories this year? Firefox OS, Students and Webmaker.

Reps work has been crucial to move Mozilla goals this year. Reps have been there at FOSDEM, MWC, Mozfest and many other big events where Mozilla took a key role.

Also, Reps have been in charge of most Firefox OS Launches in 15 new countries (Chile, India, Bangladesh, El Salvador, Panamá, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Macedonia, Czech Republic , France, Australia, Costa Rica, Philippines, Russia and Japan) and also the Firefox 10th anniversary events around the world.

This year also there has been a lot of changes and challenges in the program, some of them:

  • We have on boarded a lot of new mentors (currently 56).
  • Started the Reps Weekly Calls (where you are invited each Thursday).
  • Created this blog with the latest program announcements.
  • Opened new discussion forums.
  • Had an amazing and productive ReMo Camp in Berlin.
  • Invested more in accountability, participation, leadership and education.

What was your best moment as Rep in 2014?

Where do you want the program to go next year?

Thanks

We don’t want to end the year without saying THANKS to everyone that makes the Reps program possible, specially our beloved mentors, Council and stunning Reps of the month.

Do you want to follow what Reps are doing? Check our portal, twitter, Facebook page, air mozilla channel and discussion forums.


Reps Weekly Call – December 18th 2014
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on December 19, 2014 11:44 AM

Last Thursday we had our regular weekly call about the Reps program, where we talk about what’s going on in the program and what Reps have been doing during the last week.

Summary
  • Privacy Day & Hello Plan.
  • End of the year! What should we do?
  • Mozlandia videos.

Note: Due holiday dates, next weekly call will be January 8.

Detailed notes

AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next year!


Graduation and stuff
nefzaoui on December 16, 2014 05:31 PM

So finally my studies path is almost crossing another milestone, graduating from Higher Institute of Technological Studies, in which I study Computer Science; to be exact Web Development. This is the part after which I start thinking about my job, carrier path and so on (or just study more, dunno what future has in store for me), I know, I look too young huh.. Yeah I’m kinda waiting for the day I don’t look like I’m 12 years old anymore. Anyway, I just gotta say to my Mozilla friends, colleagues and mentors and anyone who might need me or need a little of my help that I’m not gonna be available all the time for the coming month, at least to mid/end January 2015, sorry for the inconvenience.
I will do my very best to be there whenever my contributions are needed, but I’ll be less active (and you probably have noticed that already). So, wish me luck :))


#mozlove for Nigel Babu
Emma on December 15, 2014 06:32 PM

Two weeks ago some 1000+ Mozillians gathered in Portland for a workweek.  Attendance was, as usual, from all over the world – staff  and volunteers all working really hard, together,  to visualize 2015 – and in the evenings we met at various restaurants all over town to unwind and socialize.  It was on one of these nights at the Deschutes Brewery , I met and was inspired by Nigel Babu and the story of Mozilla Sheriffs.  ‘Sheriffing’ is not just the coolest contributor title – but a truly amazing collaboration of people across the world working to ensure the Firefox & B2G trees build correctly each night.  Across the continent – there is always Sheriff watching.

Nigel made me aware that even for the most impactful contributors – recognition is sometimes rare, or  is limited to specific areas of the project – rarely does that news bubble up.  I would say that most of us don’t turn up expecting recognition – but it is nice to feel appreciated, and valued. I’m imagining a 2015 where recognition is something we all practice.

To that end, I am writing this blog post, an interview to recognize Nigel but also to start a challenge to others in the community – to write about, tweet about – ‘make some noise in some way’ about a community member (staff or volunteer) making impact on Mozilla’s mission, or someone who has inspired you personally.   Tag it with #mozlove , and nominate someone else. I am nominating       to do the same.

Let’s end 2015 with love-stories about community members like Nigel.


Nigel, can you tell me a bit about yourself  ?

I live in Delhi, India (just recently moved from Bangalore) and I work as a Senior Systems Administrator at Open Knowledge. I’ve been an open source contributor for several years, starting by contributing to Ubuntu in 2009. Since then, I’ve been active in the open source world and it’s now part of my day job.

I learned about a very cool contributor title in Mozilla called ‘Sheriff’s’ and that you are one!  Can you tell me more about this role, and what is it that inspired you to contribute?

Every time someone commits code to Firefox or B2G, there’s an array of builds and tests kicked off on various platforms. Sometimes, these tests take hours to run and the developer may not be aware that they broke something. As a sheriff, we watch the trees to ensure that our tests and builds don’t break. The Sheriffs team also helps folks land their patch onto repository if, for whatever reason, they do not want to land it themselves.

The inspiration for contributing to Sheriffs team is entirely incidental. At the summit in Santa Clara last year, I was sitting in the lobby next to Wes Kocher. We started having a conversation and he invited me to his talk later that day. When I attended the talk, I realized I knew Ed Morely from the London office. During the talk, Ed, Ryan, and Wes convinced me I could help. There was a bit of a gap in coverage between Wes in the US West Coast and Carsten, in Germany and I was in a perfect timezone to help.

The team got me the access I need to start marking failures as intermittent and wrote documentation from the conversations and questions I raised. Over the months, I’ve made plenty of mistakes and I’ve also gotten more confidence in fixing issues. There’s been a day when I’ve had to call up Nick Thomas in New Zealand followed by Chris Cooper in Toronto because there was an infrastructure issue needing all trees to be closed.

How long have you been contributing to Mozilla – Is Sheriffing where you started contributing to Mozilla, or was there a journey here?

I’ve been contributing to Mozilla since 2011. I started my contributions by helping with developing input.mozilla.org. The codebase has changed drastically since then and I’ve blogged about my initial story already.

I also learned from our conversation, that Sherriffing takes global cooperation, for timezones – can you tell me a bit more about that?

Sheriffing is handed over from shift to shift throughout the week. I watch the tree in the mornings in my timezone (almost all the time with Phil for company). Around afternoon, Carsten, takes over from me. After him, it’s Ryan’s turn, and finally Wes. After Wes, it’s a mix of Phil and I watching the tree again.

What feels most rewarding about contributing to Mozilla?  I suppose what I’m wondering is – what sustains your involvement – keeps you involved?

Sheriffing has it’s own feedback. Every day as we do backouts and keep the tree green, I know that while it temporarily disrupts work, in the long run, it’s helping developers merge their code into Firefox sooner without issues

 

Thanks for all you do Nigel!

 

 

 

 

 


Reps Weekly Call – December 11st 2014
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on December 12, 2014 01:06 PM

Last Thursday we had our regular weekly call about the Reps program, where we talk about what’s going on in the program and what Reps have been doing during the last week.

Summary
  • FOSDEM update.
  • Portland Work Week.
  • ReMo/Mozillians websites testing.
  • End of year receipts campaign.
  • Remo challenges.
  • Stumbling in a box events.
  • Reps Monthly newsletter.

Detailed notes

AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next week!


Mozilla Portland Workweek
birajkarmakar on December 10, 2014 10:04 PM

Last week, I was in Portland, USA for attending the Mozilla Coincidental Workweek aka #mozlandia . This was great event with thousand of Mozilla staffs and a hundred Mozilla volunteers. Now I am going to share what was my role there.

Hello portland ……….

At the very first day, I went to portland art museum, where over 800 people were gathering for breakfast. I met with many amazing people whom I know them by IRC. But that day, it was my great chance to meet personally. Then headed to attend opening addresses of Mitchel Baker, Mark Surman, Chris Beard, David Slater and many of them.

Click to view slideshow.

Then I joined the MDN team meeting. It was great that I saw many faces of MDN people there. Nice to meet them also. Then started brainstorming the ideas with them. That day I had my first meeting with FSA E-Board meeting with members. This was also great.

Next day we started with our December Office Hour . That day was cool for me. But I am excited for. Many FSA around the globe actually attended this and we have given the answers for their questions. Then headed to join the MDN team with different meetings. After lunch I again joined FSA hacksession day1 meeting with discussion of lots for new upcoming features for FSA and all. If you have missed then check it out December Office Hour .

Next day, again started with MDN learn area meeting. As a learn area mentor, I had given my thoughts how we can go ahead this project and all. Then followed with FSA hacksession day2.

Last day, I joined with L10n team meetings. Then I was at the Final meeting for FSA e-board. That day great foe me. Where We documented all our 2015 planning, how we can empower this program and all.  After all, in every day I had tight schedule of several meetings .

Last night was awesome experience of “MACKLEMORE AND RYAN LEWIS ” live performance ‪of #‎rapper and #‎DJ‬ ‪#AmericanHipHop‬ duo in Portland USA. Thanks mozilla for arranging this.

Click to view slideshow.

 

Some awesome moments for me……

1. First event where I got a chance to meet with awesome mozillians

2. Dancing with Mozillizns

3. MACKLEMORE AND RYAN LEWIS  live performance

4. First USA trip

5. Visiting Mozila Portland office

6. Roaming around Portland with mozillians

Some more pics …..

Click to view slideshow.

This whole event was awesome place for me where I learnt a lot and I was the in community discussion ideas, for which I am responsible to execute those in 2015.

Some pictures credit goes to my fellow mozillian friends.

Great event indeed for me :P :D :) :D

 


Filed under: mozilla event Tagged: biraj, biraj karmakar, birajkarmakar, Firefox, FSA, mozilla, mozlandia, pdx, Portland, remo

Say Hello with Firefox Hello :)
Gauthamraj (noreply@blogger.com) on December 10, 2014 09:52 AM

Say Hello with Firefox Hello :)

It's been quite long since I wrote something *interesting* here. But, it is worth a wait ! Yeah, I am going to write about " Firefox Hello " - a new feature that is landed on Firefox Beta recently. You heard it right - Firefox Hello I am sure you must be wondering, what Firefox Hello is... Firefox Hello is based on Mozilla's Web RTC that let's you to have a video and audio chat inside the Firefox browser with out the need of installing any addons or additional softwares. Cool, right ?

With Firefox Hello, you can start having a video call immediately from your browser. All you need is to share the generated link to the person with whom you want to talk.... No more headaches of installing additional software and creating/registering new accounts.

Woohooo...Tell me how can I say Hello with Firefox Hello ;)

I am sure you are excited and eager to try out Firefox Hello !! Before you can start saying Hello's, you need to get the Firefox Beta version. Latest Firefox Beta version can be downloaded from here . Get it and install it on your computer.

Note : Firefox (stable) and Firefox Beta are different so Beta version will not replace the Firefox (if you already one installed on your machine) but installs as a separate application.

You're all set for a Hello !!!

When you have the Firefox Beta installed on your machine. You're all set :) Open Firefox Beta, don't get confused if it resembles like Firefox (of, course it will look alike). But, in Firefox Beta you must be able to see a chat box icon on right side of toolbar at the top. That's Firefox Hello ;)

If you can't see, click the menu icon (four lines icon) at top right and then click on customize. There you should see Firefox Hello (chat box icon). Drag and drop it to the toolbar.

Click the icon, you will get a hanging window with a unique link generated for you. Share this link to the person with who you wish to say Hello ( video chat ) by Firefox Hello ! When the other person opens the link in "Firefox Beta". Window will popup at the bottom of the browser and start the video call ( or Audio call if no cam ).

Note : Firefox Hello requires both the parties involved in the call to run Firefox Beta !

Advantages
1. Video and Audio chat inside the browser
2. No additional addons / software required
3. No registration required

That's it ! yeah..simple and easy right ?

Now you know everything needed to say Hello with Firefox Hello :) Let Hello's begin...! I hope you agree "Firefox Hello" a good reason to make a switch to Firefox browser ( if you aren't using it ). If you have any questions/comments/feedbacks let me know :)

Regards,

Gautham

P.S - Firefox Hello will land on regular Firefox (stable) in next few months. Until then, enjoy Firefox Hello in Firefox Beta !!


Rep of the month: November 2014
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on December 07, 2014 12:31 PM

Again, it’s that time of the month where we show gratitude to the best of the Reps program.

Flore Allemandou is one of the oldest mozillians around, being a Mozilla Rep for a long time too. In the last months she took lead of the WoMoz project coordinating our activities in this area. She also organized our presence at the Adacamp editions in Berlin and Bangalore.

At the MozFest she was one of the most active Reps around, helping out by leading sessions from community Building and diversity to even flash around 80 Flame devices. As part of the Mobilizers in France she organized several event in Lyon and Paris helping with our Firefox OS Launch there.

As this wasn’t enough, she organized Mozilla’s presence at Open World forum and Code of war. Locasprint was also another of the last months events together with some great photos for the Firefox 10 Celebration.

Thank you Flore for your amazing work!

Don’t forget to congratulate her on Discourse!


Radical Participation – Scaling the Human Network
Emma on December 02, 2014 09:50 PM

Co-written with Larissa Shapiro

At Mozilla we’re always thinking about how to improve our products, how to continue a legacy of innovation and quality while shipping often. That said, we can’t talk about Mozilla’s history, or future without acknowledging the critical role of our global volunteer community in our success, and of it’s importance to our future. Software is made by people, and community is made both by and of people.

This year’s learnings around the challenges of contributor growth and retention, come with a recognition that we have two very different tracks of ‘shipping Mozilla': How we ship product, and how we grow community are distinct, and there is no doubt that the betterment of both lies in the scaling a human network.

Designing for participation is really about designing for people , it’s about building an ecosystem of empowerment. We’re learning that our most successful pathways reflect diversity of community background, skill-set, available time and motivation.

Teaching

The aha-moment of open source contribution is when someone feels successful in ‘doing a thing’. Be it connecting to a chat room with an IRC tool, or building a local copy of Webmaker.org, it’s that first success that drives the next. These successes need to happen long before a first pull request, even before taking a ‘mentored bug’. We need to get better at helping people reach their first ‘Mozilla moment’, through deliberate and predictable teaching and learning ‘by doing’ opportunities. We’ve already started doing this in person with Open Hatch events and curriculum,  but scaling this means building online opportunities.

We need to provide ongoing, predictable, transparent and inclusive educational opportunities for volunteer community and product teams working with volunteers

Mentoring

Mentoring is core to the success of our community. Staff AND volunteers, go farther when someone is there to encourage their success, to answer their questions and to help strategize for the future. The Mozilla Reps program is a great example of how we can scale participation through thoughtful and ongoing mentorship .

The Mozilla Guides project is proving that by offering a searchable, scale-able, organized resource for brand new Mozillians who need encouragement, coaching, and mentors, to take their first steps and find the projects they want to make an impact on .

Mentoring is done well already in some places at Mozilla. The Reps program has done an incredible job of building a network of mentors, and mentoring is at the core of its success. We need to make mentors and mentoring easily available and usefully structured for all Mozillians at all levels of skill and participation.

Designing Participation Tracks

Designing participation for a college graduate is much different than designing for an experienced C# engineer interested in transitioning strong technical skills to open source ecosystem. Making pathways as simple as possible for the episodic volunteers , is as important as providing long-term opportunities. What other types of participation should we be considering? Is Mozilla contribution accessible for those with disabilities? How do we plug one into the other?

What does it look like to show up as an organized group effort? How do schools and companies interested in lending skills to a project on an single, or ongoing basis get involved?

We suggest that we framing Mozilla contribution as an opportunity for individuals and organized groups. Corporations can lend time and technical talent for skill & team building , while universities across the world can their better help students for the job market through the opportunity that is – contributing to Mozilla. Mozilla in kind, can define on-ramps for organizations (corporations, universities, other open source projects, and more) to be able to easily find opportunities and make an impact – and develop mutual benefit.

A Community Building Community

We’ve been saying that community building is everyone’s job at Mozilla, but what we haven’t explicitly said – is that we’re building a community around ‘community building in Mozilla’. This means, we need to get better at sharing resources across the project. We need improved communication mechanisms to help avoid duplication of efforts. We need to be more deliberate about reaching out with what we’ve learned.

Designing for humans ensures that those who want to go fast (move fast and break things, if you will) – can, and those who want to be more deliberate in their process will get there too. Our collective speed of innovation, development, and impact will increase when we are deliberate about mentorship, teaching and growing a connected community of community designers – as core tenets of participation design, human infrastructure, and volunteer empowerment at Mozilla.

Larissa and I would love your feedback on these thoughts around radical participation at Mozilla.


Reps Weekly Call – November 27th 2014
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on November 28, 2014 01:05 PM

Last Thursday we had our regular weekly call about the Reps program, where we talk about what’s going on in the program and what Reps have been doing during the last week.

Summary
  • End of the year – Metrics and Receipts.
  • Reminder: Vouch and vouched on Mozillians.
  • Community PR survey.
  • AdaCamp.

Detailed notes

AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next week!


Firefox OS App Day Frankfurt – 22.11.2014
Michael Kohler on November 25, 2014 08:58 PM

On the 22nd of November we met in Frankfurt am Main (Germany) to have a Firefox OS App Day. This is an event where we have talks in the morning to explain Firefox OS and Web APIs and then we hack for the rest of the day creating amazing apps for Firefox OS (and the open web).

Preparation

I asked Jan Bambach if he wanted to help out to organize a Firefox OS App Day. He gladly accepted even though he had some stress in school since he has to write exams. After figuring out a date, we started to plan the event. We started with the agenda.

09:00 – 09:15 Welcome / Introduction to Mozilla

09:15 – 09:45 “What is Firefox OS?”

09:45 – 10:15 “How do I develop for Firefox OS?”

10:15 – 10:30 Break

10:30 – 12:30 Hacking your own Firefox OS app

12:30 – 13:30 Lunch Break

13:30 – 17:15 Hacking your own Firefox OS app

17:15 – 17:30 “Firefox Marketplace – How to submit an app”

17:30 – 18:15 App presentations

 

We did a lot of advertisement for the event, but unfortunately that didn’t turn out as we expected. We only heard about another event taking place the same day a few days before the event. This was too late to reschedule. Next time we’ll check better and avoid having an event at the same day as a big Barcamp going on. I’m sure that we’d have more participants if it was on another day. Additionally we found out that asking Universities to advertise it to their students doesn’t scale as well as it should. We didn’t get any feedback from them.

 

App Day

On Saturday we were 9 persons. We expected to have 25 persons, but I’m going to explain to you why this is actually not as bad as it sounds.

After a talk about the Mozilla community and Firefox OS from me, Colin talked about Web APIs and showed some examples. This was very interesting to all the participants since most of them were native App developers and not web developers. There were some “I can do X on Android, is that possible with Firefox OS too?”.

Since we could support every developer without having a “question queue”, the overall turnout of the apps was a lot more advanced than at other App days with more people where we sometimes had multiple people waiting for an answer to a question. This was also the first time where we had two Marketplace submissions with a fully functional app.

Apps created:

  • Wasserwaage - an app to measure if something is even
  • Clownfish – a game where you need to swim around fishes and need to avoid them  (still awaiting review in the Marketplace, make sure to check it out once it’s reviewed!)
  • A game where you need to clear your side of the table of all balls so that the other person has all the balls (not yet pushed to the Marketplace, but already a very exciting game even though there are no points yet)
  • A quiz app where you need to find out the capital or country by identifying the flag of the country (this was already developed before, but he did a lot of fixes and adapted it to Firefox OS)
  • An app to upload Creative Commons pictures to the Wikimedia Commons page. Unfortunately we had a problem with the Wikimedia API and couldn’t finish the app. He promised to finish it once it’s possible. The Wikimedia Commons API doesn’t send a CORS header, so systemXHR doesn’t work if cookies are sent.

At the end we showed how to upload an App to the Marketplace. Let’s hope that everybody else uploads their app too once it has a better state and is not a prototype :)

Thanks to everybody who attended, great event!

 

Lessons learned

  • Check better for “competing” events during the event days
  • Re-check location (fortunately this wasn’t a problem even though the reservation wasn’t confirmed)
  • Smaller groups are better since you can support the developers way better than in a large group
  • We should advertise the Flame better, there is a lot of interest!

 



Codemotion: becoming a reference
FrancJP on November 25, 2014 02:52 PM

Over the last weekend (November 21st and 22nd), it took place the third edition of Codemotion in Madrid. An event that aims to be a reference for developers events in Madrid, and in Spain specifically. While the format is kinda “imported” from Italy, we can surely say that it has its own place, and it becomes a reference on technological events nowadays.

That implies that is interesting to participate, be there and be part of it. Although this year, they tried to open the participation scope, I think that for next year, it would be ideal to keep the spirit from the first edition. Focus only on development, and bring more people from outside so they can share their experience, or talk about their work. In any case, I would suggest to include an intermedium level in the talks, since the program has begginer talks (even though, I can’t say which kind of basic skills they thought), or advanced. If your audience has already a good knowledge, you can have the risk of setting the bar too high.

Regarding our community, we have decided the participation since they’ve invited us to the first event planning. That meeting was more intended to bring together all the communities, and have some feedback previous to the actual planning of the event. And I think it went very well. Communities had the opportunity to present in some talks at the event, so people can know that behind those projects, there is a group of people fighting for moving that forward, or at least to let them know that there is passionate people behind those projects.

In this opportunity, we had 2 talks and a booth, where people could see and test some Firefox OS devices, get stickers, buttons, and other surprises. For this time we’d thought that a good way to connect with the audience would be having a contest to upload their apps to the marketplace, so they could have the chance to win a Firefox T-shirt. In one of the talks we proposed this idea: create an app from a webpage already made. With a few simple steps, create an app, with a manifest included.

Along the event, around 5 to 7 people came by and won a Firefox T-shirt, only for uploading their web to the marketplace (to name a few: a productivity timer, and a local newspaper). Only this proved the power of the web, that allows to easily create an app for Firefox OS.

All in all, we connect with the people thanks to that idea, we also met with old friends, and we’ve enjoyed an event that is creating its own space in the tech events ambience. We hope that in its next edition they maintain the level, so we can definitely say that Codemotion is a reference in Spain.


FUEL GILT 2014 conference
birajkarmakar on November 24, 2014 09:15 PM

Today I am going to share about “FUEL GILT  2014 , November 14-15,
Pune, India , the largest FOSS event in India for language technology.

Last two week ago, I attended this conference and this was great event. Also in last year I attended “FUEL GILT 2013” as a participant but this time I participated as Speaker of  one topic and as Mozilla’s presence organizer.  Basically The organizers of FUEL GILT Conference were Red Hat and C-DAC GIST and supported by mozilla in this year.

Let me tell a brief what FUEL is. Before that we need to know some true facts. We loves consistency,  The consistency of any product can only be achieved by standardization of its process and components . We always would like to follow this in Software localization . So for that standardization of commonly used terms in software localization, FUEL community has taken this initiative. But what is “FUEL GILT” —  This is annual gathering for all about language technology world, all about GILT industry – G11N, I18N, L10N, and translation world and this event also shows us the pain and conflicts of different cultures and languages.

Let’s dig more into it ….

Very first day, the event was started at sharp 2.30 pm with registration.Then Rajesh Ranjan , the main person behind this Fuel, gave the Welcome Address . FUEL GILT Conference 2014 was inaugurated by Dr Vijay Bhatkar, Professor Arun Nigavekar, Professor K P Mohanan, Raiomond Doctor . Also Mr. Mahesh Kulakarni was there from C-DAC Gist. They were all key note speakers. Everyone of them is  one of the most highly profiled person in india. Then Ankitkumar Patel, Chandrakant Dhutadmal started with Mission of Fuel. This was exciting to learn what Fuel gained in last year and what will in next year. Next session given by Ravikant on FUEL for Film: Learning from History. In his presentation , he used some panoramic sentences from hindi old film which is really really very pleasant and awesome.  Then we jumped on dinner with delicious food items.

Click to view slideshow.

Next day, we had two several tracks one was talk and another workshop. Started with “Why globalization? – The world wide picture” by Pravin Satpute . Then it was run by several talks. Besides workshop was going on also. There was basically 6 workshops. I had one workshop on ” Localization of Firefox Marketplace Apps / WebApps ” . My presenation also has been hosted here .

Click to view slideshow.

after all talks and workshops done, Open House was started. It was great discussion.

In both days some group pics were taken and swags were distributed among the participants.

Click to view slideshow.

Then Chandrakant  ended  this conference with vote of thanks.

As  a part of this fuel community I have learnt so many things and will learn in future also.

At last. I would like to thank here Rajesh, Chandrakant and Ankit for supporting activities around Mozilla in this conference. Also I would like to thanks Ani for controlling this event periodically.

For photos special thanks goes to Krishnababu. More photos here.

I have taken some photos here.

After reading my blog, I hope you like it.

Bye. have a great time.


Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: biraj, biraj karmakar, birajkarmakar, conference, FirefoxOSappl10n, fuelgilt, fuelgilt2014, mozilla, remo, Software localization

Being a Mozilla Rep Mentor – Training & SOP Updates
Emma on November 22, 2014 03:57 AM

This post has been a long-time coming, as there are important changes to the Reps Mentorship program SOP and process as a result of RemoCamp Berlin.

A quick background!  I believe very, very much in the power of mentorship in general, and in Reps specifically I know that in mentorship lies the potential to unlock the possibilities of all Reps can achieve together if we value the opportunity of empowering each other.  That said, this role to-date, has been loosely implemented as more of a administrative role – and that’s about to change.

In Berlin we ran a carousel for Rep Mentors, where my station was labelled ‘Mentorship’.  I asked each rotation to speak to their best experiences of mentoring and being mentored through storytelling. I love storytelling in facilitation – not only as a way for people to share their experiences, but as an opportunity for story-teller and listener alike to build a collective vision for the future.

As people shared their experiences, we identified and documented themes.  I also asked everyone to share a non-positive/learning experience about the same, which in the end told us a lot about what people really valued in the mentorship experience .  Everyone was different, but core  attributes emerged:  communication, empowerment, listening, feedback and respect.

Based on the feedback, I have updated the Mozilla Mentor SOP , and added a Mentor Training SOP.  BOTH are ready for feedback, but if you’re not dedicated to reading every line in the wiki here are the important highlights.

Mozilla Reps Mentor SOP(s)

Update of the Role Description.

Mozilla Reps recognizes that our primary goals are best reached through the support, encouragement, and empowerment of community through mentorship. Mentoring is a process for the informal transmission of knowledge, made possible through regular and supportive interaction.

We encourage mentors to be as open to learning from their mentees, as they are to teaching, for the benefit and growth of both individuals and the program as a whole.

Being a Mozilla Reps mentor also requires a familiarity with different tools and processes that the Council has put in place to better streamline the way Mozilla Reps can document their activities, request budgets for projects, order swag and interact with other Reps.

In the SOP, you’ll notice that the mentor roles has been broken-down into two specific categories ‘Mentorship’ and ‘Administration’.  Previously, all tasks were related to the administration-focused tasks, these changes reflect the feedback from Remo Camp on what helps make a good mentor – humanness.

Addition of an Orientation Call.  To facilitate some of the goals we had around communication empowerment, listening and respect – we’ve added an Orientation Call to the new Rep orientation process.  This occurs 2-4 weeks after a Rep has been accepted, and this new SOP includes recommendations for creating efficient feedback loops, and goal-setting.  The orientation call is very, very important in setting expectations for both sides.

We also decided to REMOVE the ‘no-brainer’ option in the interview process for Reps.  Previously, this was based on existing knowledge of someone’s ability to perform as a Rep, but without consideration that interview helps start the conversation about the mentor relationship which is new.  ALL applicants must be interviewed.

Finally, based on ALL the feedback at Remo Camp and ALL the things I could gather on mentorship I created an initial Mentor Training SOP.  We’ll be running through this for our next group of mentors, and continue to improve it based on their feedback  – with hope we can eventually have one or mentor-training videos.

So that’s it!  Although, trust me that a lot of work when into this at RemoCamp and beyond (special thanks to Ankit & Sara and all the Mozilla Rep Mentors who helped define this new direction!)  we welcome feedback, but most of help making this even better.  Happy Mentoring!

 

 


A little contribution
FrancJP on November 21, 2014 01:30 PM

Thanks to Mozilla, I had the pleasure to participate in Øredev. An event that took place in Malmö (Sweden), on November 4th to 7th. And not only that, I also had the opportunity to be at the same event with Soumya Chakraborty and Oliver Propst, the most active members of the nordic communities nowadays.

It was interesting to realize that events that are intended for the same type of audience, people asking almost the same questions everywhere. Happened on Mobile World Congress, and in Øredev too. As occured to me at every spanish event tech oriented (or web-developer oriented), people were curious about Firefox OS and its road map, express their interest in know a little more about the project, and what Mozilla is doing.

On Wednesday 5th, I’ve been requested to go to help the swedish community for this event, and after a long trip of 9 hours, and 2 layovers, I finally arrived to Malmö, a nice city, with a vibrant activity, and this event proves that there is a lot of interest for new technologies in Sweden.

I was helping at the booth with Soumya and Oliver, shared some stories about my experience at other events in Spain, and tried to help them as much as possible with the amount of people that stepped at the booth.

The booth looked pretty awesome and it was one of the busiest stands at the event. We had a TV monitor that leaks the new features of the Developer Browser edition, which also caught the attention of many of the people that ask for a button or sticker. Or simply look the Flame devices that we have there.

All in all, a good experience for me, for the travel, and the experience of having the opportunity to attend an event in another country. I also had to thanks Soumya and Oliver for being such awesome reps, and for make me feel like I’m at home

I probably go back to Malmö to visit the castle, and taste swedish food, but that’s for the next time.


Reps Weekly Call – November 20th 2014
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on November 21, 2014 12:26 PM

Last Thursday we had our regular weekly call about the Reps program, where we talk about what’s going on in the program and what Reps have been doing during the last week.

Summary
  • FOSDEM update.
  • Post-event metrics and receipts (Important reminder)
  • Firefox Tiles Reps FAQ.
  • 10 days of Mozillians.
  • Yahoo agreement.
  • Community newsletter.
  • #fx10 Jakarta
  • Pending Reps applicants.

Detailed notes

AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next week!


Mozilla Guides Call – Nov 19, 2014
Emma on November 20, 2014 10:41 PM

In an effort to make the call more accessible to other timezones we had an early call (7AM PST) today.

EtherPad

We covered a few things I want to highlight:

Guides Update

Guides continues to get busier, and as we’ve had an expected drop-off of Guides from our original group, I want to thank those who are really championing the development and leadership so far in Guides

    • David Teller
    • Vesper Diziewonski
    • Ioana Chiorean
    • Julien G
    • Stefan (Costenslayer)
    • Jennie Rose Halprin
    • Abhishek Potnis
    • Saurabh
    • Diane

With a special shout-out to Ioana, who swept in and saved the day with our many QA questions – Thanks Ioana!

We have more and more people coming through, so building workflows is important – special shout-out to David for helping coders get on the proper pathways, those associated with the Get Involved Page, but also through ‘What can I do for Mozilla‘.

We continue to share success stories, including Jennie’s Journalism group which has started to function even outside of her prompts to get involved, which is fantastic.  We were fortunate to have Jennie on our call, to share some of her experiences.  Thanks Jennie!

I’m thrilled to see more Guides taking the lead in inviting participation through sharing of events and news including Open Science, because the ‘invitation’ to participate is made much clearer through opportunities (vrs not  waiting to be asked).

Guides is very connected in spirit to SUMO, so we’re collaborating closely on how our two areas can work together, and sharing mentoring best practices. Of course if you have questions about contributing to SUMO you can ask in Guides Forum for Helping Users.

 Discourse

A few updates in Discourse.

  • We Split Testing for FIrefox and Firefox OS into two Categories.
  • Added additional headers (New) and (Unread) to help everyone recognize new and unanswered posts.
  • I’ve started posting Guide Call updates,  in the Guides Forum (moderator access needed to view), so as not to email huge lists of people .
  • We have a Bug submitted to setup a Dev instance of Discourse so we can test scrollback.io .
  • We also covered a ‘Best Practice’ for sharing responded to repeated questions with a single answer.  All Discourse Forum posts have ‘links’  and so instead of cutting and pasting text, adding the link to responses will all direct to a single place.  The benefit of course, is that should you need to update your answer, you only have to do it on one place.

    Link Posts

We also added a new category ‘Open Source’, aimed at helping answer questions about the tools, culture and philosophy of working in open source , and Mozilla.  We had a good discussion about perhaps creating a few training missions to get started ( Create Bugzilla Account, IRC Cirriculum) among other things.  I’ll be working on this next week.

Logo

We reviewed the Logo proposals by the very talented Elio Qoshi.  You can find his mockups here, I sent him some feedback which generally came down to the blue compass or the red torch.   We’ll vote on this in the next week.

Guides Resources as Mozilla Learning Resources

Every Guide needs to read this blog post from Christie on the Learning Resources Wiki, *this* is where we will be adding resources for our functional areas.  Please take time to add resources for your functional area, or add them to this Etherpad where I will be collecting my own list.  This is a really exciting opportunity to

  1. Avoid duplication of links
  2. Design quality resources through collaboration between functional areas and community.
  3. Align Contribution with Web Literacy – contributing is learning by doing – and contributors do become more web literate as a result of helping Mozilla.  Let’s make raise the profile of that.
Wrap-Up

We’re very busy answering questions and improving workflow, feedback is very much appreciated.  In addition to the requets for a Dev Discourse to play with, we’re awaiting an opportunity to evaluate Kit Herder (thanks amazing Community IT!)  , for mentoring matches.

 

Photo Image Credit: M0les

 


EuroPython 2014
Michael Kohler on November 20, 2014 07:39 PM

Disclaimer: this is an event report from Marco Perez.

Even though we were very happy to see that Mozilla was a sponsor of “EuroPython 2014″ and even got its own booth, it felt somehow strange to see it all empty. We hoped that maybe it would be equipped and manned in the afternoon or maybe on tuesday.

But wednesday arrived and the booth remained empty. So I contacted Michael, our rep of the swiss Mozilla community. After he asked me to get some swag from the local Mozilla office in Berlin, Marcel and I formed a plan.

After the last talks we went to the office at Voltastr. Fortunately not everybody had gone home yet. Georg showed us around and provided us with an ample supply of stickers and pins. We even got an original Mozilla lanyard each.

So armed with all those goodies as well as some stuff I had brought to Berlin (a t-shirt, a hoodie and the grand-daddy of all B2G phones (a Samsung Galaxy S2, modified to dual-boot a heavily patched nightly build of Firefox OS)) we prepared a surprise in the attic of the bcc.

Thursday saw a slightly different Mozilla booth with a variety of stickers, pins, a Firefox OS mobile phone, posters with some hints (mozilla.org, getfirefox.com, mozillians.org) and QR codes. Unfortunately we couldn’t attend the booth all the time, since there were so many interesting talks we didn’t want to miss.

But the stickers and the pins disappeared almost as fast as I could resupply the booth. I began to suspect that maybe just a few afficionados helped themselves very generously. So in order to spread the remaining pins and a few hundred stickers as effectively as possiblr i had to switch tactics: Welcome to guerilla style! :-)

During the breaks i wandered around on all three floors and discretely placed some stickers on the tables where folks were working, reading, coding, eating, drinking, discussing or having fun. Some didn’t want them while others asked for a few more to give away.

On friday afternoon I gave the last remaing stickers to the volunteers that had helped keep everything going smoothly and we went to clean up the booth.

Lessons learned:
– We must always assume that Mozilla is a sponsor of such events and that there may be no official Mozilla staff available to prepare a booth, especially if there’s some “competing” event (e.g. OSCON).
– There may be no access to the resources (swag, large color printers, demo equipment, competent people) needed to make the booth look “professional”, especially if there’s no time for serious preparation.
– So next time I’m going to attend such an event, I should either coordinate my efforts with my local rep or their local office or have my Bugzilla permissions upgraded so I can check whether there’s some open bug for the event I’m going to visit.



Million Mask March Zurich – 08.11.2014
Michael Kohler on November 20, 2014 07:35 PM

On the 8th of November (yes, 2 days before #fx10), we met in Zurich to provide a tea booth for protesters. There is a new law coming up in Switzerland which would negatively influence everybody’s privacy, which was the reason for the protest. A few days before the event I asked Martin and Gion-Andri from the Swiss community if they’d like to help out with the tea since two other members couldn’t make it that day. Fortunately they said yes and did a great job!

Reminder for everyone who wants to serve tea some time: cooking 28 liters of water for the tea is easy. It took us only about an hour to finish the tea. But since nobody of us is allowed to drive a car (we don’t need to have a car in Switzerland), we had to think about transportation. Since we also had to transport a table we needed a car and couldn’t use public transport. We didn’t find anybody with a car, so we took a taxi. The taxi driver did a great job driving steady to not spill anything. Making any other driver believe that it’s a weird taxi driver driving so slowly? We did it!

There we’re about 80 to 100 people attending. Since Switzerland is quite cold these days, our tea was greatly appreciated. We had a great evening and we’re surprised how many people don’t know the values of Mozilla. We need to have more events like this and show that Mozilla stands for Privacy.


Mozilla Hacking Day 2 – 11.10.2014
Michael Kohler on November 20, 2014 07:32 PM

On the 11th of October we organized a “Mozilla Hacking Day 2″ in Berlin. This was the follow up of the first Hacking Day in Berlin in April.

On Friday we met and went to dinner and talked about the next day. Since we had to wake up early on Saturday we didn’t stay up long (*cough*). On Saturday we had a quick delay since we couldn’t have our room at TU Berlin yet at 9am. Fortunately we could have it at 9:30am and had interesting talks before that while waiting. This was organized together with MeshCon, so we could talk to a lot of people that generally don’t get in touch with Mozilla.

We devided the tables into “Firefox”, “Firefox OS”, “Firefox Addons” and “Other”. All hacking tables had attendees present. Many of them didn’t know what to hack on, so we helped them out. Someone asked me about Popcorn.js and I could show him how to fix a bug (he found it himself!) in Popcorn Maker. On the other tables people were busy hacking on other stuff. I think most people enjoyed this day.

At lunch we had great quiches from Florian, who suggested to cook them for us. These were amazing, thanks again to you, Florian!

From the around 35 attendees, 2 said that they will continue contributing to Mozilla (Add-ons) and one even registered to be an add-on reviewer.

According to the feedback we have decided the following:

  • More specific hackathons (for example “Firefox Hacking”)
  • Since we didn’t do any localization there will be a localization sprint next year
  • It’s hard to get feedback (only 4 people have filled out the form) – how can we improve that?
  • The next time, prepare a “Good First Bug” list beforehand instead of using the bugzilla search

All in all, it was a great day and we’ll certainly provide this opportunity to learn in 2015.

Hacking Day & MeshCon


LibreCon, las empresas se interesan por el Software Libre
FrancJP on November 20, 2014 03:14 PM

El pasado 11 y 12 de Noviembre, tuvimos la oportunidad de participar desde la comunidad, en el evento LibreCon, que se celebró en Bilbao. Un evento para mostrar que el Software Libre también tiene su lugar en las empresas, gobiernos y que hay más oportunidades de trabajo de las que se suele pensar. Las charlas abarcaron desde casos de éxito como el del gobierno de Munich, a proyectos nuevos como Tumaker (Impresoras 3D de código abierto).

Desde Mozilla Hispano tuvimos la oportunidad de participar con 2 charlas. Una a cargo de Pablo Bernardo, que trató sobre Firefox OS y como es posible hacer un Sistema operativo libre para dispositivos móviles, y la segunda fue una retrospectiva de los últimos 10 años de Firefox y hacia dónde vamos, presentada por quien les escribe.

Si bien el evento era más orientado a demostrar casos de éxito y cómo era posible introducir el Software Libre en los organismos públicos, con el ahorro que ello conlleva, se presentaron también varios proyectos nuevos basados en la filosofía de que otra realidad es posible y que no hace falta depender de Software privativo para llevar adelante una administración.

Tuvimos la suerte de que ambas charlas tuvieron bastante buena aceptación, con gente escuchándonos de pie, buenas preguntas y gente interesada por saber más sobre Firefox OS y Mozilla en general. El nivel de la audiencia también permitía esa convocatoria, ya que encajábamos fácilmente en la temática del evento.

Definitivamente necesitamos más eventos como estos en España, que den a conocer los beneficios del software libre, y echen por tierra el mito que una migración en un organismo público es más costoso, o difícil por el nivel técnico que se requiere. Teniendo en cuenta que Microsoft poco a poco está cambiando su filosofía, quizás dejemos de ver tanto lobby en las administraciones públicas y comencemos a ver un poco de sentido común y buenas prácticas.

Próximamente estaré escribiendo más sobre eventos, ya que tenemos el Codemotion a la vuelta de la esquina (este próximo viernes y sábado más específicamente).


Maker Party SVCE
Ajay Kumar Jogawath (noreply@blogger.com) on November 17, 2014 10:39 AM
Maker Party SVCE is organized on Oct 18th 2014, at Sri Venkateshwara College of Engineering, Bangalore. An enthusiastic Mozillian "Nishchal Gautam" from SVCE college reached me to organize a maker party in their college. Then we made a plan to organize this maker party.

Event Name : Maker Party SVCE

Event Link on Reps Portal : https://reps.mozilla.org/e/maker-party-svce/

Venue : Sri Venkateshwara College of Engineering, Bangalore, Karnataka.


                                          Event Poster 
I Started with my fellow mozillians Hemanth  and Bhargav in the morning and reached the venue by 10:00 AM .  The Organizers came to receive us and accompanied till the Auditorium.


                                           #MozSelfie ;) (Right to Left- Ajay, Bhargav, Hemanth)


 We also met Head of the Department of Computer Science in their college and we got a lot of support from them in organizing this event and future events as well.

 We also met an open source enthusiast and a member of FSMK (Free Software Movement Karnataka) Mr.Vijay and he also joined us in spreading the word as an open source as he does always.

Initially, an introduction of speakers to the audience was given by me to everyone and gave a clear picture of the agenda that we had planned for them on that day.



Vijay started with Introduction to Open Source by relating with the real time examples of the open source products which included funny examples too, where the audience became more excited!!!





Thus, it was my chance now to make their excitement reach to the peak by introducing them to the Mozilla by the Mozilla Story and then the Mission of the mozilla.


I continued with the Products of the mozilla and then showing them the newly designed page of Get Involved page of Mozilla, which tells how to contribute and what to contribute depending upon their interest.




Showing about the different kinds of projects to them, we moved on to the Webmaker Project and told them about the amazing tools using which they can create, remix, design webpages and create videos using popcorn maker and apps using appmaker.




Initially, we told them to register on the webmaker portal by signing in using persona. Also told them what is persona? and how it works. They were really excited about the persona login. They have created their user profiles on webmaker portal. Since, it was Lunch time, we gave a break for the lunch and informed to come back after lunch.





Post-Lunch, it was really surprising that the attendees are already present and started using the tools. We gave demos on the each tool and then told them to remix the Webpages, create the videos and hack the pages using x-ray goggles. Due to time constraint, we couldn't move on appmaker. We gave them some time and them to remix the webpages and submit in google form.




It was surprising that we got plenty of makes from them. Moving on, i spoke on the Maker Party and how it is organized globally with number of mozillians through out the world. I have displayed the Maker Party Video which i had with me.

List of Makes can be found here : Webmaker Profiles and makes

Later, i continued with FSA Program, introduced them to the FSA Program, like what is this and how it works and the structure, activities, benefits being an FSA. The thimble make by TJLee was very useful to me in explaning them. Thanks to TJLee.

 FSA Beginners Guide




Then, we had an Q&A session, where we gave them swag for them who answered the questions and later collected the feedback from them. Distributed Swags to all the attendees and they were very happy to see the Laptop Stickers and Badges. The Feedback Video can be seen here  .




Moving on, we had a Photo Session with the participants and it was really fun meeting them and sharing the knowledge with them. The Organizers and the FSA team were very happy for organizing this and wants to organize more such events from Mozilla.






Then we bid a good-bye to them by saying "Bye-Bye Mozillians".


More Images can be found on Flickr here


Best Regards,
Ajay Kumar Jogawath
Mozilla Reps







Reps Weekly Call – November 13rd 2014
Ruben Martin [:Nukeador] on November 14, 2014 12:45 PM

Last Thursday we had our regular weekly call about the Reps program, where we talk about what’s going on in the program and what Reps have been doing during the last week.

Summary
  • New Reps dashboard
  • Portal UX initiative
  • WoMoz update
  • FX10 celebrations

Detailed notes

AirMozilla video

Don’t forget to comment about this call on Discourse and we hope to see you next week!


Hack the MDN and Celebrate Firefox’s 10th Anniversary
birajkarmakar on November 12, 2014 07:02 PM

Hi Friends,

Now I am back with blog post.

This was my first MDN event in my life. I am very glad that I have organized it successfully on 09 NOV 2014. This event was not only MDN event but also we had done our Firefox’s 10th Anniversary celebration in kolkata. Let me tell more about this event.

The agenda of this event :

  1. Brief discussion about MDN
  2. How to start hacking in MDN
  3. Intro to MDN glossary
  4. let’s hack on MDN glossary elements together
  5. Celebrate Firefox’s 10th Anniversary
  6. Lunch
  7. Continue hacking on MDN glossary element
  8. Group photo session and swag distribution

So, we have started this event at 11.00 am. Ohh ! sorry I forgot to tell one thing I have made one #MDNglossaryHackingKit for this event. So first I shared this kit with all the participants. Then started with “Brief discussion about MDN” and gave a description  about basic things of Hacking MDN. Now jumped into MDN glossary. In the mean time, there were some question & answer round between me and participants . So every participants excited to hack the glossary element . So we started hacking ……………

Click to view slideshow.

First I taught them about “How to tag glossary item”. And then I came infront of them with the bunch of Glossary items which need to be tagged from missing tags  . And they completed almost 68 missing tags article within half an hour.

Click to view slideshow.

Then i jumped to teach them “How to improve the glossary article by editing” . They grabbed it very fast and started to contributing. Then we headed for lunch.

Click to view slideshow.

After lunch we again started with “How to write new glossary element”. Then we took prioritized missing glossary elements and started writing missing articles together from Here . And we completed the first draft of all these within  one and half an hour. Now those glossary elements are in review queue.

Click to view slideshow.

Next part is celebration of Firefox’s 10th Anniversary. In this event basically, FSA joined.So they were very excited about #fx10 and #ChooseIndependent. We started with Photo sessions……….

Click to view slideshow.

Then we cut the so yummy Cake for Firefox’s 10th Anniversary and enjoying a lot.

Then swag distribution happened among the participants and took some group pic.

As a Glossary mentor, this event was great for me. I am always feeling great as a Mozillian.  Special thanks goes to Mozilla MDN Community for supporting me to organize this event.

Though it’s long but I hope you enjoy it


Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: #birajakarmakakr, #ChooseIndependent, #fx10, #hackMDN, #mdnindiatour13, #mozilla india, biraj, remo

New dashboard and a first VIP action item: documenting impact
Rosana on November 12, 2014 02:39 PM

We’re very proud to announce that we have a new Reps Dashboard that lists your action items! You will be able to find most of the action items that you have in the Reps program, it will help you organize your activities and plan better your time. We’re also hoping that this will help mentors and council members manage the work load, be able to prioritize and ultimately keep the program running smoothly.

Check out the dashboard and let us know your thoughts. We know there might be some improvements to be done, so your feedback will help us figure this out.

This dashboard comes at the perfect time, we have a first mission for ALL Reps and the dashboard will allow you to do this in no time. We want to understand the impact of the Reps program in 2014 so we are asking all of you to please update ALL the post event metrics for this year. It won’t take much time and at the end you’ll help us articulate better the impact that we’re having with the Reps program. We are introducing text fields, so that you can add important links to your post events metrics. So any links to the makes created, the press articles generated, the social media impact would be of great help!

Help us understand how much reach your event had. How many people attended, how many people did you reach on social media, how many through press articles or blog posts? Let’s work together on making the impact of our work understandable. We have so much to be proud of, let’s document it!


A Web Literacy Pot Luck
Emma on November 12, 2014 02:01 AM

This afternoon I met with a group of parents  – a group of fantastic, involved parents who want to learn,  understand, and just  – ‘get‘ what their middle-school aged children need from them to navigate and survive the web.  At least that’s my take on what they were expecting.

These are also very good friends of mine: home-schoolers, public-schoolers, farmers and many industries of experience between us –  we had our first babies at together, second babies together – and we’ve supported each other through many a thing.   This time, we gathered as a pot-luck with childcare to talk about the web .  We covered Webmaker.org resources tools, the concept of transparency, openness, open web, sharing, coding, data and cyber safety among so many other small things.

I think Mozilla Lightbeam most triggered their interest, as well as the concept that our role as parents – isn’t simply a task of teaching  kids to navigate the web  build for by others – but to remix, oppose, listen-to and follow instincts about what  does and doesn’t feel right;  Teaching what it feels like to be ‘free’ on the web, and what it feels like to be a product can better prepare our kids to advocate for that freedom.

‘Intuition and the Web’.  A take-away phrase.

We also came up with an idea of ‘Block Watch’  for monitoring bullying in middle-school – which , why not, make this a peer run program?

Anyway, I wasn’t planning to blog about this except I had one phone call tonight where my friend said this, and it almost left me teary.

“I came expecting to learn about technical ways to block content on the internet, I left understanding this is an issue of literacy.”

It felt like I made a difference.  Parent’s really need this conversation.

 

 

 


MozFest 2014: what a year!
Rosana on November 11, 2014 11:12 AM

MozFest encapsulates many of the crazy wonders of Mozilla and every year new ideas emerge, new projects are created and new communities come together. 2014 was a great year for Reps; not only have the Reps lead many of the maker parties in the summer, but they are also pushing the Mozilla mission forward in every corner of the world. Having the Reps in London added expertise from all our communities

We would have loved to invite everyone who has been doing wonderful things around the Webmaker projects, but unfortunately we had a limited number of invitations. In London we had a great mix of passionate Reps from all around the world making us so proud of this incredible community who will share their experiences with everyone who couldn’t attend this year.

This year the Reps made a very significant contribution to MozFest! Not only did they facilitate many sessions, including one on community building, but they kept the show going in the background. Big kudos to Robby and all the MozFest helpers. On Sunday Reps literally saved the day! As the fox arrived with a bag full of 1000 phones the Reps (a.k.a Marcia’s flashing Gurus) spent Sunday flashing every phone ensuring that the participants of MozFest had the latest version.

The Flashing Gurus in action

 

It is very humbling to see the energy, the kindness and the commitment of the Reps and we got a lot of recognition, from Mark and Mitchell on the main stage routing for Reps and wearing their Reps hoodies and from the Mozilla community and our friends.

The Reps on the ground also inspired and were inspired by the other participants and brought all the local experiences to MozFest. It is this mix of hands-on work and diversity that opens the horizons for all of us who care about the web and think that this is a critical time to defend the open web and imagine a future where everyone can make active use of this tool for the good of everyone.

We know that the Reps will take their experiences and ignite the Mozfesters in their communities to get together and imagine the world we want to live in. One great example is how our Reps in East Africa pioneered the first MozFest outside of London. This is an exciting model, where Reps and Mozillians take the lead and bring the Mozilla spirit to hundreds of people. And we know that more of this greatness will come in 2015!

There are some amazing blog posts about Mozfest, from the personal experiences of everyone to great descriptions of the sessions, I recommend you check them out. Andre’s blog post is a great read to understand all the amazing things going on at MozFest and how the energy in Ravensbourne leads to so many new ideas. From other Reps we have great blog posts about their experience of MozFest:

Andre Garzia: A free agent at MozFest

Robby Sayles: Behind the scenes

Manel Rhaiem: my first experience at MozFest

Umesh Agarwal: Mozilla Festival 2014

One HUGE thanks to Ioana and Christos who were Chief Reps Wranglers and shined with professionalism, enthusiasm and made us all have a lot of fun. Also, pro tip, if you want to start a party, get some Reps to dance on stage


On Mentorship
Majda Nafissa Rahal (noreply@blogger.com) on November 08, 2014 08:36 PM
A few days ago I stepped down as a mentor in the Mozilla Reps program. I had been a mentor for more than two years, worked with around 15 mentees (overall) from all regions, cultures and... timezones! As with all-things-Mozilla, I learned a lot in the process.
As I am saying goodbye (hopefully a temporary one), I wanted to reflect quickly on my most important takeaways.



1. Push vs. Pull approach to mentorship. It's all in the name. In the push-style mentorship, you act as an external force trying to move an object, to push it in a certain direction. In the pull-style approach, you act as a quiet force waiting to be solicited to exert power in a certain direction. For a less technical analogy, I like the following definition[1]:
- “Push” - directive: solving someone's problems for them.
- “Pull” - non-directive: helping someone to solve their own problems. 
In my short experience, I have found the pull approach to be much more effective. You can only push someone so much, and if you find yourself consistently having to push, then something is clearly not working. In the pull style, you remove yourself as a bottleneck, you're here when your help is needed, the relationship flow is seamless.

2. Defining the relationship from the get-go. The concept of mentor bears different meanings in different cultures. In a global community, it is critical that you be upfront about what this mentorship relationship means. In the context of Mozilla reps, I made it a point to ask my mentees to consider me as a friend before anything else. I am not an administrative superior, I am not here to give orders, I am here to guide and offer opportunities to grow.

3. Patience and time. I see time as a two-dimensional factor here:
- Mentorship, like any relationship, develops over time. Patience will pay dividends.
- Mentorship is time-consuming. Think about it before committing. And when you do, commit for real.

4. Listening is the key. In so many occasions, listening trumps talking. Helping others is a lot more about listening to their needs than it is about imposing your own views of "what works". More often than not, the answer lies there.

5. Availability. A mentor that is not available will not be effective. I cannot stress how important that is. If a mentee doesn't find you when in need, it sets a bad precedent for relying on you in the future.
This is actually the reason why I am leaving today, I cannot be as available as before which makes me rather useless as a mentor.

Now from the other side of the equation, as a mentee, learn to grasp the untold. "Actions speak louder than words" as the saying goes. So much mentorship is implicit, a mentor tells you more by her behavior than by her words. Be someone who observes critically, and who learns through observation.

To all my mentees, thank you for being awesome Mozilla reps and for teaching me so much! I apologize for any shortcomings on my side, we are all learning :)

[1] “More about Mentors and Mentoring | Dormen.” http://www.dormen.org.uk/want-a-mentor/more-about-mentors-and-mentoring/


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